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Do androids dream of electric sheep? (original 1968; edition 1997)

by Philip K. Dick

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11,100267253 (3.97)2 / 428
Member:AlanPoulter
Title:Do androids dream of electric sheep?
Authors:Philip K. Dick
Info:London : HarperCollins 1997, c1968.
Collections:Your library
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Tags:science fiction

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Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? by Philip K. Dick (1968)

1001 (51) 1001 books (46) 20th century (73) American (67) American literature (58) androids (209) artificial intelligence (59) Blade Runner (89) classic (73) cyberpunk (164) dystopia (298) dystopian (56) ebook (51) fiction (964) future (48) made into movie (59) movie (48) novel (200) own (49) paperback (54) Philip K. Dick (69) pkd (53) read (228) robots (128) science fiction (2,343) sf (299) SF Masterworks (49) sff (105) speculative fiction (51) to-read (203)
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English (250)  French (5)  Spanish (4)  Italian (2)  Polish (1)  Swedish (1)  Dutch (1)  Romanian (1)  Portuguese (1)  All languages (266)
Showing 1-5 of 250 (next | show all)
I just could not care about the characters. The only one i remotely cared about was the "chicken-head" guy. There was no depth to the characters and the whole and Mercerism just felt too random and undeveloped. So many people loved this and I really tried, but I could not get into it at all. Rare case where the movie is better than the book. ( )
  sffstorm | Jul 2, 2014 |
There is so much more here that I want to know about than the story tells me: the open antebellum nostalgia for slavery coupled with androids and a new colonialism, the hints at how miserable life actually is off earth, the details of Mercerism. I really wanted this book to about 200 pages longer and to have those 200 pages tap into the world-building that seem so rich and well thought out that we only glimpse here. Dick's concept of androids is fascinating; I am at once sympathetic and so deeply repulsed in that horrific scene with the spider; their biology, their sociopathy. ( )
  endlesserror | Jun 21, 2014 |
Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep by Philip K. Dick follows Rick Deckard as he must hunt down and "retire" (that is kill) six rogue androids that have made it back to the barren wasteland that is now earth, on which little animal and human life remains. Dick explores the common trope regarding the worth of a non-human and decides that empathy is the key trait that defines humanity; there are several times when the comparison between androids and sociopaths is made. This discussion of identity and what it means to be human is the recurring idea in Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep, and indeed in most other works by Dick.

This book is definitely a product of the 1960s, but that does not lessen Dick's ability to weave a intriguing story which does raise questions pertinent to today's robotic industries.

( )
  xuebi | May 30, 2014 |
Intricate little book. It's a testament to the novelist that he can make me feel sick over the death of a spider.

I've only ready a few of Dick's novels, but the themes of paranoia and malleability of reality work wonderfully in "Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?" (Androids). When I first saw "Bladerunner," I was too young to catch the question of Decker's nature -- I never would have missed it had I read the novel first. The nature of reality is at question here, but Dick handles everything lightly. Nothing ever felt didactic.

The reality of truth, commodification of reality, impact of mass-media -- it's all here, but wrapped up inside a taut little detective novel that moves briskly along.

Overall, the novel feels feverish to me. Things happen fast, perhaps too fast from a realistic viewpoint, but the viewpoint in the novel is plastic. So I guess that makes it a good sort of fever. ( )
  Michael.McGuire | May 22, 2014 |
I recently decided to read this "classic" story. Considering they had based a movie upon it, Bladerunner with Harrison Ford, I was expecting more. The story was enjoyable but at the end I was left wondering, "Is that it?"

It is a quick read, and if you have some time to kill it would not be a waste of it, but it is not quite the book I was expecting.
( )
  SeanHarp | May 18, 2014 |
Showing 1-5 of 250 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (62 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Dick, Philip K.primary authorall editionsconfirmed
Brick, ScottNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Dougoud, JacquelineTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Duranti, RiccardoTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Goodfellow, PeterCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Michniewicz, SueCover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Moore, ChrisCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Struzen, DrewCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Wölfl, NorbertTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Zelazny, RogerIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Epigraph
And still I dream he treads the lawn,
walking ghostly in the dew,
pierced by my glad singing through.
~ Yeats
Dedication
To Tim and Serena Powers, my dearest friends
To Maren Augusta Bergrud
August 10, 1923 - June 14, 1967
First words
A merry little surge of electricity piped by automatic alarm from the mood organ beside his bed awakened Rick Deckard.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0345404475, Paperback)

"The most consistently brilliant science fiction writer in the world."
--John Brunner

THE INSPIRATION FOR BLADERUNNER. . .

Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? was published in 1968. Grim and foreboding, even today it is a masterpiece ahead of its time.

By 2021, the World War had killed millions, driving entire species into extinction and sending mankind off-planet. Those who remained coveted any living creature, and for people who couldn't afford one, companies built incredibly realistic simulacrae: horses, birds, cats, sheep. . . They even built humans.

Emigrées to Mars received androids so sophisticated it was impossible to tell them from true men or women. Fearful of the havoc these artificial humans could wreak, the government banned them from Earth. But when androids didn't want to be identified, they just blended in.

Rick Deckard was an officially sanctioned bounty hunter whose job was to find rogue androids, and to retire them. But cornered, androids tended to fight back, with deadly results.

"[Dick] sees all the sparkling and terrifying possibilities. . . that other authors shy away from."
--Paul Williams, Rolling Stone

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 14:04:48 -0400)

(see all 6 descriptions)

THE INSPIRATION FOR BLADERUNNER. . . Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? was published in 1968. Grim and foreboding, even today it is a masterpiece ahead of its time. By 2021, the World War had killed millions, driving entire species into extinction and sending mankind off-planet. Those who remained coveted any living creature, and for people who couldn't afford one, companies built incredibly realistic simulacrae: horses, birds, cats, sheep. . . They even built humans. Emigrees to Mars received androids so sophisticated it was impossible to tell them from true men or women. Fearful of the havoc these artificial humans could wreak, the government banned them from Earth. But when androids didn't want to be identified, they just blended in. Rick Deckard was an officially sanctioned bounty hunter whose job was to find rogue androids, and to retire them. But cornered, androids tended to fight back, with deadly results.… (more)

(summary from another edition)

» see all 14 descriptions

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