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Big Girl

by Danielle Steel

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7071723,107 (3.3)6
Landing her dream job as a high school teacher, Victoria Dawson loves working with her students and wages war on her weight at the gym. Despite tension with her parents, Victoria remains close to her sister, Gracie, and when Grace announces her engagement to a man who is an exact replica of their narcissistic father, a chance encounter, an act of stunning betrayal, and a family confrontation lead to a turning point in Victoria's life.… (more)
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» See also 6 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 17 (next | show all)
I listened to this book on Audio CD. I liked the main character however I found the reality of the situations in the book to be very Danielle Steel. The girl is 15 pounds overweight in High School (GASP!) and 25 pounds overweight as an adult (DOUBLE GASP!). Her being "extremely overweight" has caused all sorts of pain in her life. I just found it to be somewhat of a smack in the face to any person that has been overweight that such a small amount of weight would ruin this poor girls life. It was pretty much what I expected from a Danielle Steel novel though. I hadn't read one since middle school and this is why. ( )
  lacey.tucker | Mar 10, 2016 |
Victoria Dawson can't help but feel out of place in her family, especially living in a city as glamorous and body-conscious as Los Angeles. Her father, Jim, is tall and slender, and Victoria's mother, Christina, is a fine-boned, dark-haired beauty. By comparison, Victoria was a chubby little girl with blonde hair, blue eyes, and rather ordinary looks. Needless to say, both her parents were intensely critical, outspoken, and noticeably disappointed by their daughter's ordinary appearance.

When Victoria was six years old, she saw a picture of Queen Victoria, and her father told her that she looked just like her. After the birth of Victoria's perfect little sister Grace, her father liked to refer to his firstborn as "our little tester cake". With the birth of Gracie, everyone agreed that Jim and Christina definitely did something right.

As hard as she tries, Victoria just can't seem to win the battle against her weight: as a young adult, she is still overly plump, and has an awful sweet tooth. While her parents and sister can eat anything they want and not gain an ounce, Victoria must watch everything she eats. She quietly endures her father's belittling comments about her body and watches her various academic achievements go unacknowledged by her family. Ice cream and oversized helpings of all the wrong foods may give Victoria some comfort, but only for a few moments.

The only thing Victoria knows is that she must get away from home, and so, after going to college in Chicago, she moves to New York City. Landing her dream job as a high school teacher, Victoria feels like she has finally found her niche: she absolutely loves working with her students and continues to wage a determined war on her weight at the gym. When Grace announces her engagement to a man who is an exact replica of their father, Victoria worries about her sister's future happiness. However, with no man of her own, Victoria can't help but feel like she is a failure once again.

Returning home to attend Grace's wedding, Victoria finds that not much has changed in her absence. Despite the continued tension with her parents, Victoria and Grace have always been close; and although the sisters could not look more different, they love each other unconditionally. Yet regardless of Victoria's many accomplishments, her parents attitudes toward her still haven't changed: they know just what to say to bring her down. She will always be her father's "big girl," and her mother's constant disapproval is equally as unkind.

Victoria has spent a lifetime trying to forget the numerous little occasions of thoughtlessness and cruelty - the various incidents of hurt and neglect perpetrated on her by her parents. But she has finally reached the point of no return; the point where even ice cream can no longer dull the pain. As the wedding draws near, a chance encounter, a deeply upsetting betrayal, and a family confrontation all lead to an unavoidable turning point for Victoria. She faces a tough challenge as she goes ahead in her life, as well as a difficult personal risk: to accept herself as she is, celebrate it, and eventually to claim the victories she has fought so hard for and deserves.

To be perfectly honest, this story was a little bit of a let down for me. I found it to be slightly repetitive and somewhat disappointing, although it was still a fairly enjoyable story - certainly Danielle Steel's typical writing style. This was fast-paced and easy reading for me, but overall it wasn't her most riveting storyline. I had to give this book a B+! ( )
  moonshineandrosefire | Dec 12, 2015 |
Victoria (named after the Queen for not so flattering reasons) is described as the “tester cake” baby before the perfection of her younger sister came along. Victoria is the outcast in her family because she does not fit the cookie cutter image of her family's L.A. perfection. Moving to New York to take a teaching position, Victoria finds a group of equally unconventional friends and a life of her own. However, one cannot avoid family forever, and as her sister's wedding draws closer Victoria once again has to face her personal demons. A nice light summer read. ( )
  ChristineEllei | Jul 14, 2015 |
the first 150 pages were good, but after that I got bored and did not continue reading, the problem is the appearance of a homosexual character, not likely of Steel. I don't accept homosexuality at all, so I did not continue reading.
I like her novel 'Daddy' more, even 'Coming out' is good too
( )
  nohahamed | Mar 9, 2014 |
My audio debut, and what easier way to start with a good old Danielle Steel.
The story apppealed to me, more than anything as I have had weight issues all my life, and I sort of bonded with Victoria and really wanted to know the ending soooh soon.
It was OK, as DS goes, as I'm no fan, but the prose was a bit too syrupy for me. ( )
  gogglemiss | Oct 28, 2013 |
Showing 1-5 of 17 (next | show all)
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Landing her dream job as a high school teacher, Victoria Dawson loves working with her students and wages war on her weight at the gym. Despite tension with her parents, Victoria remains close to her sister, Gracie, and when Grace announces her engagement to a man who is an exact replica of their narcissistic father, a chance encounter, an act of stunning betrayal, and a family confrontation lead to a turning point in Victoria's life.

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