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The Cambridge Introduction to Comedy…
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The Cambridge Introduction to Comedy (Cambridge Introductions to…

by Eric Weitz

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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0521540267, Paperback)

'Laughter', says Eric Weitz, 'may be considered one of the most extravagant physical effects one person can have on another without touching them'. But how do we identify something which is meant to be comic, what defines something as 'comedy', and what does this mean for the way we enter the world of a comic text? Addressing these issues, and many more, this is a 'how to' guide to reading comedy from the pages of a dramatic text, with relevance to anything from novels and newspaper columns to billboards and emails. The book enables you to enhance your grasp of the comic through familiarity with characteristic structures and patterns, referring to comedy in literature, film and television throughout. Perfect for drama and literature students, this Introduction explores a genre which affects the everyday lives of us all, and will therefore also capture the interest of anyone who loves to laugh.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:57:11 -0400)

How do we identify something as comedy? How does reading a comic text differ from reading other kinds of texts? How does comedy relate to social, cultural, and political issues? From Aristotle to the commedia dell'arte, from Wilde to Albee, this Introduction uses these and many other examples from the vast history and range of the comedy genre to investigate comedy's patterns, characteristics, and mechanisms. Focusing on dramatic texts, the book also refers to literature, film, and television throughout, exploring how comedy affects and inhabits other worlds and genres.… (more)

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