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A Thousand Days in Tuscany: A Bittersweet…
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A Thousand Days in Tuscany: A Bittersweet Adventure (edition 2005)

by Marlena De Blasi

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400826,709 (3.57)2
Member:SeriousGrace
Title:A Thousand Days in Tuscany: A Bittersweet Adventure
Authors:Marlena De Blasi
Info:Ballantine Books (2005), Edition: Reprint, Paperback
Collections:Your library
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Tags:Marlene De Blasi, MBL, Tuscany, nonfiction, challenge, Italy

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A Thousand Days in Tuscany: A Bittersweet Adventure by Marlena de Blasi

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Showing 1-5 of 8 (next | show all)
A most excellent read. Heart warming stories. Wonderful recipes. I love her work. ( )
  Harrod | Nov 7, 2012 |
After reading "A Thousand Days in Venice" a few years ago, I found this one and remembered what a treasure "Venice" had been, and I couldn't help but wonder what Marlena and Fernando were doing, wherever their journey carried them. The subtitle - "A Bittersweet Adventure" - is most certainly apt; this being a book that would probably make just about anyone feel a bit sad and introspective. Nevertheless, my interest remains piqued and I will be tracking down de Blasi's next memoir to see where they went next and who they met next. And, of course, to get a few more glimpses into the scrumptious foods and drinks she so temptingly describes.

Here are a few notable quotations from the book:

"It's the table and the bed that count in life. And everything else we do, we do so we can get back to the table, back to the bed."

"Maybe the only thing that matters is to make our lives last as long as we do. You know, to make a life last until it ends, to make all the parts come out even, like when you rub the last piece of bread in the last drop of oil on your plate and eat it with the last sip of wine in your glass."

"Beware of the tyranny of the giver. The giver has more cards than the getter. Or perceives it so. Yet how often is the giver giving to gain control, or at the least, the sanction to plunder the givee's life, how and when he may." ( )
  susanaudrey | Dec 26, 2011 |
Marlena De Blasi has my dream job! She writes, travels and eats. Perfect. This book inspired me to make a Tuscan Flatbread with sea salt and rosemary. For full review and a pretty photo of my loaf of flatbread, check me out here:
http://www.novelmeals.com/2011/08/thousand-days-in-tuscany-by-marlena-de.html ( )
  SquirrelHead | Aug 28, 2011 |
I initially enjoyed this book for it's sheer indulgence, but the utopian descriptions of Tuscan life struck me as tedious and naive. I soon found myself wishing that something realistic and horrible would happen... I won't be finding it out, since I've shelved this one for the time being. ( )
  bluepenguin1980 | Sep 24, 2009 |
My family is Tuscan. Oh how she captures the peccadillos of the region and the people. And the food! ( )
  authorknows | May 9, 2009 |
Showing 1-5 of 8 (next | show all)
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Dolce e Salata and Tuscan Secrets are both different Australian editions of A Thousand Days in Tuscany.
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0345481097, Paperback)

They had met and married on perilously short acquaintance, she an American chef and food writer, he a Venetian banker. Now they were taking another audacious leap, unstitching their ties with exquisite Venice to live in a roughly renovated stable in Tuscany.

Once again, it was love at first sight. Love for the timeless countryside and the ancient village of San Casciano dei Bagni, for the local vintage and the magnificent cooking, for the Tuscan sky and the friendly church bells. Love especially for old Barlozzo, the village mago, who escorts the newcomers to Tuscany’s seasonal festivals; gives them roasted country bread drizzled with just-pressed olive oil; invites them to gather chestnuts, harvest grapes, hunt truffles; and teaches them to caress the simple pleasures of each precious day. It’s Barlozzo who guides them across the minefields of village history and into the warm and fiercely beating heart of love itself.

A Thousand Days in Tuscany is set in one of the most beautiful places on earth–and tucked into its fragrant corners are luscious recipes (including one for the only true bruschetta) directly from the author’s private collection.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:24:36 -0400)

(see all 2 descriptions)

A transplanted American chef and food writer continues her story of her life in Italy, describing her and her husband's move to rural Tuscany and detailing their participation in local life and culinary discoveries.

(summary from another edition)

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