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Rich Dad's Guide to Investing: What the Rich…
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Rich Dad's Guide to Investing: What the Rich Invest in, That the Poor and… (2000)

by Robert T. Kiyosaki

Other authors: Sharon L. Lechter (Author)

Series: Rich Dad

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825416,691 (3.55)2

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Showing 4 of 4
A very controversial book. I believe Rich Dad is fictional. Some interesting information in it nonetheless. To become rich, one has to run a business: working a 9-5 job and a good education will not get your rich. ( )
  rcalbright | Sep 6, 2017 |
4 stars ( )
  JennysBookBag.com | Sep 28, 2016 |
I picked this up to listen to on the bus. I sometimes got annoyed with the gimmick of referring to his "rich dad". He does a lot of promoting of his other books and products.

To sum it up - start a business, invest using the business.

I did find his point of your home not being an asset. It has value which you could get when you sell, but until if in when you sell it is costing you money and bringing nothing in.

I wonder how his "poor dad" feels about being held up as what not to do? It seems like he considers his "poor dad" a failure. ( )
  nx74defiant | Sep 24, 2016 |
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Robert T. Kiyosakiprimary authorall editionscalculated
Lechter, Sharon L.Authorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
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Amazon.com Amazon.com Review (ISBN 0446677469, Paperback)

The rich are different from the rest of us, if for no other reason than U.S. tax and securities laws allow them to invest in ways that keep us from catching up to them. That's why 90 percent of all corporate shares of stock are owned by 10 percent of the people. Kiyosaki believes it's possible for anyone to move up into that 10 percent, but it takes a different view of investing than most people have: it takes a plan to be a successful investor. And a plan is more than simply buying and selling, or collecting "assets" that bring in no cash and are thus more akin to liabilities. The way most people invest, "they might as well be pushing a wheelbarrow in a circle," he writes. A plan is "mechanical, automatic, and boring," a formula for success that has worked historically for most of those who've used it. Kiyosaki's "rich dad" (actually, the father of his best friend) tells him the simplest analogy is the game Monopoly: buy four green houses, trade them for one red hotel, and repeat until you become rich.

The overall message of Rich Dad's Guide to Investing is that this is an abundant world, full of opportunity for the sophisticated investor. However, it sometimes takes a while to find this point. Much of the book is told in dialogues between young Kiyosaki and his rich dad, and these conversations can ramble. There are rewards for the careful reader--for example, in the middle of a section on the basic rules of investing, Kiyosaki's rich dad compares investor education to toilet training: difficult at first but eventually automatic. But getting to these inspired metaphors means wading through a lot of repetitive dialogue. It's a bit ironic that someone who advocates investor discipline should show so little as a writer. But by the end of the book, even the rambling starts to make sense. By the hundredth time you read that the rich don't work for money, and that you don't need money to make money, both concepts start to make sense. It still looks difficult to apply these ideas, but Rich Dad's Guide to Investing certainly makes the case that they'll work for anyone bold and smart enough to practice them. --Lou Schuler

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:25:30 -0400)

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Describes how the wealthiest percentage of the population handles investments, and suggests ways to follow the example, including building one's own business in order to invest as a business, not an individual.

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