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The Idiot by Fyodor Dostoevsky
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The Idiot (1869)

by Fyodor Dostoevsky

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Showing 1-5 of 95 (next | show all)
The Idiot, Dostoyevsky is by far one of my favorite Russian authors. I've read 3 of the 5 books he has on the 1001 list. Looking at his life as I just did, I did not realize that he actually was given a death sentence when he was arrested for opposing the monarchy. This is touched on in this book in the chapter where they are discussing that death by murder is better than death by sentence. His time spent in prison and labor probably made him the man that can write such stories as Crime and Punishment, Brother's K and The Idiot. In his travels, he meets Appolinaria Suslova. His relationship with her is reflected in “The Idiot,” “The Gambler” (“Igrok”) and his other works. She is believed to be the main inspiration for Dostoevsky’s female characters. He did not marry her but instead married his stenographer. Who he may have used as inspiration for Nastasya Fillipnova. (http://russiapedia.rt.com/prominent-r...) This book is about a man who is good and kindhearted in contrast to the wordly people he encounters in Russia. The author set out to write a story of a splendidly good man and he said it was the most difficult thing to do. His books are largely translated and required reading in many schools. His stories reflect the mood of the times and his views of Russia. The story and characters are well developed. I certainly can see that writing about someone who is "simply good" would be hard to stick to as humans just aren't that good therefore the prince is a Christ like figure with Rogozhin serving as the antagonist to the prince. I listened to the Blackstone audio and narrated by Robert Whitfield and the pdf file translated by Eva Martin. The audio was good but I really did not like his women voices and so therefore this might not be the best audio. Did the author achieve creating a splendidly good man. Yes and no. I don't know why a splendidly good man would also be a man who suffers from epilepsy and had to be hospitalized or is that how he became a good man because he had been removed from the world and not contaminated by the world. While this was the author's favorite book, it wasn't mine, I think I liked The Brothers Karamazov best so far. Rating is 4.5 ( )
1 vote Kristelh | Feb 3, 2017 |
the adventures of Prince Myshkin. A mental patient who is cured, falls in love with one woman, is scorned by her, falls in love with another young lady, the first woman intrigues to break them up just to show she can, he is forced to choose between them, chooses the first woman, she leaves him at the altar for a former lover, who then kills her in revenge, the second woman marries badly and becomes estranged from her family and the Prince ends up an Idiot back where he came from. Not uplifting at all in my opinion. I liked the story overall, but the author skipped whole months near the beginning and then would spend inordinate amounts of time recounting peoples speeches. There were times I wondered if I was reading some sort of political/theological diatribe, which to be honest, these writings are. It's under my belt, done with. ( )
1 vote BookstoogeLT | Dec 10, 2016 |
Nästan lika bra som Brott och straff. ( )
  Arwid | Jul 20, 2016 |
Prince Myshkin arrives to St. Petersburg as a naive, full of life fellow. It turns out that he is quite unable to survive in the high society of the Russian metropole. The first day of the book is the most enjoyable to read. The book unfolds in the one day described so that the prince already is a complex love relationship with Nastasya Filipovna by the end of the very first day he is staying in St.Petersburg. Then Myshkin falls in love with another woman, Aglaya Yepanchina. She is a daughter of a distant relative of prince Myshkin. Eventually the story takes twists and turns that are quite a torment to read.

It is widely perceived that Dostoyevsky used many elements of his own life in creating the characters for this story. (F.e he had a lover that quite resembled the character of Nastasya filipovna.) Such notions always make a book more interesting to read.

The middle part of the book is quite philosophical and promoting russian patriotism and deep religiousness, themes that Dostoyevsky likes to discuss. Towards the end I was in pain to see how prince Myshkin was shattered slowly but surely into bits and pieces, perhaps suggesting that true virtue does not survive in the real world. ( )
1 vote Kindnist85 | May 25, 2016 |
I'm not worthy enough to review Dostoyevsky. ( )
2 vote Garrison0550 | May 10, 2016 |
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» Add other authors (426 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Dostoevsky, Fyodorprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Dahl, StaffanTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Eichenberg, FritzIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Frank, JosephIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Garnett, ConstanceTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Geier, SwetlanaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Kjetsaa, GeirTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Kuukasjärvi, OlliTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Magarshack, DavidTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Manger, HermienTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Martin, Eva M.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Pevear, RichardTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Thomson, J.Jac.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Timmer, Charles B.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Volokhonsky, LarissaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Witt, SusannaForewordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Yarmolinksy, AvrahmIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Towards the end of November, during a warm spell, at around nine o'clock in the morning, a train of the Petersburg-Warsaw line was approaching Petersburg at full steam.
At nine o'clock in the morning, towards the end of November, the Warsaw train was approaching Petersburg at full speed. It was thawing, and so damp and foggy that it was difficult to distinguish anything ten paces from the line to right or left of the carriage windows. Some of the passengers were returning from abroad, but the third-class compartments were most crowded, chiefly with people of humble rank, who had come a shorter distance on business. All of course were tired and shivering, their eyes were heavy after the night's journey, and all their faces were pale and yellow to match the fog. [Trans. Constance Garnett]
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Book description
After his great portrayal of a guilty man in Crime and Punishment, Dostoevsky set out in The Idiot to portray a man of pure innocence. The twenty-six-year-old Prince Myshkin, following a stay of several years in a Swiss sanatorium, returns to Russia to collect an inheritance and “be among people.” Even before he reaches home he meets the dark Rogozhin, a rich merchant’s son whose obsession with the beautiful Nastasya Filippovna eventually draws all three of them into a tragic denouement. In Petersburg the prince finds himself a stranger in a society obsessed with money, power, and manipulation. Scandal escalates to murder as Dostoevsky traces the surprising effect of this “positively beautiful man” on the people around him, leading to a final scene that is one of the most powerful in all of world literature.
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0375702245, Paperback)

Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokhonsky’s masterful translation of The Idiot is destined to stand with their versions of Crime and Punishment, The Brothers Karamazov, and Demons as the definitive Dostoevsky in English.

After his great portrayal of a guilty man in Crime and Punishment, Dostoevsky set out in The Idiot to portray a man of pure innocence. The twenty-six-year-old Prince Myshkin, following a stay of several years in a Swiss sanatorium, returns to Russia to collect an inheritance and “be among people.” Even before he reaches home he meets the dark Rogozhin, a rich merchant’s son whose obsession with the beautiful Nastasya Filippovna eventually draws all three of them into a tragic denouement. In Petersburg the prince finds himself a stranger in a society obsessed with money, power, and manipulation. Scandal escalates to murder as Dostoevsky traces the surprising effect of this “positively beautiful man” on the people around him, leading to a final scene that is one of the most powerful in all of world literature.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 17:58:51 -0400)

(see all 9 descriptions)

Prince Myshkin, a good yet simple man, is out of place in the corrupt world obsessed by wealth, power, and sexual conquest created by Russia's elite ruling class, as he becomes caught in the middle of a violent love triangle with two women who become rivals for his attention.… (more)

» see all 13 descriptions

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Audible.com

12 editions of this book were published by Audible.com.

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Penguin Australia

2 editions of this book were published by Penguin Australia.

Editions: 014044792X, 0451531523

Tantor Media

An edition of this book was published by Tantor Media.

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Urban Romantics

An edition of this book was published by Urban Romantics.

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