HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

The Longest Night by Marion Dane Bauer
Loading...

The Longest Night (original 2009; edition 2009)

by Marion Dane Bauer

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
466251,994 (3.97)1
Member:bookwren
Title:The Longest Night
Authors:Marion Dane Bauer
Info:Holiday House (2009), Hardcover, 24 pages
Collections:Nature, Children's Literature, Your library
Rating:****1/2
Tags:None

Work details

The Longest Night by Marion Dane Bauer (2009)

None

None.

Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 1 mention

Showing 1-5 of 6 (next | show all)
Young Reader Reaction: At first our daughter thought this "too babyish" for her. Then, as we kept reading, she settled in and snuggled close. When we finished reading, she picked up the book, looked at the illustrations slowly, and read it again.

Adult Reader Reaction: This is a beautiful book - both words and images. It is not a rhyming story, but it has a soothing lyric like a lullaby. The colors exude the chill of the season, too.

Pros: Soothing verse and beautiful illustrations make this a perfect bedtime story for a cold winter's night.

To read our full review, go to The Reading Tub®.
  TheReadingTub | Aug 12, 2014 |
The Longest Night, by Marion Dane Bauer, illustrated by Ted Lewin (2009)

“The snow lies deep.

The night is long and long.

The stars are ice, the moon a frost,

and all the world is still.”

So opens this quiet, magical celebration of the winter solstice. Bauer and Lewin match prose and paintings in a luminous portrayal of the long, cold night and animals awaiting the return of the sun. The wind is the wise one, “the bitter wind” who knows what the animals do not. Crow, “the night-dark crow” is the first to boast that he is the one, the one to bring back the sun, using his strong wings to reach the sun, his strong beak to poke him awake. “Not you,” sighs the wind. “Not you.” And so Wind denies “the mighty moose” with “antlers strong enough to scoop up the sun and bring it home” and the “clever fox” with a keen nose to find the sun’s hiding spot. When small Chickadee asks who will bring back the sun, Wind says, “You … only you.” The larger animals jeer, yet Chickadee does “what chickadees do best.” She sings her ”dee-dee-dee,” … and the sun smiles.

This is the essence of an Everybody book, a picture book to be enjoyed by all ages. On the surface, young children will love the repitition of the wind’s “sha” calls and the animals’ boasts. Older children and adults will admire Lewin’s realistic depictions of the night world beneath a full moon’s glow. They will find the deeper meaning in the themes of darkness and light, that we need both in our world, for they reflect one another. I love the repetitious language: “long and long”, “moose, the mighty moose”, “fox, the clever fox” which lends emphasis to important points. Lewin’s paintings are amazing in their detail and in the feelings they generate: of warmth despite the coldness of winter and night; of the fox’s face which looks clever and sly; of the sleeping bear, which could almost be a dark jumble of forested boulders, and the “velvet mice” curled together beneath the bear’s shadow. I read this book every winter solstice, share it with family and friends and think about the comfort of long winter nights to read and think and write, cuddle up by a fire, and wait for spring. ( )
  bookwren | Dec 22, 2012 |
Cute book but unsure of the purpose behind the book. Beautiful imagery and descriptive words. ( )
  ErinBayless | Dec 3, 2012 |
There is a realistic artistic interpretation in this book of the animals. The illustrations are Really beautiful. It is about a cold snowy night where all the animals are trying to figure out what they can use in order to get the sun to rise the wind keeps telling the animals that they do not have the power to raise the sun. However, the Chickadee is the only one who is able to raise the sun with the song. This book can be for students at a 2nd grade level. ( )
  leighfer23 | Oct 10, 2012 |
"The Longest Night" is a quiet melody that pays homage to the littlest of heroes. It's a cold, cold winter, a time when "cold and dark now rule." Those of the forest worry that the sun will not return. A crow, a moose and a fox brag that they can bring back the sun. One by one each call out, and one by one, each fail. Who will bring back the sun?

Marion's poetic text sings, evoking the rhythms found in the sights and sounds of nature's winter. Reflecting the traditional motif in ancient storytelling, the smallest hero is chosen by the wind: "'You," says the wind. "Only you." No one believes this little hero can bring back the sun. Somehow, this reluctant hero must find the courage to sing back the sun.

Ted Lewin uses watercolor masterfully to bring dimension and wonder to the story. Reflecting winter in the forest, he uses only three colors : blue, brown, and a special shade of green. Until, of course, the sun smiles, and then the final three pages light up - literally.

This book is an exceptional read aloud, especially for a cold winter's night! ( )
  bobbibooks | Jul 7, 2011 |
Showing 1-5 of 6 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
For all my grandchildren -M.D.B.
To Susan Pearson and Alice Schertle. Thanks for the use of the woods. -T. L.
First words
The snow lies deep.
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Book description
It is the longest night of the year, and the snow lies deep. All through the forest, animals long for dawn's warmth. Strong and clever creatures boast that only they can bring back the sun. But the wind knows better. The wind calls Chickadee, whose simple song wakes the sun. In this lyrical story from Marion Dane Bauer with breathtaking watercolors by Ted Lewin, it will take a tiny and gentle creature to summon a new day.
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 082342054X, School & Library Binding)

It is the longest night of the year, and the snow lies deep. All through the forest, animals long for dawn's warmth. Strong and clever creatures boast that only they can bring back the sun. But the wind knows better. The wind calls Chickadee, whose simple song wakes the sun. In this lyrical story from Marion Dane Bauer with breathtaking watercolors by Ted Lewin, it will take a tiny and gentle creature to summon a new day.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:25:16 -0400)

(see all 2 descriptions)

One very long night, a crow, a moose, and a fox all claim they can bring back the sun, but the wind knows that only one little creature has what is needed to end the darkness.

(summary from another edition)

Quick Links

Swap Ebooks Audio
3 wanted

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.97)
0.5
1
1.5
2 1
2.5
3 4
3.5
4 5
4.5 1
5 5

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

Help/FAQs | About | Privacy/Terms | Blog | Contact | LibraryThing.com | APIs | WikiThing | Common Knowledge | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | 93,467,360 books! | Top bar: Always visible