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The Life of Glass by Jillian Cantor
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The Life of Glass (edition 2010)

by Jillian Cantor

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888137,094 (4)2
Member:JillianCantor
Title:The Life of Glass
Authors:Jillian Cantor
Info:HarperTeen (2010), Hardcover, 352 pages
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The Life of Glass by Jillian Cantor

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Did you know glass won’t dissolve for a million years? Such are the types of facts collected by Melissa during the times she and her dad spent pondering the mysteries of the world. When he dies of cancer, Melissa is left with the bit of glass she’d found one day with her best friend Ryan, and Dad’s last words about the fate of glass. Starting high school without her dad is hard enough without her beautiful and popular sister Ashley reminding her everyday of how ugly and lonely she feels.

Read more at: http://shouldireaditornot.wordpress.com/ ( )
  ShouldIReadIt | Sep 26, 2014 |
When her father talks about the life of glass, I found it really interesting. The things that her father knew were very unique to read so it was a plus when reading this book. It's a nice coming of age story, apart from the fact that Melissa is slowly getting over her grief.

This book had a lot of stories going on, so the characters very developed because you got to hear about Ryan's, Ashley's, and Courtney's story so it's interesting. The story also broke away from what you see from the person at first, for example Melissa's aunt who you think is supposed to be uptight, but instead there's more to her. I did find the Sally Bedford mystery, although interesting, a bit strange to add in.

Melissa's a real character and an easy one to relate to. Despite all this, I couldn't exactly get in to the story for some reason, I don't know why. I did find myself irritated at Melissa at the end. The ending wrapped up the book nicely, but somehow I didn't exactly enjoy it. Oh well, this was a nice book to read and I will read the other books the author has. ( )
  gubry | Sep 24, 2010 |
Kearsten says: Melissa begins high school still grieving over her father's death. Through the year, she gains strength to deal with falling for her best friend Ryan, high school troubles and new friend problems by reading and rereading her father's journal.

Melissa and her sister have a hard time with their mother's foray back into the dating scene, but Melissa seems to struggle most with being the 'plain' one in the family. Both her mother and sister are beauties, and their focus on their looks and attempts to 'pretty' Melissa up cause friction, which I found believable. And while I liked the play between Melissa and her best friend Ryan, I can't help but roll my eyes at yet another boy/girl best-friendship turning into a love match. Why must we still buy into the When Harry Met Sally assertion that men and women can't be friends without falling in love?

Melissa coming to terms with her father's death is at the core of the story, and it is a bit heartbreaking to go on the journey with her.

Recommended. ( )
  59Square | Sep 2, 2010 |
Melissa begins high school still grieving over her father's death. Through the year, she gains strength to deal with falling for her best friend Ryan, high school troubles and new friend problems by reading and rereading her father's journal.

Melissa and her sister have a hard time with their mother's foray back into the dating scene, but Melissa seems to struggle most with being the 'plain' one in the family. Both her mother and sister are beauties, and their focus on their looks and attempts to 'pretty' Melissa up cause friction, which I found believable. And while I liked the play between Melissa and her best friend Ryan, I can't help but roll my eyes at yet another boy/girl best-friendship turning into a love match. Why must we still buy into the When Harry Met Sally assertion that men and women can't be friends without falling in love?

Melissa coming to terms with her father's death is at the core of the story, and it is a bit heartbreaking to go on the journey with her.

Recommended. ( )
1 vote kayceel | Aug 12, 2010 |
Reviewed by Jaglvr for TeensReadToo.com

THE LIFE OF GLASS is a coming-of-age story of a high school freshman dealing with the death of her father and her troubling feelings for her best friend.

Melissa McAllister is the smart one. She spent lots of time with her father, who shared interesting facts and tidbits with her. But her father has died of cancer, leaving behind his journal of thoughts and findings. It's to this journal that Melissa turns to when she needs to keep her father close.

When her best friend, Ryan, discovers a special piece of glass in the wash where they hang out in the dry season, she tells him that a single piece of glass can last a million years. Melissa keeps the glass with her most of the time as her special token.

During the course of her freshman year, Melissa lives in the shadows of her beautiful older sister. Her mom and sister share a bond that she's always been left out of. When a gorgeous new girl arrives at school and befriends Melissa, even her sister is surprised. Courtney is nothing like Melissa. But soon, Courtney is moving in on Melissa's best friend, even when Melissa assures her that she and Ryan are only friends.

Ryan starts spending all of his time with Courtney and Melissa is again alone. When a popular older boy starts paying attention to her, her life starts to change drastically.

Ms. Cantor writes a bittersweet story of a girl trying to deal with the loss of her father, whom she was quite close to. She also touchingly portrays the struggles Melissa faces when she comes to realize that maybe her feelings for her best friend go beyond friendship. Over the course of Melissa's year, she matures and grows in confidence and self-esteem, as those around her come to accept her for who she is - and she learns to accept herself, as well. ( )
  GeniusJen | Jun 19, 2010 |
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Throughout her freshman year of high school, fourteen-year-old Melissa struggles to hold onto memories of her deceased father, cope with her mother's return to dating, get along with her sister, and sort out her feelings about her best friend, Ryan.

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