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The Whole World Over by Julia Glass
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The Whole World Over

by Julia Glass

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I actually enjoyed this more than THREE JUNES. Glass uses a few of the same characters so I would suggest reading these two novels back to back. The author again exhibits a strong talent for character development and analyzing complex social issues. There are always numerous plots unfolding throughout her novels, yet they do not become muddled or confusing. ( )
  Betty.Ann.Beam | Dec 24, 2013 |
The Whole World Over was about twice as long as it should've been, in my opinion. I'd lost my connection with pretty much every character by the middle of the book. There was one subplot I really liked, though, which is why I kept going. ( )
  erelsi183 | Nov 18, 2013 |
Well written character studies, and well crafted story line. ( )
  sberson | Dec 30, 2012 |
This is a meaty novel by the author of the wonderful Three Junes. This one follows four different New Yorkers as they live their lives, reflect on the past, and struggle with life-changing events or decisions. Greenie is a pastry chef who feels restless as she and her husband seemingly grow apart. When the visiting governor of New Mexico tastes her coconut cake, he offers her a job as his chef. Greenie's husband Alan is adrift when she suddenly moves to New Mexico with their young son George, and he must reexamine his life while wondering what remains of his marriage and family. Walter is Greenie's friend and biggest cheerleader who encourages her move out West. Walter's orderly life is upended by a painful breakup and his generous offer to host and mentor his underachieving 19 year-old nephew for a year. Saga is a young woman recovering from a traumatic brain injury living in the care of her elderly uncle but on the periphery of his family. Ms. Glass weaves their stories together beautifully, and I felt really drawn to all of the characters. Best of all was the reappearance of Fenno McLoud, a favorite character from Three Junes. I would love to spend some more time with these people.
3 vote AMQS | Dec 1, 2011 |
This is the 9/11 one. NYC chef moves to Arizona to cook for conservative governor; husband and child stay is NYC. Well drawn characters deal with distance and loss, with 9/11 as a plot catalyst. ( )
  suedutton | Oct 9, 2011 |
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0375422749, Hardcover)

From the author of the beloved novel Three Junes comes a rich and commanding story about the accidents, both grand and small, that determine our choices in love and marriage. Greenie Duquette, openhearted yet stubborn, devotes most of her passionate attention to her Greenwich Village bakery and her four–year–old son, George. Her husband, Alan, seems to have fallen into a midlife depression, while Walter, a traditional gay man who has become her closest professional ally, is nursing a broken heart.

It is at Walter’s restaurant that the visiting governor of New Mexico tastes Greenie’s coconut cake and decides to woo her away from the city to be his chef. For reasons both ambitious and desperate, she accepts—and finds herself heading west without her husband. This impulsive decision will change the course of several lives within and beyond Greenie’s orbit. Alan, alone in New York, must face down his demons; Walter, eager for platonic distraction, takes in his teenage nephew. Yet Walter cannot steer clear of love trouble, and despite his enforced solitude, Alan is still surrounded by women: his powerful sister, an old flame, and an animal lover named Saga, who grapples with demons all her own. As for Greenie, living in the shadow of a charismatic politician leads to a series of unforeseen consequences that separate her from her only child. We watch as folly, chance, and determination pull all these lives together and apart over a year that culminates in the fall of the twin towers at the World Trade Center, an event that will affirm or confound the choices each character has made—or has refused to face.

Julia Glass is at her best here, weaving a glorious tapestry of lives and lifetimes, of places and people, revealing the subtle mechanisms behind our most important, and often most fragile, connections to others. In The Whole World Over she has given us another tale that pays tribute to the extraordinary complexities of love.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:30:07 -0400)

(see all 3 descriptions)

GENERAL & LITERARY FICTION. A rich and commanding story about the accidents, both grand and small, that determine our choices in love and marriage. Greenie Duquette, openhearted yet stubborn, devotes most of her passionate attention to her Greenwich Village bakery and her four- year- old son, George. Her husband, Alan, seems to have fallen into a midlife depression, while Walter, a traditional gay man who has become her closest professional ally, is nursing a broken heart. We watch as folly, chance, and determination pull all these lives together and apart over a year that culminates in the fall of the twin towers at the World Trade Center, an event that will affirm or confound the choices each character has made- or has refused to face. Julia Glass is at her besthere, weaving a glorious tapestry of lives and lifetimes, of places and people, revealing the subtle mechanisms behind our most important, and often most fragile, connections to others.… (more)

» see all 5 descriptions

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