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The Autobiography of Malcolm X by Malcolm X
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The Autobiography of Malcolm X (1965)

by Malcolm X, Alex Haley

Other authors: See the other authors section.

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English (77)  Finnish (1)  All languages (78)
Showing 1-5 of 77 (next | show all)
What a book to read given what is going on in Ferguson, MO. I was about 1/2 way through this autobiography when the murder of that young man took place. For those of you who have read this book, you will recall (I'm sure) that the middle section of the book is page after page of "white devils" and the evils (no redemption possible) of white society. I surely wish I had been reading this book with a group to discuss my emotional register throughout this book. I had a real hard time with Malcolm X's hatred (yes, I'll use the word hate) of women and found myself really struggling to keep moving forward with his story. Where I ultimately found peace is in the afterword, written by Alex Haley, wherein he discusses a wider picture of Malcolm X and even sheds some light on what a difficult (yet irresistibly intriguing) fella he was.
( )
  ambersnowpants | Aug 23, 2018 |
This book will give you an insight into Malcolm X's life but also is very interesting and educate the reader about the civil rights.
**This book correlates with these others (and many more):
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[b:Invisible Man|16981|Invisible Man|Ralph Ellison|https://images.gr-assets.com/books/1352854247s/16981.jpg|170957 ( )
  KristaKennard | Jun 15, 2018 |
I was an infant when Malcolm X was assassinated, born to conservative, white, Northern parents who didn't talk much about civil rights or racial issues. My education about him and his life was certainly not made better in my social studies or history classes. So here I am, many decades later, trying to understand more about my world.

In combination with a list of other books I've read recently**, this stands out as an especially eye-opening piece of history. Malcolm X told his story to writer Alex Haley, a journalist who would later write [b:Roots: The Saga of an American Family|546018|Roots The Saga of an American Family|Alex Haley|https://images.gr-assets.com/books/1329398936s/546018.jpg|2529422]. The book reads as if the reader is being told the story directly, but also includes a long epilogue-style chapter from Haley. The book's conversational style makes it flow more easily, although I found Malcolm X's longer diatribes to be an amalgamation of overwhelming and fascinating. He was incredibly passionate about his beliefs!

The autobiography offers all of us a rare chance to climb inside one black man's thought process and life experiences. It covers issues of segregation, desegregation, assimilation, integration, racism, Islam, Christianity, separatism, anger, and hate in a brutally honest way.

After reading this, I think I may just have a clearer understanding of why African American people feel the way they do today. Or let's just say I understand as much as a privileged white woman can.

Because of Malcolm X's story and ideas, I've also learned about white people and the hate groups which still play such a part in our current world. For example, I never fully believed that white legislators could obstruct President Obama simply because he is black. But reading Malcolm X, I certainly see how and why that could be true.

I have many more books to read in my journey to learn the history and current events I've missed. I can't imagine gaining a complete perspective without this stellar book.


**This book correlates with these others (and many more):
[b:Another Brooklyn|27213163|Another Brooklyn|Jacqueline Woodson|https://images.gr-assets.com/books/1465878266s/27213163.jpg|47255158]
[b:Between the World and Me|25489625|Between the World and Me|Ta-Nehisi Coates|https://images.gr-assets.com/books/1451435027s/25489625.jpg|44848425]
[b:March|29844341|March (Trilogy Slipcase Set)|John Lewis|https://images.gr-assets.com/books/1461533354s/29844341.jpg|50203768]
[b:Kindred|60931|Kindred|Octavia E. Butler|https://images.gr-assets.com/books/1339423248s/60931.jpg|1049657]
[b:Whatever Happened to Interracial Love?|29505406|Whatever Happened to Interracial Love?|Kathleen Collins|https://images.gr-assets.com/books/1459112860s/29505406.jpg|49794478]
[b:Invisible Man|16981|Invisible Man|Ralph Ellison|https://images.gr-assets.com/books/1352854247s/16981.jpg|170957] ( )
  TheBibliophage | Mar 20, 2018 |
This review was one I had to mull over before writing. As a student (under- and grad), I used to write my papers mentally long before committing the ideas to the Word document. Most of the reviews I've done since joining Litsy and GR have come easily. This book evoked a variety of thoughts and feelings in me, and that is why I had to really think about what I wanted to write.

I try to respect everyone's religious beliefs, and thus, wrestled within myself when I read about how the Nation of Islam explained the creation of man. I did not want to be disrespectful, but I also found it difficult to believe. That was probably one of my biggest challenges; of course, I acknowledged to myself that this was through the "voice" of Malcolm X, and thus, might be his perspective of the view, but with that said, it did not lessen my challenge as a reader and educator.

As an educator, I was inspired by his description of learning to become a reader while in prison. He talked about the importance of literacy and recognizing how impactful it can be to a person's life, which is a view that I completely support and promote. This was a wonderful aspect of Malcolm X I did not know, and I am not sure he is given enough credit for, even by those who are willing to give him credit.

Do I recommend this? Absolutely. I wish, sincerely wish, my library had it as an audiobook. I wish, sincerely wish, he were alive to read it, too, because I would love to hear him. I can imagine him "telling these stories" to Alex Haley, and at times, laughing as he remembered some of his shenanigans. Of course, there were extremely hard times, too. He owns it all, and he is to be respected and admired for growing as a man and continuously seeking to make the world a better place. Do I necessarily agree with ANY means? No, but, then, I do not agree with violence. I understand, but would prefer protest and civil disobedience. In that regard, I have to agree with Dr. King. If you get a chance, do read this and get a glimpse at another of America's great voices. We are a great nation because we disagree. We are a great nation because we are willing to argue to make our country equal for all. We are a great nation because we are all kinds of people, from all walks of life. He reminds of us that, and at this time in modern America, when overt racism is once again becoming fashionable, it is time to be reminded anew that we cannot afford to return to the past. ( )
  ptkpepe98 | Mar 19, 2018 |
Read in High School
Age 13 (2006) – Age 22 (2015)
  KiTiraShorter | Mar 5, 2018 |
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» Add other authors (15 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
X, Malcolmprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Haley, Alexmain authorall editionsconfirmed
Davis, OssiePost-scriptsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Handler, M. S.Introductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Sükösd MihályTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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First words
When my mother was pregnant with me, she told me later, a party of hooded Ku Klux Klan riders galloped up to our home in Omaha, Nebraska, one night.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Information from the Dutch Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
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Book description
In the searing pages of this classic autobiography, originally published in 1964, Malcolm X, the Muslim leader, firebrand, and anti-integrationist, tells the extraordinary story of his life and the growth of the Black Muslim movement. His fascinating perspective on the lies and limitations of the American Dream, and the inherent racism in a society that denies its nonwhite citizens the opportunity to dream, gives extraordinary insight into the most urgent issues of our own time. The Autobiography of Malcolm X stands as the definitive statement of a movement and a man whose work was never completed but whose message is timeless. It is essential reading for anyone who wants to understand America.
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Amazon.com Amazon.com Review (ISBN 0345350685, Paperback)

Malcolm X's searing memoir belongs on the small shelf of great autobiographies. The reasons are many: the blistering honesty with which he recounts his transformation from a bitter, self-destructive petty criminal into an articulate political activist, the continued relevance of his militant analysis of white racism, and his emphasis on self-respect and self-help for African Americans. And there's the vividness with which he depicts black popular culture--try as he might to criticize those lindy hops at Boston's Roseland dance hall from the perspective of his Muslim faith, he can't help but make them sound pretty wonderful. These are but a few examples. The Autobiography of Malcolm X limns an archetypal journey from ignorance and despair to knowledge and spiritual awakening. When Malcolm tells coauthor Alex Haley, "People don't realize how a man's whole life can be changed by one book," he voices the central belief underpinning every attempt to set down a personal story as an example for others. Although many believe his ethic was directly opposed to Martin Luther King Jr.'s during the civil rights struggle of the '60s, the two were not so different. Malcolm may have displayed a most un-Christian distaste for loving his enemies, but he understood with King that love of God and love of self are the necessary first steps on the road to freedom. --Wendy Smith

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 17:58:35 -0400)

(see all 8 descriptions)

The Black leader discusses his political philosophy and reveals details of his life, shedding light on the ideas that enabled him to gain the allegiance of a still growing percentage of the Black population.

» see all 8 descriptions

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Penguin Australia

2 editions of this book were published by Penguin Australia.

Editions: 0141185430, 0141032723

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