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The Backchannel: How Audiences are Using…
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The Backchannel: How Audiences are Using Twitter and Social Media and…

by Cliff Atkinson

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Cliff Atkinson's "The Backchannel" is a guide every bit as appealing and potentially influential in the world of backchannel learning as his "Beyond Bullet Points" remains for onsite-online presentations. The book entices us into the subject immediately through a chapter carrying the title "Why Are You Calling Me a #@*% on Twitter?" and helps us see how a tweeter with a large following (nearly 15,000 people as I’m writing this) and a well-known presenter clashed quite publicly when the presenter saw the tweeter' note with her derogatory remark about him. If you already sense that Atkinson' mastery of storytelling and training is a wonderful talent to see in action, you'e well on the way to understanding that his book has something for each of us regardless of whether we’re new to the backchannel or already fairly comfortable in that rapidly-lowing stream of words and thoughts and resources. He shows us how to join a backchannel. Entertainingly reviews the rewards and risks of backchannel engagement with copious amounts of screenshots to lead us down that path. Offers presentation tips to make us more effective in our use of Twitter and its backchannels. And leads us through the process of effectively dealing with those dreaded-yet-inevitable moments when a backchannel becomes dangerous. By the time we finish racing through this book and absorbing what we can, we're far more comfortable with and appreciative of all that backchannels offer, and much more aware of how to be effective and civil members of the Twitterverse and its various interconnected streams. ( )
  paulsignorelli | May 18, 2012 |
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0321659511, Paperback)

Armed with laptops and smartphones, audiences today are no longer sitting quietly taking notes during live presentations. Instead, they’re carving out a new space in the room called the backchannel, where people are online searching for resources, checking your facts, and connecting with others inside the room and out.

When audiences are happy, the backchannel vastly extends the reach of ideas and creates a new sense of community and connectedness. But when they are unhappy, the intersection of frustrated audiences with unaware presenters can often create dramatic and public breakdowns of communication—and even mob mentality.

In this book, communications consultant Cliff Atkinson shows that if these new kinds of audience participation are embraced and the conversations properly handled, the outcome can be a new, more effective form of communicating. Whether you’re a host, presenter, or an audience member, Cliff will help you understand how this convergence of social forces is upending the presentation norm and how you can effectively manage the change.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:52:45 -0400)

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