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Racing through the dark: the rise and fall…
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Racing through the dark: the rise and fall of David Millar

by David Millar

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Ever since I saw David Millar win the prologue in the Tour I have followed his career. Back then, unlike now, there was little British involvement for us armchair racers to get behind so he was the obvious rider to support for us Brits. I was very disappointed in him when he was exposed as a doper. I knew doping in cycling was bad, the Festina affair had clearly shown that, but it wasn't until I read this book that the depth of doping, the attitude of the teams towards it and the pressure on the riders to constantly produce results or get fired opened my eyes to just how bad it had been.
This book should be read by anyone who follows professional road racing.
Great read. ( )
1 vote GeePee29 | Aug 11, 2012 |
This is an urgent tale, told in an authentic voice. His portraits of contemporaries such as Bradley Wiggins and Mark Cavendish are vividly intimate and shrewdly observed. The recollection of his meeting with Lance Armstrong at the end of the 2007 tour, when he accused the man who had been among his early supporters of abusing the sport, is chilling. And the description of that agonising mountain stage last summer, during which he scoured the depths of his soul while falling helplessly behind the rest of the field, deserves to stand among the great first-person accounts of sporting experience.
 
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To the love of three women. my mother Avril, my sister Frances, and my wife Nicole. Thank you for being so kind.

And the peleton, I treasure the small amount of time I have left with you, even though you can be so cruel.
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Once tipped to be the next English-speaking Tour winner, David Millar's promising career was almost ruined when he succumbed to the temptation of performance-enhancing drugs. Now clean and reflective, David holds nothing back in this account of his dark years.… (more)

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