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Baudolino by Umberto Eco
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Baudolino (original 2000; edition 2002)

by Umberto Eco, William Weaver (Translator)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
5,41364794 (3.51)155
Member:mamzel
Title:Baudolino
Authors:Umberto Eco
Other authors:William Weaver (Translator)
Info:Houghton Mifflin Harcourt (2002), Edition: First Edition, Hardcover, 528 pages
Collections:2012
Rating:***1/2
Tags:Italy, Constantinople, adventure, ad, 12 in 12

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Baudolino by Umberto Eco (2000)

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» See also 155 mentions

English (51)  Spanish (4)  German (2)  Italian (2)  Dutch (2)  French (1)  Hungarian (1)  Portuguese (1)  Swedish (1)  All languages (65)
Showing 1-5 of 51 (next | show all)
Great book. Absolutely hilarious at times, other times really sad, and almost all the time you can't tell if Baudolino is lying or telling the truth lol. ( )
  Benjamin.Timmins | Jan 8, 2014 |
Couldn't get into it. This is my last flirtation with Eco. ( )
  janerawoof | Dec 23, 2013 |
Early on in this book it hit me that I felt like I was reading a collaboration between two of my favorite authors, [a:Tom Robbins|197|Tom Robbins|http://d.gr-assets.com/authors/1351102884p2/197.jpg] and [a:Salman Rushdie|3299|Salman Rushdie|http://d.gr-assets.com/authors/1345771006p2/3299.jpg]. This impression stayed with me until the end though I could definitely hear Eco's own unique voice throughout. I love how Eco took the story of the Holy Grail and turned it completely on it's head, then brought it back almost full circle. Packed with monsters, true love, epic quests and symbolism, anyone interested in medieval tales will enjoy this. ( )
1 vote Cathyvil | Apr 7, 2013 |
Not a bad book, but not his best. maybe it's the translation, but it did not have the bite or pace of The Rose or the Pendulum. ( )
  Breathwork | Apr 7, 2013 |
did not like it - did not finish reading it. ( )
1 vote JanicsEblen | Feb 18, 2013 |
Showing 1-5 of 51 (next | show all)
It's a mystery that begins well, and ends well, too, drenched in the scholastic logic and the intricate, entertaining literary gamesmanship that is Mr. Eco's territory. The problem is that while ''Baudolino'' contains plenty of learning and imagination, it is so strenuously fanciful that it becomes tedious, like a Thanksgiving Day parade that lasts all day.
 

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Umberto Ecoprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Weaver, WilliamTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Amazon.com Amazon.com Review (ISBN 0156029065, Paperback)

The most playful of historical novelists, Umberto Eco has absorbed the real lesson of history: that there is no such thing as the absolute truth. In Baudolino, he hands his narrative to an Italian peasant who has managed, through good luck and a clever tongue, to become the adopted son of the Emperor, Frederick Barbarossa, and a minister of his court in the closing years of the 12th century. Baudolino's other gift is for spontaneous but convincing lies, and so his unfolding tale--as recounted in 1204 to a nobleman of Constantinople, while the fires of the Fourth Crusade rage around them--exemplifies the Cretan Liar's Paradox: He can't be believed. Why not, then, make his story as outrageous as possible? In the course of his picaresque tale, Baudolino manages to touch on nearly every major theme, conflict, and boondoggle of the Middle Ages: the Crusades; the troubadours; the legend of the Holy Grail; the rise of the cathedral cities; the position of Jews; the market in relics; the local rivalries that made Italy so vulnerable to outside attack; and the perennial power struggles between the pope and the emperor. With the help of alcohol and a mysterious Moorish concoction called "green honey," Baudolino and his ragtag friends engage in typical scholastic debates of the period, trying to determine the dimensions of Solomon's Temple and the location of the Earthly Paradise. And when the Emperor needs support in his claims for saintly lineage, who but Baudolino can craft the perfect letter of homage from the legendary Prester John, Holy (and wholly fictitious) Christian King of the East? A giddy and exasperating romp, Baudolino will draw you into its labyrinthine inventions and half-truths, even if you know better. --Regina Marler

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:53:16 -0400)

(see all 4 descriptions)

"It is April, 1204, and Constantinople, the splendid capital of the Byzantine Empire, is being sacked and burned by the knights of the Fourth Crusade. Amid the carnage and confusion, one Baudolino saves a Byzantine historian and high court official from certain death at the hands of the crusading warriors, and proceeds to tell his own fantastical story. Born a simple peasant in northern Italy, Baudolino has two major gifts - a talent for learning foreign languages and skill in telling lies. One day, when still a boy, he met a foreign commander in the woods, charming him with his quick wit and lively mind. The commander - who proves to be the Emperor Frederick Barbarossa - adopts Baudolino and sends him to the university in Paris, where he makes a number of fearless, adventuring friends.""Spurred on by myths and their own reveries, this merry band sets out in search of Prester John, a legendary priest-king who was said to rule over a vast kingdom in the East - a phantasmagorical land of strange creatures with eyes on their shoulders and mouths on their stomachs, of eunuchs, unicorns, and lovely maidens."--BOOK JACKET.… (more)

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