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Roadkill by Rob Thurman
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Roadkill

by Rob Thurman

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346950,385 (3.89)8
When the Gypsy queen who cursed them needs their help in finding a stolen coffin, P.I.s Cal and Niko Leandros must put aside their hatred and find this ancient vessel that contains the Plague of the World before it is too late.

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Showing 1-5 of 9 (next | show all)
Road trip!

All gypsy clans have a burden, and the Sarzo Clan has lost theirs: a centuries-old ex-healer known as the Plague of the World, locked in a sealed iron coffin. They want Cal and Niko to get him back for them. Only problem? Getting close to the dying thief - who's headed for the west coast trailing dead bodies - means a slow and painful death by disease. Packed into Niko's ancient beater with a Puck, a dead but deadly cat, and two werewolves, trailed by a camper full of gypsies, the brothers head west... it's gonna be a long trip.

Yay! We get to catch up with Catcher and Rafferty! Not to mention getting Cal and Niko out of their element. And who doesn't love a mummified, killer cat with an attitude and an earring? Entertaining as always. ( )
  SunnySD | Jul 18, 2013 |
This one was a little too introspective and talky compared to previous books in the series and less action, sometimes taking up only a couple of paragraphs. The plot was fine if a little predictable. The final battle wasn't one of her best, not enough characters almost dying, but it was good. :)

But those Brothers moments just get me and there were several although I wanted more. Instead we got moments between cousins who were raised as brothers, and a delightful Wolf who was more dog-like than wolf with his happy-go-lucky personality. We also get a sweet m/m romance as well that had me "oh" sound you make when an adorable puppy face-plants: kind of "that's so adorable it makes me want to cry."

Delilah is back, who I can't stand, but we aren't supposed to like her as much this time around. I do like that she's lethal and can hold her own against many werewolves as a woman because there are so few women in this series but the only other woman in this story is evil.

My favorite parts, though, this time around involved Goodfellow. I've always loved his character anyway but he's vulnerable and confused here. He is wrestling with a big decision and trying to be celibate during the trip as a test to himself. His struggles are both hilarious and sympathetic as he is tempted by everything and everyone and is crabby as a result. But we see more of his goodness even if Cal doesn't always give him credit for it.

But the best part? The mummy cat. Now everyone knows I am not a cat person--they torture me with love on purpose as I am horribly allergic and they ALWAYS come to weave around my legs and climb on me; not anyone else, me. Most are strategically evil or stupid or both. But this cat is amazing. It's death on dead paws and everyone is scared of it. It's also really smart. The book explains why Robin is so enamored of it but I'm sold. I want a mummy cat too. I'm pretty sure I wouldn't be allergic either. ( )
  maybedog | Apr 5, 2013 |
This one was a little too introspective and talky compared to previous books in the series and less action, sometimes taking up only a couple of paragraphs. The plot was fine if a little predictable. The final battle wasn't one of her best, not enough characters almost dying, but it was good. :)

But those Brothers moments just get me and there were several although I wanted more. Instead we got moments between cousins who were raised as brothers, and a delightful Wolf who was more dog-like than wolf with his happy-go-lucky personality. We also get a sweet m/m romance as well that had me "oh" sound you make when an adorable puppy face-plants: kind of "that's so adorable it makes me want to cry."

Delilah is back, who I can't stand, but we aren't supposed to like her as much this time around. I do like that she's lethal and can hold her own against many werewolves as a woman because there are so few women in this series but the only other woman in this story is evil.

My favorite parts, though, this time around involved Goodfellow. I've always loved his character anyway but he's vulnerable and confused here. He is wrestling with a big decision and trying to be celibate during the trip as a test to himself. His struggles are both hilarious and sympathetic as he is tempted by everything and everyone and is crabby as a result. But we see more of his goodness even if Cal doesn't always give him credit for it.

But the best part? The mummy cat. Now everyone knows I am not a cat person--they torture me with love on purpose as I am horribly allergic and they ALWAYS come to weave around my legs and climb on me; not anyone else, me. Most are strategically evil or stupid or both. But this cat is amazing. It's death on dead paws and everyone is scared of it. It's also really smart. The book explains why Robin is so enamored of it but I'm sold. I want a mummy cat too. I'm pretty sure I wouldn't be allergic either. ( )
  maybedog | Apr 5, 2013 |
For me, this is a character-driven series. I'm rarely fully invested in the plot, and this installment was no exception. Which is probably just as well, because of all the road trip stories I've ever read, I've only enjoyed maybe two of them.

Much to my surprise, I was really moved by the sequences with Catcher and Rafferty. Having lived with a close family member who suffered severe brain damage, the grief and guilt expressed by both members of the relationship felt very real to me and moved me to tears a few times. (That said, the POV switches between Cal and Catcher were occasionally a bit disconcerting. Especially near the end, their voices were written so similarly that it threw me off a few times.)

Robin was not as entertaining as he normally is. This actually felt kind of like filler for a future installment of the series, in terms of his development. Ditto for Niko, and Promise wasn't present at all.

Cal... I'm not sure. Some parts were fun, some were repetitive, some were good but fell a little flat in the shadow of the Catcher storyline. Overall though, he's continuing to grow in a way that I find interesting, so I'm looking forward to the next in the series. ( )
  thewalkinggirl | Jun 13, 2012 |
A few books back, half-human Cal and his brother Niko had dealings with an ancient Rom woman--dealings that almost lead to Niko's death. Now the old crone is back, this time with a job offer. Someone has stolen a coffin from her clan, and this isn't just any coffin. It contains Suyolak, the Rom who once-upon-a-time unleashed the Black Plague for kicks. Suyolak is a healer turned anti-healer. Cal and Niko reach out to their old healer friend, Rafferty, who has problems of his own--a werewolf cousin who is stuck as a wolf. Together they take to the American highway to stop Suyolak from popping free.

My feelings on this book are mixed. On one hand, I love the concept of Suyolak. I love writing healer characters, so it was fun to see how Thurman handled their powers. She also had a gift for pulling out very obscure, nasty creatures from mythology and bringing them to life in horrid detail. Reading these books can be educational. The action stays consistent, too.

Then there's the bad stuff. Rafferty and Catcher had larger roles in this book, with some chapters from Catcher's point of view (which made his ending far too predictable). The problem is that too many characters sounded the same. They were almost all male, bitter, profane, and unnaturally-witty at all times. As it is, Cal can be a bit too whiny and rambling, but here it felt like overkill with so many characters alike. Even Robin Goodfellow, the perpetually horny puck, was whinier in this book as he attempted monogamy. I also missed the balancing presence of Promise, Niko's girlfriend, who was omitted despite how their relationship was supposedly mended.

I'll still continue with the series when the next book is released in March, but I hope it remedies some of the narrative problems. ( )
1 vote ladycato | Jan 9, 2011 |
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