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Shoeless Joe by W. P. Kinsella
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Shoeless Joe (1982)

by W. P. Kinsella

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1,603406,929 (4.02)117
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This isn't a book that I would normally pickup because I am not a sports fan, but I always loved the movie and I occasionally find more real life information about the characters. It's made me love the story more. So far the book is very much like the movie. I almost hear Costner reading it in my head. I will be reading the Moonlight Graham story soon.


( )
  ISCCSandy | Apr 9, 2019 |
This isn't a book that I would normally pickup because I am not a sports fan, but I always loved the movie and I occasionally find more real life information about the characters. It's made me love the story more. So far the book is very much like the movie. I almost hear Costner reading it in my head. I will be reading the Moonlight Graham story soon.


( )
  ISCCSandy | Apr 9, 2019 |
Audiobook. This was the Kinsella book that became the movie 'Field of Dreams'. Can't recall the movie well enough to say how it differs but the book was delightful. The nostalgia and love for the wonderful game and pastime were palpable. What also touched me was Ray's earthy love for his wife Annie - nothing graphic but earthy and lovely. This really is a mystical, feel good masterpice. ( )
  martinhughharvey | Jun 10, 2018 |
It is difficult to read this book after seeing the movie. The film is, of course, a classic baseball movie, and so I found myself anticipating certain scenes, and noticing that certain lines occur in different parts of the story, and are even uttered by different characters. (For example, "Is this heaven?" in the book is asked by Joe Jackson, not Ray's father.) There are major characters that don't appear in the film (Eddie Scissons). Further, the story in the book spans a much longer time than the movie.

Nevertheless, the fundamental drama remains just as compelling. The additional characters add depth & complexity to the story. Scissons in particular gives a speech on baseball as religion that, while intentionally simplistic, combines with Salinger's speech on how baseball has always been the one constant theme in America, helps explain why no other sport can ever capture the imagination of the American public the way baseball can. ( )
  Scott_Hercher | Nov 25, 2017 |
This is the novel where "Field of Dreams" was written, watched the movie as I read throughout the book. ( )
  Gatorhater | Mar 25, 2017 |
Showing 1-5 of 40 (next | show all)
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Epigraph
"Some men see things as they are, and say why. I dream of things that never were, and say why not."

--Bobby Kennedy
Dedication
For Olive Kinsella and Margaret Elliott; for Ethel Anderson. In memory of John Matthew Kinsella (1896-1953)
First words
My father said he saw him years later playing in a tenth-rate commercial league in a textile town in Carolina, wearing shoes and an assumed name.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Amazon.com Amazon.com Review (ISBN 0395957737, Paperback)

W. P. Kinsella plays with both myth and fantasy in his lyrical novel, which was adapted into the enormously popular movie, Field of Dreams. It begins with the magic of a godlike voice in a cornfield, and ends with the magic of a son playing catch with the ghost of his father. In Kinsella's hands, it's all about as simple, and complex, as the object of baseball itself: coming home. Like Ring Lardner and Bernard Malamud before him, Kinsella spins baseball as backdrop and metaphor, and, like his predecessors, uses the game to tell us a little something more about who we are and what we need.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:07:49 -0400)

(see all 4 descriptions)

A dreamer builds a baseball diamond amid the Iowa cornfields and waits for the outstanding, but dead, baseball players of the past to show up for a very special game.

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