HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Clouds of Witness by Dorothy L. Sayers
Loading...

Clouds of Witness (original 1926; edition 1995)

by Dorothy L. Sayers

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
2,488582,434 (3.83)159
Member:Zaklog
Title:Clouds of Witness
Authors:Dorothy L. Sayers
Info:HarperTorch (1995), Mass Market Paperback, 288 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:
Tags:20th century, fiction, novel, mystery, British

Work details

Clouds of Witness by Dorothy L. Sayers (1926)

Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 159 mentions

English (57)  Swedish (1)  All languages (58)
Showing 1-5 of 57 (next | show all)
Three cheers for Lord Peter Wimsey and Dorothy Sayers' witty writing! ( )
  Oodles | Feb 16, 2016 |
Clouds Of Witness (1926) by Dorothy Sayer

is book #2 in the Lord Peter Wimsey mystery series.

I hesitate to rate and do a thorough evaluation because I'm not familiar with the series
and have little experience with the English cozy subgenre.
I'm assuming this qualifies as cozy.

The subject is serious--Peter's brother, the Duke of Denver, is accused of murder.
Elements of the story and Peter's character provide comic relief and a pleasing puzzle throughout.
Here's an example:
You're introduced to the intricate layout of the English court and the trial procedure.
and suddenly, out of nowhere, a witness debunks her previous testimony and "reporters looked up suddenly like dogs expecting a biscuit"
and Sir Wigmore knocked his brief over the head of the clerk of the house of lords sitting below."

Lord Peter had a habit of addressing his sister Mary as "old thing" or Polly.
You had to chuckle.

Clues are plentiful as are "red herring" characters.
Occasionally I needed the dictionary and a repeat reading of a colloquial "string of thoughts."

I ordered this book as a trade paperback and found the text was so tiny that it was headache material and I gave up trying to read it.
Also, there were huge spaces between each paragraph....why?
and, there is no publisher listed/mentioned anywhere in the book.
It simply said --printed and manufactured in the United States Of America.

I needed to read this for my F2F group.
My E reader version was 644 pages.....
Needless to say....I'm glad this experience is over.
  pennsylady | Jan 29, 2016 |
Clouds of Witness opens with Lord Peter returning from a vacation in Corsica, on the advice of Sir Julian Freke in the wake of the "Battersea Mystery" (ie, the events in Whose Body?). His leisurely stopover in Paris turns into a rush home because his brother, the Duke of Denver has been arrested for the murder of Captain Denis Cathcart, who was engaged to their younger sister, Lady Mary Wimsey. The three of them, along with some additional guests (2 couples and Freddy Arbuthnot, a frequent supporting character) were staying at Riddlesdale Lodge in Yorkshire, supposedly for a hunting holiday. This is the closest view we get of Lord Peter’s family, and the book where Charles and Mary meet. The events leading up to the death of Captain Cathcart are a collision course of hidden agendas on the parts of Gerald, Duke of Denver, Captain Cathcart, and Lady Mary. Both Gerald and Mary have something to hide, leading to confusion, suspicion, perjury, stonewalling, and false confession, not to mention misunderstandings, mistaken assumptions, and misperceptions of the various bystander witnesses. Lord Peter and Charles must go to great lengths to follow the case: the wild moors of Yorkshire, Captain Cathcart’s apartment in Paris, the Soviet Club in London. Mr Murbles and Sir Impey Biggs are both frustrated with the lack of cooperation by their ducal client. The case goes all the way to trial in the House of Lords, with all of the archaic pageantry and tabloid headlines. It’s played for maximum melodrama, including a secret witness and an eleventh hour overseas flight in a two-seater airplane during a thunderstorm to secure the critical evidence and the courtroom denouement. ( )
  justchris | Jan 18, 2016 |
This is probably my second favorite of the Wimsey novels, after Murder Must Advertise, particularly for the trial before the House of Lords --a tradition now ended by later legal reform. ( )
  antiquary | Dec 26, 2015 |
Lord Peter Wimsey's older brother has just been arrested for murdering his sister's fiancee, whose body was found in the family ancestral home. Lord Peter shows up to find that his brother isn't cooperating with the police and his sister's version of the night doesn't hold up under scrutiny. With little help from his family, Lord Peter, manservant Bunter and police friend Parker have to piece together the dead man's past and childish Lady Mary's movements on the night he died.
This is my second Lord Peter book, the first being Lord Peter Views the Body a few years ago. It's interesting and often funny, and the clues and red herrings abound. I know there was a time when the upper class English thought it hip to drop their "g"s to sound like hillbillies, I guess, but Lord Peter can barely get a complete word out, and it's kind of annoying to read a sentences filled with apostrophes. But a good mystery that went on slightly too long. ( )
  mstrust | Nov 10, 2015 |
Showing 1-5 of 57 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors (8 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Sayers, Dorothy L.primary authorall editionsconfirmed
Barcilon, RogerCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Bayer, OttoTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Bergvall, SonjaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Bleck, CathieCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Carmichael, IanNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
George, ElizabethIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Griffini, Grazia MariaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Michal, MarieCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Information from the German Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Lord Peter Wimsey stretched himself luxuriously between the sheets provided by the Hotel Meurice.
Quotations
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Please distinguish between this mystery novel, Cloud Of Witnesses by Dorothy L. Sayers (1926), and the similarly-titled anthology of essays, Cloud Of Witnesses edited by Jim Wallis and Joyce Hollyday (1991; rev'd 2005). Thank you.
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language
Information from the German Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (1)

Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0061043532, Mass Market Paperback)

Rustic old Riddlesdale Lodge was a Wimsey family retreat filled with country pleasures and the thrill of the hunt -- until the game turned up human and quite dead. He lay among the chrysanthemums, wore slippers and a dinner jacket and was Lord Peter's brother-in-law-to-be. His accused murderer was Wimsey's own brother, and if murder set all in the family wasn't enough to boggle the unflappable Lord Wimsey, perhaps a few twists of fate would be -- a mysterious vanishing midnight letter from Egypt...a grieving fiancee with suitcase in hand...and a bullet destined for one very special Wimsey.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:14:36 -0400)

(see all 3 descriptions)

Lord Peter is on vacation when he hears that a dead body has been found at the Wimsey family retreat, and that Lord Peter's brother, the Duke of Denver, is being held for the crime. The dead man? Their sister's fiance.? Lord Peter must clear his brother's name to avoid the death penalty. There is overwhelming circumstantial evidence against the Duke, but Lord Peter firmly believes that his brother is innocent and begins his own investigation into the murder. Can Lord Peter find the truth in time to save his brother and the family name?… (more)

(summary from another edition)

» see all 14 descriptions

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.83)
0.5
1 5
1.5 2
2 14
2.5 8
3 150
3.5 43
4 252
4.5 27
5 116

Audible.com

An edition of this book was published by Audible.com.

See editions

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

Help/FAQs | About | Privacy/Terms | Blog | Store | Contact | LibraryThing.com | APIs | WikiThing | Common Knowledge | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | 8 books! | Top bar: Always visible