HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

The Radical Reformission: Reaching Out…
Loading...

The Radical Reformission: Reaching Out without Selling Out (2004)

by Mark Driscoll

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
805617,575 (3.95)5
Reformation is the continual reforming of the mission of the church to enhance God's command to reach out to others in a way that acknowledges the unique times and locations of daily life. This engaging book blends the integrity of respected theoreticians with the witty and practical insights of a pastor. It calls for a movement of missionaries to seek the lost across the street as well as across the globe. This basic primer on the interface between gospel and culture highlights the contrast between presentation evangelism and participation evangelism. It helps Christians navigate between the twin pitfalls of syncretism (being so culturally irrelevant that you lose your message) and sectarianism (being so culturally irrelevant that you lose your mission). Included are interviews with those who have crossed cultural barriers, such as a television producer, exotic dancer, tattoo studio owner, and band manager. The appendix represents eight portals into the future: population, family, health/medicine, creating, learning, sexuality, and religion. Mark Driscoll was recently featured on the ABC special The Changing of Worship.… (more)

None.

None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 5 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 6 (next | show all)
Reformation is the continual reforming of the mission of the church to enhance God's command to reach out to others in a way that acknowledges the unique times and locations of daily life. This engaging book blends the integrity of respected theoreticians with the witty and practical insights of a pastor. It calls for a movement of missionaries to seek the lost across the street as well as across the globe. This basic primer on the interface between gospel and culture highlights the contrast between presentation evangelism and participation evangelism. It helps Christians navigate between the twin pitfalls of syncretism (being so culturally irrelevant that you lose your message) and sectarianism (being so culturally irrelevant that you lose your mission). Included are interviews with those who have crossed cultural barriers, such as a television producer, exotic dancer, tattoo studio owner, and band manager. The appendix represents eight portals into the future: population, family, health/medicine, creating, learning, sexuality, and religion. Mark Driscoll was recently featured on the ABC special The Changing of Worship. ( )
  jerrikobly | Jul 24, 2012 |
I must say that I wavered about this book quite a bit. Some chapters were not that great (such as the one on providing programs in the church) while others were just great (specifically how to balance culture and conviction, etc.). Driscoll is better as a preacher than he is a writer, and yet there is a lot good here, and it is well worth the read. I certainly did not agree with him on everything (he seems to suggest dropping cold evangelism completely in favor of more relationship-based evangelism, while I think both are needed since Christ did both), but we need more of this. By "this" I mean young preachers who are out in the culture and talking with people, but still take the Bible very seriously. People who are fundemental in their theology and radical in the way they deal with people and regard one another. For too long we have had churches that are old and slow with great teaching OR churches that are hip and fresh and don't teach Christ. It has always been either/or. Either a stuffy Baptist Church that will put you to sleep or an Emergent Church of a seeker-sensative church that won't bring you to Christ. Driscoll is pointing the way to a worship that is hip and fun while still focusing on Christ. Ultimately, I must give it a high ranking because of the novelty of this. ( )
  nesum | Jan 17, 2008 |
reading now ( )
  ecpowell | Mar 8, 2007 |
If you think I get an angry tone, check out Driscoll! He is passionate, and right in his critique of the modern church and the emerging church. He also has a whole chapter (nearly) on brewing beer. ( )
  theologicaldan | Jan 12, 2007 |
Showing 1-5 of 6 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (1)

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.95)
0.5
1
1.5
2 4
2.5
3 22
3.5 3
4 34
4.5 3
5 25

Zondervan

An edition of this book was published by Zondervan.

» Publisher information page

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 138,822,967 books! | Top bar: Always visible