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The Tomb (Repairman Jack Novels) by F. Paul…
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The Tomb (Repairman Jack Novels) (original 1984; edition 2011)

by F. Paul Wilson

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912319,640 (3.81)34
Member:MdR87
Title:The Tomb (Repairman Jack Novels)
Authors:F. Paul Wilson
Info:Tor Books (2011), Edition: Reprint, Paperback, 432 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:****
Tags:None

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The Tomb by F. Paul Wilson (1984)

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Loved the book...

Now, can someone please explain to me why the title is "The Tomb" when there is no real "tomb" in the book? I've read that the publisher wanted Wilson to change the original title from "Rakoshi"...but why "The Tomb"?

Great book...outstanding character...excellent action and pacing...really stupid title. ( )
  ExLibrisVita | Oct 1, 2013 |
I feel like I start a lot of these reviews with, "I like this book better than I thought I would..." And if I have, it's because I've been reading a lot of books that are either book club selections or recommended by someone else. My brother has been harping on me to read this book for years. When I had the chance to meet F. Paul Wilson last weekend at C2E2 (he was super cool), I figured I better get cracking.

Repairman Jack is in the business of vigilante justice. He's kind of like The Punisher, except with a narrower scope of rage (he doesn't shoot people in the face for littering, for example) and a better sense of humor. Jack fixes things for people when the police either don't do their job or don't do the right kind of job. When someone commits a crime, Jack makes sure they pay in the appropriate way -none of this trial by judge and jury crap.

In The Tomb, the first Repairman Jack book, jack is hired for two jobs: 1. Retrieve a stolen necklace and maybe kick the ass of the guy who stole it since he beat up an old lady in the process. 2. Find his ex-girlfriend's missing aunt. As the story goes on, Jack realizes these two jobs are connected. And there's some funny business going on. For example, how did Gia's aunt disappear from a secure third story bedroom without a trace? And just why is this necklace so dang important - it's just iron and topaz?

This was a quick and easy read and a little outside of my normal fare. But my brother promises there will be all kinds of apocalyptic shit going down in later books. The only reason I didn't give this five stars is that there isn't much rereadability factor. But I had a good time with the first read. And now I have to go punch my brother for getting me hooked on a 16 book series when I have too many other things to do... ( )
  gypsycab79 | Jun 25, 2013 |
3.5 stars but I'm rounding up to 4 because that's what I would have given it if I'd read it with 1984 sensibilities which was when it was published. It was that era when only lip-service was given to equality. It was "accepted" that women were equal and strong and smart but all that meant was having them say a few smart things or show interest in what was going on or just having femal characters. The same went for people of color. We weren't there yet for any other minority groups.

So Wilson's women are fairly smart, they are strong in that they want to know what's going on, they demand answers, and one tries to find answers for herself. But they aren't really strong in that they don't really do more than talk, their legs turn to rubber or wood when a man is there to do the heavy lifting, and they freeze when things get terrifying (except for one heady moment when one woman actually goes first into a scary passageway, although she does have a magic item that renders her invisible to the bad things she at least went first after panicking and refusing to go for at least a full paragraph!).

Later this same woman hears something shocking and is so dazed she needs to be carried, even though Jack is fighting for their lives, terrified by and running from something he knows nothing about and she has known all her life. I actually found the other woman, Gia, a bit more realistic. I completely understood why she left him and why she stayed away despite her love for him. I probably would have done everything I could so he couldn't find me.

The writing was smooth, the pacing was good, and the monsters were scary. I really liked Jack. He was fallible. He didn't like to exercise but he forced himself to in order to stay alive. He admitted to himself when he was afraid and when he was in over his head and it was genuine, not a machismo kind of "ah hell, this bugger would make anyone scared" or the fake humility that is also common in urban fantasy. He's also strong and fast like a man of his skills should be.

I really liked the subtle emotions, though. I really felt his grief when someone he loved was in danger. I felt his love for the little girl. I felt his confusion and feelings for both women. I really like that he had feelings at all, although he seems very alone to me. Other than Gia, he only has one friend that shows up in the book, a delightful Jewish character himself, and the lone 1980's nod to multiculturalism. I hope Jack is less alone in later books.

Other things: I loved the junky home he lives in that everyone else hates; it's so unusual for a character in fiction who's in this kind of role to be tied down with tons of stuff.
I hated that a woman let's a man go off to rescue her kid without even trying to go with him.
I found that some things were told to the reader that should have been immediately obvious to Jack but even after he was almost explicity shown he didn't get: the chocolates were tainted.
It was a little odd that the creatures could climb down a ramp into the hold when they returned from hunting but couldn't get out on their own.
There was a really nice touch at the end where someone turns to look at the bomb but now I can't read my notes. I think it was Jack but why was that special? I don't know.

Overall, it was a solid read that kept me turning the pages and wanting more. Since the sequel was published 14 years later, I'm going to give it a go. If the women are a little less fragile and wimpy I think I'll really love this series. ( )
  maybedog | Apr 5, 2013 |
3.5 stars but I'm rounding up to 4 because that's what I would have given it if I'd read it with 1984 sensibilities which was when it was published. It was that era when only lip-service was given to equality. It was "accepted" that women were equal and strong and smart but all that meant was having them say a few smart things or show interest in what was going on or just having femal characters. The same went for people of color. We weren't there yet for any other minority groups.

So Wilson's women are fairly smart, they are strong in that they want to know what's going on, they demand answers, and one tries to find answers for herself. But they aren't really strong in that they don't really do more than talk, their legs turn to rubber or wood when a man is there to do the heavy lifting, and they freeze when things get terrifying (except for one heady moment when one woman actually goes first into a scary passageway, although she does have a magic item that renders her invisible to the bad things she at least went first after panicking and refusing to go for at least a full paragraph!).

Later this same woman hears something shocking and is so dazed she needs to be carried, even though Jack is fighting for their lives, terrified by and running from something he knows nothing about and she has known all her life. I actually found the other woman, Gia, a bit more realistic. I completely understood why she left him and why she stayed away despite her love for him. I probably would have done everything I could so he couldn't find me.

The writing was smooth, the pacing was good, and the monsters were scary. I really liked Jack. He was fallible. He didn't like to exercise but he forced himself to in order to stay alive. He admitted to himself when he was afraid and when he was in over his head and it was genuine, not a machismo kind of "ah hell, this bugger would make anyone scared" or the fake humility that is also common in urban fantasy. He's also strong and fast like a man of his skills should be.

I really liked the subtle emotions, though. I really felt his grief when someone he loved was in danger. I felt his love for the little girl. I felt his confusion and feelings for both women. I really like that he had feelings at all, although he seems very alone to me. Other than Gia, he only has one friend that shows up in the book, a delightful Jewish character himself, and the lone 1980's nod to multiculturalism. I hope Jack is less alone in later books.

Other things: I loved the junky home he lives in that everyone else hates; it's so unusual for a character in fiction who's in this kind of role to be tied down with tons of stuff.
I hated that a woman let's a man go off to rescue her kid without even trying to go with him.
I found that some things were told to the reader that should have been immediately obvious to Jack but even after he was almost explicity shown he didn't get: the chocolates were tainted.
It was a little odd that the creatures could climb down a ramp into the hold when they returned from hunting but couldn't get out on their own.
There was a really nice touch at the end where someone turns to look at the bomb but now I can't read my notes. I think it was Jack but why was that special? I don't know.

Overall, it was a solid read that kept me turning the pages and wanting more. Since the sequel was published 14 years later, I'm going to give it a go. If the women are a little less fragile and wimpy I think I'll really love this series. ( )
  maybedog | Apr 5, 2013 |
This is the second novel of the Adversary Cycle and the first novel of Repairman Jack. Repairman Jack is a fix-it man living in New York City. Jack does not repair "things". He repairs situations. He is hired by a man to find a necklace that was stolen; at the same time, his ex-girlfriend contacts Jack to help locate her missing aunt. Jack is resourceful and smart and follows the rabbit hole of these two cases to their surprising and fiery conclusion.
This is a very enjoyable book. The character of Repairman Jack is very interesting and complex. This book begins as a basic detective novel, with Jack working to solve problems for people, and as the novel develops, supernatural forces begin to intercede in the real world. ( )
  burningtodd | Nov 5, 2012 |
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Epigraph
Dedication
to my own Vickys: Jennifer and Meggan
First words
Repairman Jack woke with light in his eyes, white noise in his ears, and an ache in his back.
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Disambiguation notice
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Haiku summary
This Repairman Jack
Won't fix your television.
He fixes problems.
(yoyogod)

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0812580370, Mass Market Paperback)

Much to the chagrin of his girlfriend, Gia, Repairman Jack doesn't deal with electronic appliances-he fixes situations for people, often putting himself in deadly danger. His latest project is recovering a stolen necklace, which carries with it an ancient curse that may unleash a horde of Bengali demons. Jack is used to danger, but this time Gia's daughter Vicky is threatened. Can Jack overcome the curse of the yellow necklace and bring Vicky safely back home?

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:34:09 -0400)

(see all 6 descriptions)

A repairman Jack thriller. Follow Hosts.

(summary from another edition)

» see all 2 descriptions

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