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Beat Poets (Everyman's Library Pocket Poets)
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Beat Poets (Everyman's Library Pocket Poets) (edition 2002)

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123297,888 (3.81)4
Member:msmullins
Title:Beat Poets (Everyman's Library Pocket Poets)
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Info:New York: Alfred A. Knopf: 2002. 250 p. ; 17 cm.
Collections:Your library
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Tags:american poetry, beat generation, everyman's library pocket poet, poetry

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Beat Poets (Everyman's Library Pocket Poets) by Carmela Ciuraru (Editor)

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The best thing about Beat Poets, edited by Carmela Ciuraru is that it reminds us of beats and near-beats who are now less remembered than the canonical few. I was happy to discover or rediscover poets like Marie Ponsot, Barbara Guest, and Denise Levertov (so much for poor old Kerouac's description of what the Beats were doing as "the pure masculine urge to freely sing"), and to be reminded that Gregory Corso was more—a lot more—than a loud and irritating drunk. The selection of the poems is often odd—none of Gary Snyder's best, for example, and only part of "Howl"—and there is no attempt to provide readers with even the barest details of when the poems were written or who the poets were (something one might be forgiven for expecting in a book called not "Beat Poetry" but "Beat Poets"). The Beat Book is a better, more richly contextualized, and less idiosyncratic collection.
  dcozy | Jul 3, 2011 |
This book doesn't give nearly enough of a sampling of beat poetry, and it leaves out some of the best poems. ( )
  OpheliasNightmare | Apr 26, 2007 |
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0375413324, Hardcover)

This rousing anthology features the work of more than twenty-five writers from the great twentieth-century countercultural literary movement. Writing with an audacious swagger and an iconoclastic zeal, and declaiming their verse with dramatic flourish in smoke-filled cafés, the Beats gave birth to a literature of previously unimaginable expressive range.

The defining work of Allen Ginsberg and Jack Kerouac provides the foundation for this collection, which also features the improvisational verse of such Beat legends as Gregory Corso, Lawrence Ferlinghetti, Gary Snyder, and Michael McClure and the work of such women writers as Diane DiPrima and Denise Levertov. LeRoi Jones’s plaintive “Preface to a Twenty Volume Suicide Note” and Bob Kaufman’s stirring “Abomunist Manifesto” appear here alongside statements on poetics and the alternately incendiary and earnest correspondence of Beat Generation writers.

Visceral and powerful, infused with an unmediated spiritual and social awareness, this is a rich and varied tribute and, in the populist spirit of the Beats, a vital addition to the libraries of readers everywhere.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:15:19 -0400)

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