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Frindle by Andrew Clements
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Frindle (original 1996; edition 1998)

by Andrew Clements, Brian Selznick (Illustrator)

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4,6071661,036 (4.02)29
Member:ColorBound
Title:Frindle
Authors:Andrew Clements
Other authors:Brian Selznick (Illustrator)
Info:Atheneum Books for Young Readers (1998), Paperback, 112 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:***
Tags:Realistic Novel

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Frindle by Andrew Clements (1996)

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Showing 1-5 of 165 (next | show all)
Nicholas Allen is a fifth-grader with a very creative mind and a knack for causing trouble. Many of his teachers do not see through his procrastination in class, but Ms. Granger does. She assigns Nick more homework instead of answering his question in class. Nick does a report on the dictionary and learns that people create the words in the dictionary. Nick begins using the word “frindle” in place of the word “pen” and gets his friends to follow along. Soon the new word spreads like wildfire, and kids all across the country are using this new word.
I remember reading this story in middle school, and I always loved it. I think Nick is a very smart kid, and he comes up with ideas I would have never thought about. I think it is very interesting to read about a new word coming to life because as Nick says in the story, someone made up all the words in the dictionary. The writing style makes this book appropriate for elementary school students, and I think it’s a very fun book to share with students. ( )
  mkstorey | Feb 1, 2017 |
I really like this story and have enjoyed it since I read it in the fourth grade. This is a story that shows the power of one creative mind. The big idea is to encourage children to think outside of the box and to never give up. A fifth grade boy named Nick calls a pen “frindle” because he likes that word better. Despite teachers telling him to stop using the word, he spreads the term throughout the school and gains popularity. I believe this book has a great message, but do not like how it emphasizes the success of a student who did not listen to his teachers. However, it encourages an open mind and challenging popular beliefs to be unique, which is inspiring. The book helps children think about ethical questions and challenges them to think about other perspectives. For example, a teacher can ask students, “Do you think Nick should have been in trouble for creating the word frindle even though it became a word in the dictionary many years later?” . The main character is relatable because he is spontaneous, creative, silly, and the same age as most readers. There are not many illustrations since it is a chapter book for older children. The amount of text on each page is appropriate for a 4th-5th grade age level because the print is fairly large and not too overwhelming. The book is 105 pages, so it is good for elementary school students who have moved past a beginner’s chapter book,but are not ready for young adult novels. ( )
  NicoleFrankel | Dec 14, 2016 |
A smart boy named Nicholas Allen was always trying to get out of homework assignments by asking questions at the end of class that would distract the teacher from assigning homework. He tried to do this to his fifth grade teacher, Mrs. Granger on the first day in her class. She told him to find out for himself and present the information to the class the following day. Mrs. Granger told Nick that "we decide what goes into [the dictionary]" so Nick had a good idea. He wanted to create a new word: "frindle". He started to call pens "frindles". The kids at his elementary school liked the word and started using it. Mrs. Granger was angry, but Nick's parents were proud of him. Eventually, the word became popular around the world and was put into the dictionary. Nick got 30% of the profit for everything sold that said "frindle" on it and he was rich by the time he was 21 years old. At the end of the book, Nick got a letter from Mrs. Granger. After reading the letter, he found out that she supported his idea all along.

I liked the book because I think that if I read it to students, they would look at words in a different way. They would know that they are not too young to invent new things.

I would tell students what monopoly means on p. 6. I would ask students if they have ever had a tough teacher like Mrs. Granger after reading p. 12. I would ask students to predict what Nick's report is going to be about after reading p. 22. After reading the sentence on p. 32, "She was unstoppable...atleast for today" I would as students what they think that Nick may do next to side track Mrs. Granger. After reading p. 38 I would as students why Nick and his friends started calling a pen a "frindle". After reading p. 48, I would ask students why the new word was such a disruption? After reading p. 56 I would ask students why Nick compared the frindle situation to a game of chess. After reading p. 69, I would have students predict how the reporter got the class picture. After reading p. 803, I would tell students that Nick's dad did not seem excited about the check for $2,250 and I would ask students why not. After reading p. 89, I would ask students why Nick started keeping his good ideas to himself. After reading the book, I would ask the students if anything surprised them about the ending.

I would have students compare and contrast Nick and Mrs. Granger by drawing on specific details in the text. Next, I would ask students if they thought that Nick or Mrs. Granger responded to the problem appropriately. Students would need to pick either Nick or Mrs. Granger and support their thoughts with evidence from the book. This response would be in essay form with an introduction, reasons for their opinion that are supported by evidence from the book, and a conclusion. ( )
  sarahthigpen | Dec 6, 2016 |
I loved this book when I read it in school, and I still love it when I read it this year! It does a great job with writing about words and learning and especially using a fifth grader who can inspire kids around this age to love school and words. It is very creative. It shows students to believe in themselves because Nick never gave up even when his teacher tried to fight it. ( )
  Oliviacap | Nov 21, 2016 |
Summary: Frindle is a book about a fifth grade boy named Nick Allen. Nick is a trouble maker and ends up getting in trouble, and because of his teacher's obsession with the dictionary, his punishment is to write a report on the dictionary. In the process of doing the report he actually starts to become more interested in the dictionary. He decides he is gonna invent his own new word and so he invents "frindle". It's just another word for pen. Everyone started using it as soon as he invented it. While all of the students loved it, the teachers' tried to stop him from using it. Eventually it becomes an actual word in the dictionary.

Personal Reaction: I actually read this book once before back in third grade, so I really enjoyed re-reading it. It is a cute book, that also has a powerful message. Don't let other people's negativity take away the fun and the things you believe in. The author did a beautiful job of bringing the characters of the book to life. I will definitely be reading this book to one of my classes.

Classroom Extension:
1. Let the children invent their own dictionary of words for our classroom.
2. Do a book report over the book, asking the kids to highlight their favorite part of the book.
  Shelby_Booker1214 | Oct 27, 2016 |
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» Add other authors (5 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Andrew Clementsprimary authorall editionscalculated
Selznick, BrianIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Epigraph
Dedication
For Becky, Charles, George, Nate, and John - A.C.
First words
If you asked the kids and the teachers at Lincoln Elementary School to make three lists- all the really bad kids, all the really smart kids, and all the really good kids- Nick Allen would not be on any of them. Nick deserved a list of his own, and everyone knew it.
Quotations
So many things have gone out of date. But after all these years, words are still important. Words are still needed by everyone. Words are still used to think with, write with, to dream with, to hope and pray with. And that is why I love the dictionary. It endures. It works. And as you know, it also changes and grows.
"This is not an easy visit for me. We are having some trouble at school, and it appears Nick is in the middle of it."
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Book description
Is Nick Allen a troublemaker?
He really just likes to liven things up at school—and he’s always had plenty of great ideas. When Nick learns some interesting information about how words are created, suddenly he’s got the inspiration for his best plan ever ... the frindle. Who says a pen has to be called a pen? Why not call it a frindle? Things begin innocently enough as Nick gets his friends to use the new word. Then other people in town start saying frindle. Soon the school is in an uproar, and Nick has become a local hero. His teacher wants Nick to put an end to all this nonsense, but the funny thing is frindle doesn’t belong to Nick anymore. The new word is spreading across the country, and there’s nothing Nick can do to stop it.

—from back cover
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0689818769, Paperback)

Is Nick Allen a troublemaker?

He really just likes to liven things up at school -- and he's always had plenty of great ideas. When Nick learns some interesting information about how words are created, suddenly he's got the inspiration for his best plan ever...the frindle. Who says a pen has to be called a pen? Why not call it a frindle? Things begin innocently enough as Nick gets his friends to use the new word. Then other people in town start saying frindle. Soon the school is in an uproar, and Nick has become a local hero. His teacher wants Nick to put an end to all this nonsense, but the funny thing is frindle doesn't belong to Nick anymore. The new word is spreading across the country, and there's nothing Nick can do to stop it.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 17:59:16 -0400)

(see all 4 descriptions)

When he decides to turn his fifth grade teacher's love of the dictionary around on her, clever Nick Allen invents a new word and begins a chain of events that quickly moves beyond his control.

(summary from another edition)

» see all 4 descriptions

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