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The House of the Seven Gables [Norton…
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The House of the Seven Gables [Norton Critical Edition] (1851)

by Nathaniel Hawthorne

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I wasn't expecting to enjoy Nathaniel Hawthorne's novel "The House of the Seven Gables," but I really did. It was a good gothic story, with the house itself almost painted as a character, that moved along at a nice pace.

The story focuses on the owners of the seven-gabled homes, the Pyncheon family, which has a rather sordid history associated with the property. As a result, they suffer from a curse of sorts with the bulk of their inheritance -- a deed showing their ownership of a large tract of Maine woodland -- has been lost to time.

I enjoyed the twists and turns of the story and found this fairly compelling. ( )
  amerynth | Jun 16, 2019 |
I need to read this again. I remember being very taken with the story, but remember only basics about the tale and need a refresher. ( )
  Lit_Cat | Dec 9, 2017 |
I very much enjoyed the story - the language got in the way at times and forced me to read more slowly. Now I can more fully appreciate why this book is still considered a classic. ( )
  TerryLewis | Jun 12, 2017 |
a pointless story about wealth, revenge, justice and love ( )
  BookstoogeLT | Dec 10, 2016 |
For sheer enjoyment, this is probably more of a 3-star book but I found it really interesting to read and think about Hawthorne writing when he did so I gave it 4 stars. There is a lot that is "of its time" in the novel but there is just as much that is as apt today as it was 150 years ago. ( )
  ltfitch1 | Jun 5, 2016 |
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Half-way down a by-street of one of our New England towns, stands a rusty wooden house, - with seven acutely peaked gables facing towards varioius points of the compass, and a ahuge, clusted chimney in the midst.
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Do Not Combine: This is a "Norton Critical Edition", it is a unique work with significant added material, including essays and background materials. Do not combine with other editions of the work. Please maintain the phrase "Norton Critical Edition" in the Canonical Title and Publisher Series fields.
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0393924769, Paperback)

This all-new edition of Hawthorne’s celebrated 1851 novel is based on The Ohio State University Press’s Centenary Edition of the Works of Nathaniel Hawthorne.

It is accompanied by thorough explanatory annotations and an insightful introduction to the novel and antebellum culture by Robert S. Levine.

"Contexts" brings together a generous selection of primary materials intended to provide readers with background on the novel’s central themes.  Historical documents include accounts of Salem’s history by Thomas Maule, Robert Calef, Joseph B. Felt, and Charles W. Upham, which Hawthorne drew on for The House of the Seven Gables.  The importance of the house in antebellum America—as a manifestation of the body, a site of genealogical history, and a symbol of the republic’s middle class—is explored through the diverse writings of William Andrus Alcott, Edgar Allan Poe, and J. H. Agnew, among others.  The impact of technological developments on the novel, especially of daguerreotypy, is considered through the writings of Ralph Waldo Emerson, Gustave de Beaumont, and Alexis de Tocqueville, among others.  Also included are two of Hawthorne’s literary sketches—"Alice Doane’s Appeal" and "The Old Apple Dealer"—that demonstrate the continuity of Hawthorne’s style, from his earlier periodical writing to his later career as a novelist.

"Criticism" provides a comprehensive overview of the critical commentary on the novel from its publication to the present.  Among the twenty-seven critics represented are Herman Melville, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Henry James, Nina Baym, Eric Sundquist, Richard H. Millington, Alan Trachtenberg, Amy Schrager Lang, and Christopher Castiglia.

A Chronology and Selected Bibliography are also included.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:07:15 -0400)

(see all 6 descriptions)

It is accompanied by thorough explanatory annotations and an insightful introduction to the novel and antebellum culture by Robert S. Levine. "Contexts" brings together a generous selection of primary materials intended to provide readers with background on the novel's central themes. Historical documents include accounts of Salem's history by Thomas Maule, Robert Calef, Joseph B. Felt, and Charles W. Upham, which Hawthorne drew on for The House of the Seven Gables.? The importance of the house in antebellum America--as a manifestation of the body, a site of genealogical history, and a symbol of the republic's middle class--is explored through the diverse writings of William Andrus Alcott, Edgar Allan Poe, and J. H. Agnew, among others.? The impact of technological developments on the novel, especially of daguerreotypy, is considered through the writings of Ralph Waldo Emerson, Gustave de Beaumont, and Alexis de Tocqueville, among others.? Also included are two of Hawthorne's literary sketches--"Alice Doane's Appeal" and "The Old Apple Dealer"--that demonstrate the continuity of Hawthorne's style, from his earlier periodical writing to his later career as a novelist. "Criticism" provides a comprehensive overview of the critical commentary on the novel from its publication to the present.? Among the twenty-seven critics represented are Herman Melville, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Henry James, Nina Baym, Eric Sundquist, Richard H. Millington, Alan Trachtenberg, Amy Schrager Lang, and Christopher Castiglia. A Chronology and Selected Bibliography are also included.… (more)

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