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First and Second Samuel by Walter…
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350146,360 (4)None
Member:Michael_Fincher
Title:First and Second Samuel
Authors:Walter Brueggemann
Info:Louisville, Ky. : John Knox Press, c1990.
Collections:Your library, Office
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Tags:Bible, Commentary, Hebrew Bible

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First and Second Samuel by Walter Brueggemann

  1. 00
    The First Book of Samuel by David Toshio Tsumura (StephenBarkley)
    StephenBarkley: These commentaries compliment each other well: Tsumura is more focused on the technicalities of the text while Brueggemann is more focused on broader narrative themes and theology.
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The books of Samuel describe a critical shift in the life of Israel.

When the book begins, Israel had suffered through a series of increasingly impotent judges. The loose confederation of tribes increasingly wandered from God and did what seemed right in their own eyes. Into this world Hannah struggled and conceived a child—Samuel. When the book ends, Israel is a monarchy under the rule of King David, the second of two Kings Samuel anointed.

Here is the critical shift: Israel has gone from being a nation under YHWH to a nation under human kings.

Brueggemann’s commentary is excellent. He presents a close reading of the story of Samuel, Saul, and David with an eye for detail. All the political nuances which might escape the casual reader of scripture are brought to the forefront for consideration.

In Brueggemann’s reading, the heroes and villains of scripture are no one-sided caricatures. They are complicated, as human beings always are. David is no mere Sunday School hero—he is at the same time politically shrewd and spiritually attuned. He is human, warts and all.

The Interpretation commentary series is not overly technical. I would encourage any thoughtful Christian with a love for scripture to pick up this gem and read it alongside the text. ( )
  StephenBarkley | Jul 10, 2017 |
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