HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Citizens of London: The Americans Who Stood…
Loading...

Citizens of London: The Americans Who Stood with Britain in Its Darkest,… (2010)

by Lynne Olson

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
313None35,324 (4.22)21

None.

Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 21 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 30 (next | show all)
I was a soldier.

I was a sailor.

I was a pilot.

I was a citizen of London.

Honestly, Citizens of London probably deserves another star but I wasn't in the right headspace to give it. However, I do know a good book when I read one.

We all know how long it took the United States to become an active participant of World World II. Lynne Olson's emphasizes just how much leg shuffling and paper pushing it took. I was even to the point of Seriously America? and the attack on Pearl Harbor happened. The British were secretly happy not because of the lives lossed but because they knew that would be the catalyst to jumpstart the US of A's participation in their losing war.

But before Pearl Harbor, these three men, Edward Murrow, Averell Harriman, and John Gilbert Winant, were working behind the scenes to help forge an alliance between Great Britain and America. Essentially, these men along with other "citizens of London helped form the relationship between Winston Churchill and FDR.

I really enjoyed Citizens of London and I'm glad it was a book club selection. This book actually goes really well as a companion piece for the Dr. Suess book, it might be called This Means War, which were a series of political cartoons detailing the United States reluctance getting into World War II.

I thought the last chapter was heartbreaking as these three men were kind of lost after WWII. After all the hustle and bustle and booming economy of war, to slow down was so excruiciating. It left them without a true purpose and some couldn't adapt to the new world (Winant) but some could (Harriman and to the most part Murrow.)

Maybe I'll give it that extra star. ( )
  Y2Ash | Apr 16, 2014 |
I was a soldier.

I was a sailor.

I was a pilot.

I was a citizen of London.

Honestly, Citizens of London probably deserves another star but I wasn't in the right headspace to give it. However, I do know a good book when I read one.

We all know how long it took the United States to become an active participant of World World II. Lynne Olson's emphasizes just how much leg shuffling and paper pushing it took. I was even to the point of Seriously America? and the attack on Pearl Harbor happened. The British were secretly happy not because of the lives lossed but because they knew that would be the catalyst to jumpstart the US of A's participation in their losing war.

But before Pearl Harbor, these three men, Edward Murrow, Averell Harriman, and John Gilbert Winant, were working behind the scenes to help forge an alliance between Great Britain and America. Essentially, these men along with other "citizens of London helped form the relationship between Winston Churchill and FDR.

I really enjoyed Citizens of London and I'm glad it was a book club selection. This book actually goes really well as a companion piece for the Dr. Suess book, it might be called This Means War, which were a series of political cartoons detailing the United States reluctance getting into World War II.

I thought the last chapter was heartbreaking as these three men were kind of lost after WWII. After all the hustle and bustle and booming economy of war, to slow down was so excruiciating. It left them without a true purpose and some couldn't adapt to the new world (Winant) but some could (Harriman and to the most part Murrow.)

Maybe I'll give it that extra star. ( )
  Y2Ash | Apr 16, 2014 |
I was a soldier.

I was a sailor.

I was a pilot.

I was a citizen of London.

Honestly, Citizens of London probably deserves another star but I wasn't in the right headspace to give it. However, I do know a good book when I read one.

We all know how long it took the United States to become an active participant of World World II. Lynne Olson's emphasizes just how much leg shuffling and paper pushing it took. I was even to the point of Seriously America? and the attack on Pearl Harbor happened. The British were secretly happy not because of the lives lossed but because they knew that would be the catalyst to jumpstart the US of A's participation in their losing war.

But before Pearl Harbor, these three men, Edward Murrow, Averell Harriman, and John Gilbert Winant, were working behind the scenes to help forge an alliance between Great Britain and America. Essentially, these men along with other "citizens of London helped form the relationship between Winston Churchill and FDR.

I really enjoyed Citizens of London and I'm glad it was a book club selection. This book actually goes really well as a companion piece for the Dr. Suess book, it might be called This Means War, which were a series of political cartoons detailing the United States reluctance getting into World War II.

I thought the last chapter was heartbreaking as these three men were kind of lost after WWII. After all the hustle and bustle and booming economy of war, to slow down was so excruiciating. It left them without a true purpose and some couldn't adapt to the new world (Winant) but some could (Harriman and to the most part Murrow.)

Maybe I'll give it that extra star. ( )
  Y2Ash | Apr 16, 2014 |
Engaging, enlightening. All the ingredients. Olson expands beyond the titular subjects, resulting, for me, in a broader and even more appealing political history of WWII, centered on U.S. - Britain relations (and relationships). The wartime lives of Murrow, Harriman, and Winant, along with their diplomatic and social circles, are all interesting and provide an intimate perspective on the tenuous, yet invigorating years of London's brave front against German bombs and the real threat of continental tyranny. ( )
  JamesMScott | Dec 11, 2013 |
Most people are unaware of the period of time immediately preceding America’s entry in World War II, mistakenly believing that the United States was quick to assist its future Allies with both material and moral support in the face of Nazi aggression. In fact, not only were an extremely large majority of people adamantly opposed to even providing significant support to the beleaguered British people, there was a sizable contingent of pro-German sympathizers.

This history tells the story of a triumvirate of American citizens who found themselves in the city of London at the height of the Battle of Britain. Edward R. Murrow, a CBS radio reporter who brought the terror of the Blitz to the American people, John Gilbert Winand, American Ambassador to England and successor to the widely despised Joseph Kennedy, and Averell Harriman, FDR’s Lend Lease coordinator. Both Winand and Harriman became close confidants to British Prime Minister Winston Churchill and became his biggest assets in a never ceasing attempt to acquire increasingly desperately needed humanitarian and military supplies in time to forestall a collapse of England.

The book paints Roosevelt as a possibly sympathetic audience, but also as a shrewd politician who was well aware that the American people and the sitting Congress would not allow U. S. entry into the European conflict absent a direct provocation. Pearl Harbor provided that provocation.

After American entry into the war, the book devolves into well-worn territory, albeit with numerous personal vignettes featuring the book’s three protagonists. FDR comes across as a pretty cold, cynical, megalomaniacal political operator in his dealings with both Churchill and Stalin, and Americans in general are painted in a rather poor light in comparison with their long suffering British allies.

In any case, the book is instructive and educational in its portrayal of the years immediately preceding American entry into the conflict, especially as seen through English eyes, and the eyes of Americans on the ground in London. ( )
1 vote santhony | Nov 4, 2013 |
Showing 1-5 of 30 (next | show all)
(Starred Review) The Anglo-American alliance in WWII was not inevitable, writes former Baltimore Sun correspondent Olson (Troublesome Young Men). In this ingenious history, she emphasizes the role of three prominent Americans living in London who helped bring it about. Best known was Edward R. Murrow, head of CBS radio's European bureau after 1937. His pioneering live broadcasts during the blitz made him a celebrity, and Olson portrays a man who worked tirelessly to win American support for Britain. Most admirable of the three was John Winant, appointed American ambassador in 1941. A true humanitarian, he skillfully helped craft the British-American alliance. And most amusing was Averell Harriman, beginning a long public service career. In 1941, FDR sent the wealthy, ambitious playboy to London to oversee Lend-Lease aid. He loved the job, but made no personal sacrifices, living a luxurious life as he hobnobbed with world leaders and carried on an affair with Churchill's daughter-in-law. Olson, an insightful historian, contrasts the idealism of Winant and Murrow with the pragmatism of Harriman. But all three men were colorful, larger-than-life figures, and Olson's absorbing narrative does them justice. 16 pages of b&w photos. (Feb.)
added by lolson4 | editPublishers Weekly (Nov 16, 2009)
 
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Book description
Haiku summary

No descriptions found.

The behind-the-scenes story of how the United States forged its wartime alliance with Britain, told from the perspective of three key American players in London: Edward R. Murrow, Averell Harriman, and John Gilbert Winant.

LibraryThing Author

Lynne Olson is a LibraryThing Author, an author who lists their personal library on LibraryThing.

profile page | author page

Quick Links

Swap Ebooks Audio
154 wanted1 pay5 pay

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (4.22)
0.5
1
1.5
2 1
2.5
3 5
3.5 5
4 27
4.5 13
5 18

Audible.com

An edition of this book was published by Audible.com.

See editions

LibraryThing Early Reviewers Alumn

Citizens of London by Lynne Olson was made available through LibraryThing Early Reviewers. Sign up to possibly get pre-publication copies of books.

 

Help/FAQs | About | Privacy/Terms | Blog | Contact | LibraryThing.com | APIs | WikiThing | Common Knowledge | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | 89,494,402 books! | Top bar: Always visible