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Sanctuary: The Corrected Text by William…
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Sanctuary: The Corrected Text (original 1931; edition 1993)

by William Faulkner (Author)

Series: Temple Drake (1)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
3,134353,005 (3.56)156
An assortment of perverse characters act out this dramatic story of the kidnapping a Mississippi debutante.
Member:SavRaine
Title:Sanctuary: The Corrected Text
Authors:William Faulkner (Author)
Info:Vintage (1993), 336 pages
Collections:Your library
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Sanctuary by William Faulkner (Author) (1931)

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» See also 156 mentions

English (31)  Spanish (3)  Dutch (1)  All languages (35)
Showing 1-5 of 31 (next | show all)
To Kill a Mockingbird without white savior bullshit. ( )
  ThomasPluck | Apr 27, 2020 |
Nothing happens, weak characterizations. Overall: pointless. Not a rich environment ( )
  GirlMeetsTractor | Mar 22, 2020 |
Sanctuary, one of Faulkner’s early novels, focuses on the dark side of Southern society in post-Civil-War America. It is one of Faulkner’s more readable works. It’s a more straightforward crime mystery that is still based on the convoluted Yoknapatawpha County, Mississippi.

Like many (most/all?) of Faulkner’s characters, they appear aimless and uprooted from life. While in college, the daughter of a judge is raped and is kidnapped to Memphis. She eventually becomes a sex slave in a brothel.

Most of the story lacks a foundation as much as Faulkner’s characters do. Time, as always in Faulkner, plays a central role. Although time progresses in reality, time always seem as stuck as a dead watch to these characters. They lack a basic purpose and direction in life. They had a narrative which was centered around living an aristocratic life with slaves doing the manual work; now, they do not have a sense of self. Lacking a narrative that describes who they are, they also lack a central inspiration to seek something – anything – better.

Of course, Faulkner is sophisticated and heady as always. He is less verbose than he is in many other works (think The Sound and the Fury and Absalom! Absalom! with their page-long sentences). Faulkner claimed to have written this novel purely for profit, but some question this. This book is incredibly action-packed. If anything, the plot advances too quickly rather than too slowly.

Anyone looking for character development will be disappointed by this book. Its characters are run down. In the end, they are lynched, executed for crimes that they didn’t commit, disillusioned, and sexually tortured. They illustrate how precarious life can be – how even a judge’s daughter can end up a sex slave and unable to advocate for herself.

( )
  scottjpearson | Jan 25, 2020 |
This was a strange and dark novel. The plot is revealed in such an interesting way: first giving a baffling scene without any explanation then going over what happened in later chapters. The fragmentary experience of reading the story matches perfectly well with what the main characters experience. Some of the scenes here are truly horrific, others incredibly sensual. All in all this is definitely a minor Faulkner novel but that isn't to say he doesn't continue with themes started in Flags in the Dust: sensory access to experience, the nature of evil, the limits of subjectivity, etc.

I would only recommend this novel to someone if they already had some background in Faulkner's work. It takes knowing what to look for in this story more than others. ( )
  Adrian_Astur_Alvarez | Dec 3, 2019 |
This was a strange and dark novel. The plot is revealed in such an interesting way: first giving a baffling scene without any explanation then going over what happened in later chapters. The fragmentary experience of reading the story matches perfectly well with what the main characters experience. Some of the scenes here are truly horrific, others incredibly sensual. All in all this is definitely a minor Faulkner novel but that isn't to say he doesn't continue with themes started in Flags in the Dust: sensory access to experience, the nature of evil, the limits of subjectivity, etc.

I would only recommend this novel to someone if they already had some background in Faulkner's work. It takes knowing what to look for in this story more than others. ( )
  Adrian_Astur_Alvarez | Dec 3, 2019 |
Showing 1-5 of 31 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (76 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Faulkner, WilliamAuthorprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Aalberse, Han B.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Keulen, Johan vanTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Keulen, Mar vanTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
López Muñoz, José LuísTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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An assortment of perverse characters act out this dramatic story of the kidnapping a Mississippi debutante.

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