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Ada, or Ardor: A Family Chronicle by…
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Ada, or Ardor: A Family Chronicle (1969)

by Vladimir Nabokov

Other authors: See the other authors section.

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3,221562,573 (4.13)1 / 147
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English (44)  Tagalog (4)  French (3)  Danish (2)  German (1)  Portuguese (1)  Hebrew (1)  All languages (56)
Showing 1-5 of 44 (next | show all)
I spent the better part of a month wading through Vladimir Nabokov's novel "Ada, or Ardor." I generally found this a struggle to get through (though it got somewhat easier by the end) and a bit disappointing. I couldn't help comparing this to "Lolita," which was brilliant in the ways it attempted to make the reader sympathize with a totally repugnant character and this novel just manage to get there.

This book is about man named Van, who has a lifelong incestuous affair with his sister Ada (whom he initially believes is his cousin, which doesn't make it much better.)

I found the bulk of the novel -- which sets up the relationship between the two characters to be a bit boring. It got better when the story got moving (except for that weird time section, which was way over my head.) Overall, I just found this to be disappointing. ( )
  amerynth | Feb 28, 2019 |
This is one of the most beautiful, complicated, strange, difficult books I’ve read. I think it’s the best Nabokov I’ve ever read. I finished it alone on the 4 headed to Brooklyn on a late Saturday night, and I cried all the way home. I’m scared I’ll never find another lover like Ada. ( )
  adaorhell | Aug 24, 2018 |
אני אולי אחד האנשים היחידים בעולם שקרא מרצונו את הספר הארוך והקשה הזה פעמיים ונהנה מכל רגע. למרות שהרבה לא הבנתי אני ולמרות שהרבה מבקרים קטלו אותו אני עדיין חושב שזה ספר נפלא ביחוד עם קוראים אותו באופן פשטני כחגיגה של אושר, אהבה ומיניות בריאה ללא רגשות אשם. יהיה אשר יהיה, כושר הכתיבה של נבוקוב והיכולת שלו להעלות רגעים של יופי ואושר הם מדהימים. ( )
  amoskovacs | Dec 28, 2017 |
Beautifully written about a disturbing relationship within a family. ( )
  brakketh | Jun 2, 2017 |
Martin Amis called it a work by a genius who fell short on talent. Others call it Nabokov's masterpiece. I had put off reading Ada for quite a while, although I consider Nabokov one of the 20th century's finest authors (I have read ten of his books so far). The prose here almost ventures into self-parody, with its abundant puns and anagrams (sometimes in French and Russian), references to other major works of literature, and playing with different novelistic styles. The problem is that this "garden of earthly pleasures" gets to be too much, and overwhelms the narrative, which becomes marginalized. Of course, some might say that by the time this work was published many authors had dispensed with the importance of narrative. Ultimately, the thing feels soulless to me, despite its narrator's professed mission. Nabokov has said how much he disliked his narrator Ivan, who ultimately is one of those unreliable ones. Without giving something away, there is a key event in the latter part of the book of which Ivan could not possibly have known the details, so one wonders how seriously Nabokov wants us to take the whole thing. Incest aside, there just isn't much to like here, despite the admirable writing. ( )
1 vote nog | Mar 15, 2017 |
Showing 1-5 of 44 (next | show all)
At Cornell University, Vladimir Nabokov would always begin his first lecture by saying, "Great novels are above all great fairy tales . . . literature does not tell the truth but makes it up." "Ada," Nabokov's 15th novel, is a great fairy tale, a supremely original work of the imagination. Appearing two weeks after his 70th birthday, it provides further evidence that he is a peer of Kafka, Proust and Joyce, those earlier masters of totally unique universes of fiction.
 

» Add other authors (45 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Vladimir Nabokovprimary authorall editionscalculated
Morey, ArthurNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Mit Ausnahme von Mr. und Mrs. Ronald Oranger, ein paar Randfiguren und einigen nicht-amerikanischen Bürgern sind alle in diesem Buch namentlich erwähnten Personen tot. (Der Hrsg.)
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"All happy families are more or less dissimilar; all unhappy ones are more or less alike," says a great Russian writer in the beginning of a famous novel.
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0679725229, Paperback)

Published two weeks after his seventieth birthday, Ada, or Ardor is one of Nabokov's greatest masterpieces, the glorious culmination of his career as a novelist.  It tells a love story troubled by incest.  But more: it is also at once a fairy tale, epic, philosophical treatise on the nature of time, parody of the history of the novel, and erotic catalogue.   Ada, or Ardor is no less than the supreme work of an imagination at white heat.

This is the first American edition to include the extensive and ingeniously  sardonic appendix by the author, written under the anagrammatic pseudonym Vivian Darkbloom.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:21:29 -0400)

(see all 3 descriptions)

Published two weeks after his seventieth birthday, Ada, or Ardor is one of Nabokov's greatest masterpieces, the glorious culmination of his career as a novelist. It tells a love story troubled by incest. But more: it is also at once a fairy tale, epic, philosophical treatise on the nature of time, parody of the history of the novel, and erotic catalogue. Ada, or Ardor is no less than the supreme work of an imagination at white heat. This is the first American edition to include the extensive and ingeniously sardonic appendix by the author, written under the anagrammatic pseudonym Vivian Darkbloom.… (more)

» see all 3 descriptions

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Penguin Australia

2 editions of this book were published by Penguin Australia.

Editions: 0141181877, 0141197137

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