HomeGroupsTalkMoreZeitgeist
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

Man's Search for Meaning (1946)

by Viktor E. Frankl

Other authors: See the other authors section.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
11,057215426 (4.25)189
In this work, a Viennese psychiatrist tells his grim experiences in a German concentration camp which led him to logotherapy, an existential method of psychiatry. This work has riveted generations of readers with its descriptions of life in Nazi death camps and its lessons for spiritual survival. Between 1942 and 1945 the author, a psychiatrist labored in four different camps, including Auschwitz, while his parents, brother, and pregnant wife perished. Based on his own experience and the stories of his many patients, he argues that we cannot avoid suffering but we can choose how to cope with it, find meaning in it, and move forward with renewed purpose. His theory, known as logotherapy, from the Greek word logos (meaning), holds that our primary drive in life is not pleasure, as Freud maintained, but the discovery and pursuit of what we personally find meaningful.… (more)
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 189 mentions

English (201)  Spanish (8)  Dutch (2)  German (1)  French (1)  Italian (1)  All languages (214)
Showing 1-5 of 201 (next | show all)
This is my first time ever reading a book about the Holocaust and I'm interested in reading more like these.

The first half of the book is the author's experience in different camps and the thoughts that he had when he was there. I was mildly disturbed by the deaths and torture that he and his friends were put through but it wasn't too bad that I would stop reading it.

The other half of the book is the author himself mainly talking about logotheraphy and methods he used to help his patients suffering from different neuroses they had. He also includes his take on the meaning of life and I think those essays in particular are very interesting and just for those I would read the book for sure.

This is a book that I think everyone should read at least once as I believe that it has many different advices surrounding the topic of 'Life' and they can be implemented in ours one way or another. ( )
  nikkiyrj | Sep 18, 2020 |
A book to be read and reread, rich in content and provocative insight. Also an obvious inspiration for so many contemporary authors, including Andrew Solomon (Far from the Tree) and John Kay (Obliquity). ( )
  GeorgeHunter | Sep 13, 2020 |
See FBI Director Comey in WashPost, 4/17/15. Why I require FBI agents to visit the Holocaust Museum. http://tinyurl.com/owfw36u ( )
  tmph | Sep 13, 2020 |
I received Viktor Frankl’s book, Man's Search for Meaning as a Christmas gift. I cannot think of a better book to start the new year off. Even though I read this book in January, it is now March as I write this review. The globe is being held hostage by the COVID-19 virus. I underlined a phrase in the book that is helping me put things in perspective.
Forces beyond your control can take away everything you possess except one thing, your freedom to choose how you will respond to the situation. ~ Howard Kushner, Foreward to Man's Search for Meaning Read more ( )
  skrabut | Sep 2, 2020 |
A compelling Holocaust read filled with spot on reflection and not just a story. ( )
  JayLivernois | Aug 22, 2020 |
Showing 1-5 of 201 (next | show all)

» Add other authors (59 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Frankl, Viktor E.Authorprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Kushner, Harold S.Forewordmain authorsome editionsconfirmed
Lasch, IlseTranslatormain authorsome editionsconfirmed
Winslade, William J.Afterwordmain authorsome editionsconfirmed
Allport, Gordon WPrefacesecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Šuvajevs, IgorsTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
To the memory of my mother
First words
This book does not claim to be an account of facts and events but of personal experiences, experiences which millions of prisoners have suffered time and again.
Quotations
He who has a Why to live for can bear almost any How
Life is not primarily a quest for pleasure, as Freud believed, or a quest for power, as Alfred Adler taught, but a quest for meaning.
Man's inner strangth may raise him about his outward fate
Forces beyond your control can take away everything you possess except one thing, your freedom to choose how you will respond to the situation. You cannot control what happens to you in life, but you can always control what you feel and do about what happens to you.
Life is meaningful and that we must learn to see life as meaningful despite our circumstances.
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (2)

In this work, a Viennese psychiatrist tells his grim experiences in a German concentration camp which led him to logotherapy, an existential method of psychiatry. This work has riveted generations of readers with its descriptions of life in Nazi death camps and its lessons for spiritual survival. Between 1942 and 1945 the author, a psychiatrist labored in four different camps, including Auschwitz, while his parents, brother, and pregnant wife perished. Based on his own experience and the stories of his many patients, he argues that we cannot avoid suffering but we can choose how to cope with it, find meaning in it, and move forward with renewed purpose. His theory, known as logotherapy, from the Greek word logos (meaning), holds that our primary drive in life is not pleasure, as Freud maintained, but the discovery and pursuit of what we personally find meaningful.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (4.25)
0.5
1 9
1.5 6
2 47
2.5 18
3 243
3.5 54
4 703
4.5 96
5 919

Beacon Press

3 editions of this book were published by Beacon Press.

Editions: 080701429X, 0807014265, 0807014273

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 150,547,639 books! | Top bar: Always visible