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Bouvard and Pécuchet by Gustave Flaubert
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Bouvard and Pécuchet (1881)

by Gustave Flaubert

Other authors: See the other authors section.

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1,340168,884 (3.83)34
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» See also 34 mentions

English (10)  French (3)  Dutch (1)  Italian (1)  Spanish (1)  All languages (16)
Showing 1-5 of 10 (next | show all)
Bouvard and Pécuchet by Gustave Flaubert
4 stars
Bouvard and Pécuchet meet by chance and from that day forward, they are inseparable. When Bouvard inherits from his uncle, the two go south, buying a farm. To occupy themselves, they take up studies in many subjects, usually giving up the second they are stymied. This was delightful to read, although very repetitive. The characters were so funny, fancying themselves scholars and experts after reading a few books on a topic. This was Flaubert's last, left unfinished, though the ending it has works as one. It is said to be his criticism of the arts and sciences, but I saw criticism of those people who study too much and forget to experience their subject.
While reading this, I listened to classical music from the Romantic period (DeBussy, Saint-Saens, and Berlioz, to name a few). The music was light and picaresque, much like the novel. ( )
  tstan | Sep 4, 2016 |
Well I related to Bouvard and Pecuchet because I also read for knowledge. I hope my application of what i learn comes across a little better than theirs. This book was referenced in AJ Jacobs book "The know it all" which was a really fun read. I did the audiobook and forgot to write down the name of Bouvard and Pecuchet and I emailed AJ. Either he isnt as megafamous as i thought or he is truly a nice guy because he emailed me back with the name of the book.

Some part of this book i couldnt tell if it was hard to follow because it was translated or if it was just the way it was written. ( )
  JWarrenBenton | Jan 4, 2016 |
Well I related to Bouvard and Pecuchet because I also read for knowledge. I hope my application of what i learn comes across a little better than theirs. This book was referenced in AJ Jacobs book "The know it all" which was a really fun read. I did the audiobook and forgot to write down the name of Bouvard and Pecuchet and I emailed AJ. Either he isnt as megafamous as i thought or he is truly a nice guy because he emailed me back with the name of the book.

Some part of this book i couldnt tell if it was hard to follow because it was translated or if it was just the way it was written. ( )
  JWarrenBenton | Jan 4, 2016 |
This unfinished work by Flaubert was both enjoyable and a slog to read. I liked the whole idea but it just kind of wears on and on. Two men become friends and one receives and inheritance, they both retire and move to the country where they try various things to find something to fill their days, end at never doing anything well, losing most of everything they had, including friends, contemplate suicide and the book ends with Christmas Eve. What a perfect timing to read this book. For that reason I appreciate it. ( )
1 vote Kristelh | Dec 23, 2015 |
I found this more amusing in concept than in execution. Flaubert's satire just didn't strike a chord with me, although I found some sections highly entertaining. I think that for me, the main problem was that Bouvard and Pécuchet were just foils for the author to voice his opinions about the different subjects and so never became sympathetic - their ineptitude eventually grew to be irritating.

I did particularly like the section about educating Victor and Victorine, which I almost missed due to my ebook missing the last two chapters. So a word of warning to those who are reading an ebook edition - make sure that you have TEN chapters! Most of the public domain ebooks only have the first 8 chapters! ( )
1 vote leslie.98 | Mar 28, 2014 |
Showing 1-5 of 10 (next | show all)
A typical chapter begins with Bouvard writing his banker to send books on his latest obsession, which he and Pécuchet utterly misunderstand. (“The problem with reading,” warns Blanchot, “is the reader.” He probably had this book in mind.) They set about putting their wrongheaded expertise to use, attracting acolytes from a nearby village of colorfully stupid rustics, whose enthusiasm curdles into rage when Bouvard and Pécuchet plunge them all into scandal. Depressed, the heroes mope, but they quickly recover and, bursting with enthusiasm, announce a new obsession and send for more supplies. Like us, when inspired, they go shopping.
 

» Add other authors (50 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Flaubert, Gustaveprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Borger, EduTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Gothot-Mersch, ClaudineEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Otthoffer, MichelCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Sbarbaro, CamilloTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Silvi, Juan CarlosTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Suffel, JacquesEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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With the temperature up in the nineties, the Boulevard Bourdon was absolutely deserted.
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Book description
Bouvard and Pecuchet are two Chaplinesque copy-clerks who meet on a park bench in Paris. Following an unexpected inheritence, they decide to give up their jobs and explore the world of ideas.
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"Considered Gustave Flaubert's masterpiece, Bouvard and Pecuchet opens with two middle-aged copy-clerks who become fast friends after meeting on a city bench and discovering their shared habit of writing their names in their hats: "I should say so! Someone could walk off with mine at the office!" When a small inheritance allows Bouvard and Pecuchet to retire early and move to the country, they use their newfound leisure time to satisfy their curiosity about all the things they'd been too busy to study in the city. Flaubert shows his unlikely protagonists diving disastrously into everything from farming and politics to literature and love, and coming up empty-handed each time - until, finally, their obsessive pursuit of knowledge becomes an end in itself." Bouvard and Pecuchet unravels the novel's realist tradition, and sets the stage for the modernist innovations of Kafka, Joyce, and Beckett. Although Flaubert died before completing it, this new translation contains the fullest and most accurate version of the text, as well as his "Dictionary of Accepted Ideas" and the previously untranslated "Catalogue of Fashionable Ideas."--Publisher.… (more)

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