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Packaging Boyhood: Saving Our Sons from…
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Packaging Boyhood: Saving Our Sons from Superheroes, Slackers, and Other…

by Sharon Lamb Ed.D., Lyn Mikel Brown

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Summary:
Player. Jock. Slacker. Competitor. Superhero. Goofball. Boys are recognized by images in the media that encourage slacking over studying; competition over teamwork; power over empower - ment; and being cool over being yourself. From cartoons to video games, boys are bombarded with stereotypes about what it means to be a boy, including messages about violence, risktaking, and perfecting an image of just not caring. Over 600 boys are surveyed from across the U.S., the authors offer parents and teachers a long, hard look at what boys are watching, reading, hearing, and doing. They give parents and teachers advice on how to talk with young boys about these troubling images and provide them with tools to help them be their unique selves.

Personal Reaction:
I really enjoyed this book. It has a lot of great information and statistics that you can share with young boys to encourage them to be themselves and not fall into the stereotypes that are portrayed in the world.

Classroom Extension Ideas:
1. I would use this book to have an "all about me" day where each student would be able to share the things that they like.
2. I would use this book to teach lessons on stereotypes. ( )
  JeraSullivan | Apr 15, 2012 |
Canvasses clothing, music, sports, entertainment, and other sources of messages that our boys get. Unlike girls, boys get the message that the world is made for them and that they are (or can be) powerful, but the emphasis is rarely on hard work, practice, and the benefits of learning to do something even if you don’t dominate the whole world. Thus, the authors argue, boys are deprived of any recognition of uncertainty; if they’re scared, they aren’t allowed to show it, or any other “soft” emotion—it’s all rage and occasionally tears of joy when the team wins. The only alternative to the hard, always-winning superhero is the slacker, who doesn’t care. This is especially destructive to boys’ ability to succeed in school. Their recommendations involve a lot of talking to your kids; I only wish I was confident that messages from parents would be enough to overcome all these other overwhelming archetypes. ( )
1 vote rivkat | Mar 21, 2011 |
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Sharon Lamb Ed.D.primary authorall editionsconfirmed
Brown, Lyn Mikelmain authorall editionsconfirmed
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Book description
Player. Jock. Slacker. Competitor. Superhero. Goofball. Boys are besieged by images in the media that encourage slacking over studying; competition over teamwork; power over empower - ment; and being cool over being yourself. From cartoons to video games, boys are bombarded with stereotypes about what it means to be a boy, including messages about violence, risktaking, and perfecting an image of just not caring.
Straight from the mouths of over 600 boys surveyed from across the U.S., the authors offer parents a long, hard look at what boys are watch ing, reading, hearing, and doing. They give parents advice on how to talk with their sons about these troubling images and provide them with tools to help their sons resist these mes sages and be their unique selves.
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0312379390, Hardcover)

Player. Jock. Slacker. Competitor. Superhero. Goofball. Boys are besieged by images in the media that encourage slacking over studying; competition over teamwork; power over empower - ment; and being cool over being yourself. From cartoons to video games, boys are bombarded with stereotypes about what it means to be a boy, including messages about violence, risktaking, and perfecting an image of just not caring.
Straight from the mouths of over 600 boys surveyed from across the U.S., the authors offer parents a long, hard look at what boys are watch ing, reading, hearing, and doing. They give parents advice on how to talk with their sons about these troubling images and provide them with tools to help their sons resist these mes sages and be their unique selves.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:50:47 -0400)

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