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The House at the End of the Road: The Story…
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The House at the End of the Road: The Story of Three Generations of an…

by W. Ralph Eubanks

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The house at the end of the road is an excellent read for anyone looking to explore the history of their family. Mr. Eubanks peaked my interest with "Ever is a long time" his first book. The house at the end of the road takes us back to a time when people of color were invisible. Especially in Mississippi/Alabama. Through the searches, oral interviews, etc. Mr. Eubanks found a well to incorporate history as we know and to tell the story about life in the deep south.
  nluvwithx | Jun 4, 2010 |
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 006137573X, Hardcover)

A powerful story about race and identity told through the lives of one American family across three generations

In 1914, in defiance of his middle-class landowning family, a young white man named James Morgan Richardson married a light-skinned black woman named Edna Howell. Over more than twenty years of marriage, they formed a strong family and built a house at the end of a winding sandy road in South Alabama, a place where their safety from the hostile world around them was assured, and where they developed a unique racial and cultural identity. Jim and Edna Richardson were Ralph Eubanks's grandparents.

Part personal journey, part cultural biography, The House at the End of the Road examines a little-known piece of this country's past: interracial families that survived and prevailed despite Jim Crow laws, including those prohibiting mixed-race marriage. As he did in his acclaimed 2003 memoir, Ever Is a Long Time, Eubanks uses interviews, oral history, and archival research to tell a story about race in American life that few readers have experienced. Using the Richardson family as a microcosm of American views on race and identity, The House at the End of the Road examines why ideas about racial identity rooted in the eighteenth century persist today. In lyrical, evocative prose, this extraordinary book pierces the heart of issues of race and racial identity, leaving us ultimately hopeful about the world as our children might see it.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:57:50 -0400)

Relates the story of the author's grandparents, an interracial couple in early twentieth-century Alabama who were able to build a strong family and establish a unique cultural and racial identity in spite of Jim Crow laws.

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