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The King James Conspiracy by Phillip DePoy
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The King James Conspiracy (original 2009; edition 2009)

by Phillip DePoy

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443262,368 (3.41)3
Member:Robertgreaves
Title:The King James Conspiracy
Authors:Phillip DePoy
Info:St. Martin's Press (2009), Hardcover, 374 pages
Collections:Read but unowned
Rating:**
Tags:contemporary, novel, detective fiction, historical, American author, borrowed from Phil

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The King James Conspiracy by Phillip DePoy (2009)

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One of the translators working in Cambridge on what is to be the Authorised/King James Version of the Bible is murdered. Is the mysterious figure enrolled to find the murderer and protect the other translators quite what he seems? What is the connection with certain very secret documents also entrusted to the translators?

The premise of the book -- suppose the translators of the AV/KJV had been given copies of gnostic and other gospels that didn't make it into the Bible -- deserves a much better piece of speculative fiction than this tosh. The author shows profound ignorance of the religious make up of Jacobean England. One of the translators is described as "a friend of England's notable rabbis". Since except for one or two specifically exempted individuals, Jews were not allowed back into England till the Protectorate, there wouldn't have been any English rabbis, notable or otherwise. What is a monk doing wandering round openly dressed in such a way that people can immediately see that he is a monk or priest? I very much doubt the Pope would have been referred to by ordinary people in England as "His Holiness" or that they would have cared much about his opinion on the translation. Other anachronisms include the Pope referring to the translation (not yet completed) as the King James Version and to the Anglican Communion, two terms that wouldn't start being used till much later.

The translators themselves do not come off well, being assimilated to the most ignorant tendencies in American Christianity. I really can't see that these scholars, expert in Latin, Greek, and Hebrew, would have been so flurried to find that Jesus was called Yeshua in Hebrew, or that there were textual and translation errors in the manuscript tradition.

I borrowed this from a friend, expecting something a lot more entertaining and intelligent. Fortunately he didn't pay the full price for it, just a dollar. Even so, I think he was robbed. ( )
  Robertgreaves | Dec 8, 2012 |
This novel is set in Jacobean England in 1605,during a time of great religious turmoil. King James I has commissioned a new translation of the Bible, to be produced by a committee of scholars.These are the basic historical facts around which the author has woven an imaginative and thrilling tale of espionage, plotting and murder. As a bonus,the author gives some interesting historical data at the end of the book, indicating some of the ways in which he has re-worked or embellished certain real-life characters, and invented others for the purpose of the story. There is also a good bibliography and a list of online resources, including various translations of the Bible. One small error that should have been picked up by an editor - two characters are searching for clues on the ground and and find gopher holes(p129). In America, yes, but not in England,I think. On the whole, though, quite enjoyable, fast-moving and well-researched. ( )
  paulinem | Sep 24, 2009 |
see comments ( )
  jwydeen | Sep 8, 2009 |
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The King James Conspiracy is dedicated to Father Coleman. I took confirmation classes from him when I was eleven years old. At that time, news of the Dead Sea Scrolls was becoming popular. I remember how excited Father Coleman was when he told me what they would mean. "Once they're all translated, we can see what the Bible really says." Nearly fifty years later, as I continue to wait for the complete translation and revelation of the Dead Sea Scrolls (as well as the Nag Hammadi library, known as the Gnostic Gospels, discovered in 1945 and still not fully available to the public), it seems appropriate that this book should belong to Father Coleman.
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"Blood!" The world's most significant ring dented the tabletop; the fist bore it crashing into the wood again and again with each word. "We must have blood."
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0312377134, Hardcover)

The turning of the wheel by the tilling of the wheat.

With these cryptic words, a conspiracy is set into motion that threatens the new translation of the Bible ordered by King James I, and the lives of the scholars working on it.

In 1605, in Cambridge England, a group of scholars brought together to create a definitive English translation of the Bible finds one of its members savagely murdered by unknown hands. Deacon Marbury, the man in charge of this group, seeks outside help to find the murderer, to protect the innocents and their work. But the people who offer to help are not who they claim to be and the man they send to Marbury—Brother Timon—has a secret past, much blood on his hands, and is an agent for those forces that wish to halt the translation itself.

But as the hidden killer continues his gruesome work, the body count among the scholars continues to rise. Brother Timon is torn between his loyalties and believes an even greater crisis looms as ancient and alarming secrets are revealed—secrets dating back to the earliest days of Christianity that threaten the most basic of its closely held beliefs.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:59:51 -0400)

""The turning of the wheel by the tilling of the wheat." With these cryptic words, a conspiracy is set into motion that threatens the new translation of the Bible ordered by King James I." "In 1605, at Cambridge University, one of the translators working on the new Bible is savagely murdered by unknown hands. Deacon Marbury, the man in charge of this group of scholars, seeks outside help to find the murderer and, even more important, to protect the ongoing work. But the people who offer to help are not who they claim to be, and the man they send to Marbury - Brother Timon - has a secret past and blood on his hands. He is an agent for the very forces working to stop the translation itself.". "As the hidden killer continues his gruesome work and the body count among the scholars continues to rise, Brother Timon is increasingly torn between his loyalties and his beliefs. All the while, an even greater crisis looms as ancient and alarming secrets are revealed - secrets dating back to the earliest days of Christianity that challenge the foundation of its beliefs."--BOOK JACKET.… (more)

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