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Confessions by Augustine
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Confessions

by Augustine

Other authors: See the other authors section.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
14,67891135 (3.91)406
  1. 51
    The Six Enneads by Plotinus (jpers36)
    jpers36: Plotinus was a major influence on Augustine.
  2. 22
    Early Christian Lives (Penguin Classics) by Carolinne White (Anonymous user)
  3. 34
    Surprised by Joy: The Shape of My Early Life by C. S. Lewis (2below)
    2below: For anyone interested in exploring spiritual autobiographies, C. S. Lewis' is worth checking out. Unlike Augustine, who covers the entire span of his life from birth to his conversion in adulthood, Lewis focuses on his childhood and young adult years and how his experiences during this time shaped the development of his spiritual life as he got older. I found Lewis' book a much quicker read than Augustine's, though both are very good.… (more)
  4. 02
    Late have I loved thee by Ethel Mannin (lisanicholas)
    lisanicholas: Mannin's novel is modeled on the real-life spiritual autobiography of St Augustine of Hippo. Read the original!
  5. 05
    The Public Hating {short story} by Steve Allen (satanburger)
    satanburger: CONFESSIONS 6.8 (you'll see the similarities)
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» See also 406 mentions

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Showing 1-5 of 81 (next | show all)
One of the great works in philosophy and religion. ( )
  georgee53 | May 29, 2018 |
In Saint Augustine's Confessions, he recounts his journey from being a young atheist living large and looking for answers with his intellect, to his eventual conversion to Christianity through the efforts of his mother, and the peace and security he found in his faith.

I found this book interesting more theoretically than in actuality. Although I'm not a believer, stories about faith (particularly people who came to faith rather than just continuing to believe what they have been taught since they were children) are intriguing...what makes a person decide to believe or renew a belief they had drifted away from? I suspect most of them would describe it the way that Augustine does, as a realization of a truth that they'd been looking for, consciously or unconsciously, throughout their lives. But the environment that produces that realization can vary...sometimes friends and family are involved, sometimes it's an intensely personal experience, sometimes it comes out of the blue, and sometimes right after a major life event that shifted perspective in a significant way.

I didn't realize until I'd already started it that the Kindle copy of the book that I was working with was an abridged edition. I'm not sure if that was a positive or a negative, honestly. While the book never really engaged me until the end, when Augustine gets more analytical about his beliefs, and I was therefore rather happy that there wasn't more of it to get through, perhaps that's because a more developed narrative would have been more compelling all along? I can't honestly say. I didn't personally enjoy reading this particular edition and wouldn't recommend it for a general audience, but for an audience curious and inclined to enjoy books about religion, this would be a worthwhile read. ( )
  500books | May 22, 2018 |
Donated by Mrs Venn
  holycrossabbey | Jan 10, 2018 |
This book has been one of the slowest reads so far this year and took around 41 days to finish. My main struggle was with the language the book was written it. The underlying story was interesting, but there were so many extra words around everything. Especially in the first books, Augustine is constantly referencing back and forward between the past and the present and the relationship between his past actions and God. He regrets choices and actions that he took, but acknowledges that God was present in them and worked through them.
The more I read, the more the underlying story of Augustine's journey became clear. It showed that his was a slow meandering journey to finding God.
His mother, Monnica, is one of the main characters in the book, who is constantly praying to God to save her son. And her prayer is answered before her death, albeit not by many years.
The last chapter ended by tying up the experience with an honest look at how Augustine was living in the present. He struggled with wanting to follow God in his heart, but also wanting to follow his own wills/passions. It is an encouraging insight into the life of such a well-known, influential Christian theologian and philosopher showing that he never attained perfection, but was reassuringly human.
( )
  DeborahJade | Dec 25, 2017 |
A mixed collection of autobiography, spiritual reflection, prayers, allegorical interpretation. Confessions was not at all what I expected it to be — an autobiography through and through. Had I read this with a class or a guide it might have been better, but I wasn't particularly enthralled. ( )
  sc4 | Oct 31, 2017 |
Showing 1-5 of 81 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (122 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Augustineprimary authorall editionscalculated
Barrois, Georges A.Introductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Blumbergs, IlmārsIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Boulding, MariaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Bourke, Vernon J.Introductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Chadwick, HenryTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Dillon, DianeCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Dillon, LeoCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Dolç, MiquelTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Fuller, David OtisEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Gardiner, Harold C.Introductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Gemme, Francis R.Introductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Gibb, JohnEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Hansone, LauraTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Helms, Hal M.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Hudleston, RogerEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Labriolle, Pierre deTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Lelen, J. M.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Matthew, TobieTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Mayes, BernardNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Montgomery, WilliamEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Neer, Joost vansecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
O'Donnell, James J.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
O'Donnell, James J.Commentarysecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
O'Donnell, James J.Introductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Outler, Albert CookTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Pilkington, J. G.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Pine-Coffin, R. S.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Pusey, Edward B.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Rītups, ArnisAfterwordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Rotelle, John E.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Ryan, John KennethTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Shedd, William G. T.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Sheed, F. J.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Vessey, MarkEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Warner, RexTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Watts, WilliamTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Wijdeveld, GerardTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Epigraph
An allegorical interpretation of the first chapter of Genesis (Book XIII)
Dedication
dedicated to parentibus meis
First words
You are great, O Lord, and greatly to be praised: great is your power and to your wisdom there is no limit.
You are great, O Lord, and very worthy of praise; mighty is your power and your wisdom is immeasurable.
'Vast are you, Lord, and vast should be your praise' - 'vast what you do; what you know beyond assaying.'
Great art Thou, O Lord, and greatly to be praised;  great is Thy power, and of Thy wisdom there is no number.   [tr. F. J. Sheed]
Quotations
It became clear to me that things which are subject to corruption must be good, for if they were perfect, or not good at all, they could not be corrupted.
Corruption is an agent of harm but if it is not taking away from what is good, it is causing no harm.
Who remembers the sins of my infancy? ... What were my sins? Did I bawl too loudly for the breast?
As an adolescent I had prayed ... "Give me chastity and give me control over myself, BUT NOT YET".
Last words
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Wikipedia in English (5)

Book description
In his own day the dominant personality of the Western Church, Augustine of Hippo today stands as perhaps the greatest thinker of Christian antiquity, and his Confessions is one of the great works of Western literature. In this intensely personal narrative, Augustine relates his rare ascent from a humble Algerian farm to the edge of the corridors of power at the imperial court in Milan, his struggle against the domination of his sexual nature, his renunciation of secular ambition and marriage, and the recovery of the faith his mother Monica had taught him during his childhood. Now, Henry Chadwick, an eminent scholar of early Christianity, has given us the first new English translation in thirty years of this classic spiritual journey. Chadwick renders the details of Augustine's conversion in clear, modern English. We witness the future saint's fascination with astrology and with the Manichees, and then follow him through scepticism and disillusion with pagan myths until he finally reaches Christian faith. There are brilliant philosophical musings about Platonism and the nature of God, and touching portraits of Augustine's beloved mother, of St. Ambrose of Milan, and of other early Christians like Victorinus, who gave up a distinguished career as a rhetorician to adopt the orthodox faith. Augustine's concerns are often strikingly contemporary, yet his work contains many references and allusions that are easily understood only with background information about the ancient social and intellectual setting. To make The Confessions accessible to contemporary readers, Chadwick provides the most complete and informative notes of any recent translation, and includes an introduction to establish the context. The religious and philosophical value of The Confessions is unquestionable--now modern readers will have easier access to St. Augustine's deeply personal meditations. Chadwick's lucid translation and helpful introduction clear the way for a new experience of this classic.
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 014044114X, Paperback)

‘As a youth … I had prayed to you for chastity and said “Give me chastity and continence, but not yet”’

The son of a pagan father and a Christian mother, Saint Augustine spent his early years torn between conflicting faiths and worldviews. His Confessions, written when he was in his forties, recount how, slowly and painfully, he came to turn away from his youthful ideas and licentious lifestyle, to become instead a staunch advocate of Christianity and one of its most influential thinkers. A remarkably honest and revealing spiritual autobiography, the Confessions also address fundamental issues of Christian doctrine, and many of the prayers and meditations it includes are still an integral part of the practice of Christianity today.

In his introduction R. S. Pine-Coffin discusses Saint Augustine’s intentions in writing his Confessions and issues of translation. This edition also includes a list of dates of events recorded in the Confessions.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:15:20 -0400)

(see all 8 descriptions)

Dedicated to truth and the celebration of his individuality, the eighteenth-century French philosopher reexamines his life, ideals, and experiences.

» see all 32 descriptions

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Penguin Australia

3 editions of this book were published by Penguin Australia.

Editions: 014044114X, 0143039512, 0143105701

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