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Queen Victoria: Demon Hunter by A. E. Moorat
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Queen Victoria: Demon Hunter (2009)

by A. E. Moorat

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Showing 1-5 of 23 (next | show all)
I don’t even know how long I’ve been wanting to read this book. All I know is that it’s been years and I can’t believe I have finally read it. After reading Pride and Prejudice and Zombies when it came out, and loving it. Then reading Romeo & Juliet & Vampires a couple years ago and not liking it, I wasn’t sure how I would feel about this one. I was hoping I would enjoy it, but I wasn’t going into with the expectations I had for it when I first found out about it and added it to my wish list.

It was so good. I didn’t want to put it down. I lost track of time while reading it and stayed up until 2 AM. I can’t even remember the last time that happened. It was so funny and had great action. There were so many times I was laughing out loud. There were times when I just had to go read bits of it to my dad. I couldn’t wait to see how it would end, but at the same time, I didn’t want it to end.

I thoroughly enjoyed this book and I can’t wait to read more by this author. I’ve had Henry VIII, Wolfman on my wish list for years as well. I might need to pick that one up soon.

If you want a fast, funny read, with strong female characters and you enjoyed books like Pride and Prejudice and Zombies, you should check this one out.

https://thebookhoarderblog.wordpress.com/2016/03/11/review-queen-victoria-demon-hunter-by-a-e-moorat/ ( )
  TheBookHoarder | Mar 14, 2016 |
Pretty good, a pleasant diversion, but not meaty enough for a bona fide classic. ( )
  rnmackrn26 | Aug 21, 2014 |
This story follows Victoria as she becomes Queen of England, and realises there is more to life than she'd thought. On the night her uncle dies and the throne becomes hers Victoria meets her first demon, and Maggie Brown one of the team of Protektors charged with keeping her safe from them. There is far more that she will have to learn than she'd ever imagined, and all whilst she pursues Albert of Saxe-Coburg and Gothe. At the same time in London Lord Quimby holds a party that ends up with a bloodbath and his loyal manservant Perkins being turned into a zombie. Whilst trying to foil a blackmail attempt they start to formulate a plot that will allow them to use their new zombie making skills.

I was fairly dubious before I started reading the book - I'd avoided all of the monster twists on classics but as this was original fiction based on facts I thought it might be okay. I'm no historian so I wasn't too worried about glaring historical inaccuracies - it's worth a mention that there are deliberate anachronisms that may bother readers with an interest in history.

It's really hard to try and describe this book and I think one of the main reasons for this is that there are two main plotlines working throughout the book. Whilst they're both just about working toward the same end point they don't feel very connected. Victoria's plotline does at times feel very thin. I liked the idea of a secret demon hunting team within the royal household and Victoria's involvement with them. I frequently found myself wishing that the author had carried on with her story rather than jumping back to the other main plot. The plot for Quimby and Perkins on the other hand was stronger, it did add a little more graphic detail at times for my tastes but I'm sure many readers will love this. The dark humour that accompanied their story worked really well, I found myself really enjoying it.

I enjoyed some but not all of the characters, there were a number of characters that felt a little panto-like. I would have loved to see more of Victoria and Albert, and the Brown family. The bizarre Jeeves and Wooster style pairing of Quimby and Perkins were wonderful.

I did, in general, enjoy this book though I think I would have enjoyed it far more if the two plotlines had been expanded and given their own books. I suspect that if this had happened the Victoria book would have been the book I had expected to pick up and the Quimby and Perkins book would have been a thoroughly enjoyable bonus. ( )
  juniperjungle | Apr 16, 2013 |
This story follows Victoria as she becomes Queen of England, and realises there is more to life than she'd thought. On the night her uncle dies and the throne becomes hers Victoria meets her first demon, and Maggie Brown one of the team of Protektors charged with keeping her safe from them. There is far more that she will have to learn than she'd ever imagined, and all whilst she pursues Albert of Saxe-Coburg and Gothe. At the same time in London Lord Quimby holds a party that ends up with a bloodbath and his loyal manservant Perkins being turned into a zombie. Whilst trying to foil a blackmail attempt they start to formulate a plot that will allow them to use their new zombie making skills.

I was fairly dubious before I started reading the book - I'd avoided all of the monster twists on classics but as this was original fiction based on facts I thought it might be okay. I'm no historian so I wasn't too worried about glaring historical inaccuracies - it's worth a mention that there are deliberate anachronisms that may bother readers with an interest in history.

It's really hard to try and describe this book and I think one of the main reasons for this is that there are two main plotlines working throughout the book. Whilst they're both just about working toward the same end point they don't feel very connected. Victoria's plotline does at times feel very thin. I liked the idea of a secret demon hunting team within the royal household and Victoria's involvement with them. I frequently found myself wishing that the author had carried on with her story rather than jumping back to the other main plot. The plot for Quimby and Perkins on the other hand was stronger, it did add a little more graphic detail at times for my tastes but I'm sure many readers will love this. The dark humour that accompanied their story worked really well, I found myself really enjoying it.

I enjoyed some but not all of the characters, there were a number of characters that felt a little panto-like. I would have loved to see more of Victoria and Albert, and the Brown family. The bizarre Jeeves and Wooster style pairing of Quimby and Perkins were wonderful.

I did, in general, enjoy this book though I think I would have enjoyed it far more if the two plotlines had been expanded and given their own books. I suspect that if this had happened the Victoria book would have been the book I had expected to pick up and the Quimby and Perkins book would have been a thoroughly enjoyable bonus. ( )
  juniperjungle | Apr 16, 2013 |
Ever since Pride, Prejudice and Zombies was released a couple of years ago, many books in the [standard work] + [horror element] formula were released. We have Sense, Sensibility and Sea-monsters, Android Karenina, Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter and many more. I have enjoyed every book in this genre, they are just good fun to read. So when I found Queen Victoria: Demon Hunter with this great cover for a couple of euros I just couldn't resist.
This book tells the story of Queen Victoria, from just before her becoming queen, to just after the birth of her second child. It stays true to most facts of her life, such as the strained relationship between her and her mother on account of her mother's comptroller, Sir John Conroy. Other real people who appear are of course Prince Albert, Lord Melbourne, King Leopold, Baroness Lehzen and Lady Hastings. However, everything is seen in a whole new light with the addition of demons walking the earth, and the descendants of Baal trying to gain power to rule the world.
A. E. Moorat does a really good job weaving in the demons with history. An example is the scandal of Lady Flora Hastings, who was allegedly pregnant with Sir John Conroy's baby. In reality it turned out to be liver cancer, in the book... something else. Queen Victoria kicks ass and is everything as powerful, ethical and royal as I expected (and wanted) her to be. All in all a very fun read, very well done. Four out of five stars. ( )
1 vote divinenanny | Jan 22, 2012 |
Showing 1-5 of 23 (next | show all)
Moorat, the pseudonym of British novelist Andrew Holmes, has just the right touch for such silly stuff. And if this book whets your appetite for more occult revisionist English history, you'll be pleased to know that the author, his publisher reports, is working on another novel: "Henry VIII: Wolfman."
 
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Much later, as he watched his manservant, Perkins, eating the dog, Quimby gloomily reflected on the unusual events of the evening.
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(from the back of the book) London, 1838, Queen Vistoria is crowned; she receives the orb, the scepter, and an arsenal of bloodstained waeponry. If Brittain is about to become the greatest power of the age, there's the small matter of the undead to take care of first. Demons stalk the crown, and political ambitions have unleashed ravening hordes of zombies even within the nobility itself. But rather than dreams of demon hunting, Queen Victoria's thoughts are occupied by Prince Albert. Can she dedicate her life to saving her country when her heart belongs elsewhere? With lashings of glistening entrails, decapitations, zombies, and foul demons, this masterly new portrait will give a fresh understanding of a remarkable woman, a legendary monarch, and quite possiblly the best demon hunter the world has ever seen.
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London, 1838. Queen Victoria is crowned; she receives the orb, the scepter, and an arsenal of bloodstained weaponry. If Britain is about to become the greatest power of the age, there's the small matter of the undead to take care of first--and to her surprise, the queen is the one person who can hunt them down. Can she dedicate her life to saving her country when her heart belongs to Prince Albert?… (more)

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