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Feed (Newsflesh, Book 1) by Mira Grant
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Feed (Newsflesh, Book 1) (edition 2010)

by Mira Grant

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
1,497None4,926 (3.96)170
Member:JechtShot
Title:Feed (Newsflesh, Book 1)
Authors:Mira Grant
Info:Orbit (2010), Edition: 1, Mass Market Paperback, 608 pages
Collections:Your library, Audiobooks, 2013 Challenge
Rating:***
Tags:Horror, Fiction

Work details

Feed by Mira Grant

2011 (15) apocalypse (15) bloggers (13) blogging (30) dystopia (30) dystopian (13) ebook (44) fantasy (25) fiction (127) horror (144) journalism (30) Kindle (28) Newsflesh (17) Newsflesh trilogy (12) politics (34) post-apocalyptic (64) read (21) read in 2010 (11) read in 2011 (19) read in 2012 (11) science fiction (151) series (20) sf (24) sff (11) thriller (11) to-read (106) urban fantasy (11) wishlist (12) young adult (20) zombies (254)
  1. 130
    World War Z by Max Brooks (Aerrin99, andreablythe, HenriMoreaux)
    Aerrin99: An awesome look at the world post-zombie-apocalypse with history, politics, and fantastic world building.
  2. 70
    The Walking Dead, Volume 1: Days Gone Bye by Robert Kirkman (andreablythe)
  3. 62
    The Passage by Justin Cronin (clif_hiker)
  4. 31
    Rosemary and Rue by Seanan McGuire (Aerrin99)
    Aerrin99: It may be easy to miss that Seanan McGuire and Mira Grant are the same person - both authorial roles are well worth checking out! She applies her deft skill with world-building and creating characters you adore to both her October Daye urban fantasies and her Newsflesh zombie apocalypse.… (more)
  5. 20
    Deadline by Mira Grant (bikeracer4487)
    bikeracer4487: 2nd book in the Newsflesh series
  6. 10
    Allison Hewitt is Trapped by Madeleine Roux (justrumbelledearie)
    justrumbelledearie: Another fierce female blogging the zombie apocalypse.
  7. 10
    The Strain by Guillermo Del Toro (trav)
  8. 00
    Thunder and Ashes by Z. A. Recht (HenriMoreaux)
  9. 00
    Day by Day Armageddon: Beyond Exile (Book 2) by J. L. Bourne (HenriMoreaux)
  10. 00
    Plague of the Dead by Z. A. Recht (HenriMoreaux)
  11. 00
    Warm Bodies by Isaac Marion (HenriMoreaux)
  12. 11
    Blackout by Mira Grant (bikeracer4487)
    bikeracer4487: 3rd and final book in the Newsflesh trilogy!
  13. 11
    Aftertime by Sophie Littlefield (SimonW11)
    SimonW11: a zombie apocalpse better written than most
  14. 01
    Day by Day Armageddon by J. L. Bourne (HenriMoreaux)
  15. 17
    Feed by M. T. Anderson (MyriadBooks)
    MyriadBooks: For interpretations across a similarity of title.
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» See also 170 mentions

English (150)  Hungarian (1)  All languages (151)
Showing 1-5 of 150 (next | show all)
Usually I'm not one for Zombies. I don't like gore, I don't like horror but I LOVED this book! It's the first in Mira Grant's amazing series about a pair of sibling bloggers who report the news and keep the remaining percentage of humanity updated on the Zombie infested world they have been struggling to survive in since 2014.

The book is set twenty years after 'The Rising' and follows a suspense filled and thrilling journey as the two are chosen to follow and report on the campaign of one of the presidential candidates. It's all going well and their rating are rising, but then the dead begin to rise too. Their group is attacked by a pack of the infected and things seem to go downhill from there. The main character, Georgia (George) and Shaun Mason must stay alive to uncover the truth behind the story only they have the natural paranoia and conspiracy radars to dig up. There is death, betrayal and some tear inducing moments but I like the way Mira has managed to write such an amazing politically twisted dystopia book without making her reading want to throw up from over dramatic gore and blood shed.

That's not to say there isn't some bullet-to-brain action going on ;) Spoilers!

My rating for this book is a confident 5 stars. It kept me interested, made me laugh and forced me to keep reading even when part of me didn't want to read what I knew had to be coming. If you're a fan of poking Zombies with sticks and following the antics of two reporters who risk their lives for the truth, then this is the book (series) for you.

Happy reading :) ( )
  Onyx_Jinx | Apr 10, 2014 |
When my library reserve for this book became available, I wasn't really in the mood for horror and almost didn't read it. I'm really glad I did though, because although it's a zombie novel, it doesn't fall into the horror genre at all. Instead of a bonkers, anything-goes, post-apocalyptic setting straight out of The Walking Dead, Feed portrays a world closer to our own. The author considers how all facets of our society would change if zombies were a constant threat. How would it change our approach to news, socializing, medicine, politics, pet ownership, food, funerals, etc? She approaches the question of how the zombies were created in the first place with much more scientific detail than most zombie stories do, too. I really loved the world she built and the thought she put into it.

My main complaint is that I wasn't a huge fan of the author's writing style. Its tone felt like many of the Young Adult books I've read, and as such I had to keep reminding myself that the main characters were adults in their 20s rather than teens. The dialogue was campy and overwritten at times, and the characters are often "grinning" or "whooping" or otherwise just being loud. Because of that, I was a little surprised that it was nominated for a Hugo, but I suspect that everything I mentioned enjoying about the plot was behind that. ( )
  BrookeAshley | Apr 5, 2014 |
Feed came so highly recommended by those whose opinions I trust most that I finally put aside my aversion to all things zombie and decided to read this book. And wow, am I so glad that I did. I was told that Feed did not have what you would usually expect from a book containing zombies, there weren't any vivid brain devouring scenes of blood and gore, the absence of which is what finally prompted me to pick this book up. There are essentially zombies all through this book and they are a huge part of the story, but this book is moreso about how people are surviving in a world turned to chaos and how essential an unbiased media presence would be when trying to once again create a semblance of order.

For me, the real heart of Feed was George and Shaun's story. I LOVED these characters. This adopted brother and sister pair very quickly stole my heart and their relationship fascinated me throughout the entire book. It reminded me of some documentaries that I've seen about identical twins, that they grow up relying so heavily on each other that it is difficult if not impossible to allow other people into their world. I love the way Shaun always protected his sister even though, from George's perspective, it always seemed that he was the impulsive, unruly, naughty child that she had to look out for, always warning him to stay out of trouble and worrying about his reckless behavior. But the truth was in the beautifully written small details. For example, Georgia wasn't comfortable touching people, so Shaun would automatically step up to offer a handshake when meeting someone. They knew each others thoughts and loved each other with a depth that goes beyond most siblings yet wasn't romantic or sexual even though it kind of gave that kind of vibe.

There were some slow chapters where the author gave a lot of information about the politics, the world, and journalism. I wasn't really able to relate to the constant obsession with ratings. Especially considering the way George and Shaun were raised how their parents exploited them to boost their own ratings it was hard for me to understand why they would also concern themselves so much with what seems to me such an irrelevant thing. But then, I'm not really that kind of blogger myself, things like that genuinely don't matter to me so it makes sense why its hard for me to relate to that in someone else. There were only a few small things that seemed inconsistent to me like that the senator was running on a republican ticket but almost all of his positions on things screamed democratic party but I enjoyed the story so much that these small issues were inconsequential. At the end of the day, I loved this story. Despite, or maybe even because of, the many many tears I shed at that very unexpected twist near the end. For me, that was the end of the book because I honestly can't remember what I read after that point although I know there were some more words, pages, etc after that. I just don't remember what they said.

I'm going to leave my first thoughts after turning the last page as part of this review:

My masochistic heart can do nothing but rate this book a full 5 stars. I have to commend Mira Grant on how she managed to create such a compelling story and include zombies (which I don't even like btw) and introduce me to these amazing characters that I have no choice but to fall completely in love with and then, without warning, take it all away. I can almost picture the sadistic smile on this author's face as she gleefully ripped my heart out, stomped on it, then poked it a few times with Shaun's zombie stick, leaving me a broken, sobbing mess. Nice, Mira Grant, very nice.

I highly recommend this book to anyone who enjoys dystopian fiction, sci-fi, and those who understand that not every story requires a H-E-A. ( )
  ahappybooker | Feb 7, 2014 |
Feed came so highly recommended by those whose opinions I trust most that I finally put aside my aversion to all things zombie and decided to read this book. And wow, am I so glad that I did. I was told that Feed did not have what you would usually expect from a book containing zombies, there weren't any vivid brain devouring scenes of blood and gore, the absence of which is what finally prompted me to pick this book up. There are essentially zombies all through this book and they are a huge part of the story, but this book is moreso about how people are surviving in a world turned to chaos and how essential an unbiased media presence would be when trying to once again create a semblance of order.

For me, the real heart of Feed was George and Shaun's story. I LOVED these characters. This adopted brother and sister pair very quickly stole my heart and their relationship fascinated me throughout the entire book. It reminded me of some documentaries that I've seen about identical twins, that they grow up relying so heavily on each other that it is difficult if not impossible to allow other people into their world. I love the way Shaun always protected his sister even though, from George's perspective, it always seemed that he was the impulsive, unruly, naughty child that she had to look out for, always warning him to stay out of trouble and worrying about his reckless behavior. But the truth was in the beautifully written small details. For example, Georgia wasn't comfortable touching people, so Shaun would automatically step up to offer a handshake when meeting someone. They knew each others thoughts and loved each other with a depth that goes beyond most siblings yet wasn't romantic or sexual even though it kind of gave that kind of vibe.

There were some slow chapters where the author gave a lot of information about the politics, the world, and journalism. I wasn't really able to relate to the constant obsession with ratings. Especially considering the way George and Shaun were raised how their parents exploited them to boost their own ratings it was hard for me to understand why they would also concern themselves so much with what seems to me such an irrelevant thing. But then, I'm not really that kind of blogger myself, things like that genuinely don't matter to me so it makes sense why its hard for me to relate to that in someone else. There were only a few small things that seemed inconsistent to me like that the senator was running on a republican ticket but almost all of his positions on things screamed democratic party but I enjoyed the story so much that these small issues were inconsequential. At the end of the day, I loved this story. Despite, or maybe even because of, the many many tears I shed at that very unexpected twist near the end. For me, that was the end of the book because I honestly can't remember what I read after that point although I know there were some more words, pages, etc after that. I just don't remember what they said.

I'm going to leave my first thoughts after turning the last page as part of this review:

My masochistic heart can do nothing but rate this book a full 5 stars. I have to commend Mira Grant on how she managed to create such a compelling story and include zombies (which I don't even like btw) and introduce me to these amazing characters that I have no choice but to fall completely in love with and then, without warning, take it all away. I can almost picture the sadistic smile on this author's face as she gleefully ripped my heart out, stomped on it, then poked it a few times with Shaun's zombie stick, leaving me a broken, sobbing mess. Nice, Mira Grant, very nice.

I highly recommend this book to anyone who enjoys dystopian fiction, sci-fi, and those who understand that not every story requires a H-E-A. ( )
  ahappybooker | Feb 7, 2014 |
BRILLIANT!

"The year was 2014. We had cured cancer. We had beaten the common cold. But in doing so we had created something new, something terrible that no one could stop. The infection spread, virus blocks taking over bodies and minds with one, unstoppable command: FEED."

Two-thirds of the news team which will eventually come to be known as "After the End Times," adopted siblings Georgia and Shaun Mason are used to chasing danger. (Although, as an Irwin, Shaun is much more accustomed to poking dangerous things with sticks than his Newsie sister.) Together with Fictional-slash-tech whiz Georgette "Buffy" Meissonier, as well as a supporting cast of countless beta bloggers, the After the End Times crew is devoted to pursuing the truth at any and all costs. When their team is selected out of hundreds (thousands?) of other bloggers to accompany moderate Republican Senator Peter Ryman as he embarks on his presidential campaign, some of them will be asked to pay the ultimate price, as the friends are unwittingly thrust into a shadowy conspiracy to steal the presidency, terrorize the populace, and engender fear to facilitate the hijacking of the Constitution.

Feed is unlike many zombie stories I've read of late - most notably because the zombie menace seemingly takes a backseat to political intrigue, assassination attempts, and other human-created threats. And yet I don't quite agree with other reviewers who claim that this isn't a zombie story.

Kellis-Amberlee - so named for Dr. Alexander Kellis, the scientist whose cure for the common cold was prematurely unleashed on the world by well-meaning "ecoterrorists," and Amanda Amberlee, the first child to see her cancer cured via infection with the Marburg EX19 virus (when combined, the viruses unexpectedly caused the dead to rise) - colors every aspect of this world. While the survivors are mostly able to insulate themselves from the zombie threat, it comes at a great price: large public gatherings are a thing of the past; dating mostly happens online (and it's a wonder that reproduction happens at all); privacy is sacrificed for safety at almost every turn; and people no longer have the ability to move about freely. Huge swaths of the United State are restricted, open only to those with a certain level of safety training. Kellis-Amberlee primarily causes conversion in the dead - but everyone is infected with varying levels of the virus, and spontaneous reamplification among the living and otherwise healthy is rare, but possible. The virus has effectively isolated humanity from itself. Everyone is suspect; no one can be trusted.

Likewise, the KA virus infects mammals of all species, and it can make zombies out of anyone forty pounds or larger. As a result, animal agriculture is dangerous and has mostly been abandoned. (As soon as you slaughter a cow, for example, she reanimates into a 1200 pound zombie!) While this might seem like a victory for the vegans in the house, don't pop the Barnivore-approved champagne quite yet: while de facto vegetarianism is the norm, especially brave souls can dine on smaller animals like fishes and chickens if they so desire. Pet ownership, even of cats and smaller dogs, is restricted. Mason's Law - introduced by Georgia and Shaun's adoptive parents in honor of their deceased biological son, Philip - seeks to eradicate the recreational ownership of all nonhumans over 40 pounds altogether, while some especially radical fringe elements would wipe out all large mammals if given the opportunity, in what amounts to intentional mass extinction.

The concept of "animal rights" is discussed on multiple occasions, though it (like many other things) gets twisted in this post-apocalyptic world. Here, it is animal rights advocates who side with horse breeder Emily Ryman in her right to buy, sell, show, and otherwise exploit hoses - living, breathing, sentient creatures - over those who would rather they join the ranks of dodo birds and thylacines. In reality, the animal rights position would oppose the mass slaughter of these animals - as well Ryman's "right" to create more of them.

I appreciate Grant's exploration of animals ethics; more often than not, animals are almost completely ignored in zombie tales, except inasmuch as how their presence (i.e., as a food source) affects humans.

It seems as though there are few aspects of this scary new world that Grant hasn't imagined in excruciating detail. Take, for example, the difficulties posed by zombies in crime scene investigation: a rather obvious problem, once you think about it - but then, so few people have thought about it! (At least, I know I didn't. Cue that aha! moment.) Reanimation can obscure murders, as damage inflicted pre- and postmortem can be impossible to parse out - especially when the primary goal is a quick and complete sterilization of the scene. Bodies and other evidence are routinely torched. Further, even the suspicion that someone might be infected is grounds enough to gun them down in cold blood, no questions asked. A call to the CDC to report a suspicious individual is a frighteningly easy way to intimidate an enemy, or even phone in their death sentence. Shoot first, ask question later. Freedom at gunpoint.

Feed also functions as a searing indictment of the mainstream media (which, in a completely believable lapse, fails to sound the zombie alarm soon enough) and provides an interesting look at how blogging might change the landscape of news media. The book's title references not just the zombie credo, but that of the blogging world as well: keep the feed alive.

Grant has built a world that's as rich and detailed as it is unsettling. While zombie attacks happen only rarely in Feed, they've transformed the landscape in countless ways. This new America is both recognizable - and vastly different. If the dead were to rise in 2014, this could very well be what the world looks like twenty-six years down the road.

http://www.easyvegan.info/2014/01/15/feed-by-mira-grant/ ( )
  smiteme | Jan 8, 2014 |
Showing 1-5 of 150 (next | show all)
Set more than two decades after an uprising of the living dead, Feed uses meticulous world-building to shape a narrative that’s believable, thrilling, and instantly clear.
added by Aerrin99 | editA.V. Club, Zack Handlen (May 13, 2010)
 
Shunning misogynistic horror tropes in favor of genuine drama and pure creepiness, McGuire has crafted a masterpiece of suspense with engaging, appealing characters who conduct a soul-shredding examination of what's true and what's reported.
added by Aerrin99 | editPublisher's Weekly
 

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Mira Grantprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Panepinto, LaurenCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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This book is gratefully dedicated to Gian-Paulo Musumeci and Michael Ellis.

They each asked me a question.

This is the answer.
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Our story opens where countless stories have ended in the last twenty-six years: with an idiot - in this case, my brother Shaun - deciding it would be a good idea to go out and poke a zombie with a stick to see what happens.
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0316081051, Mass Market Paperback)

The year was 2014. We had cured cancer. We had beat the common cold. But in doing so we created something new, something terrible that no one could stop. The infection spread, virus blocks taking over bodies and minds with one, unstoppable command: FEED.

NOW, twenty years after the Rising, Georgia and Shaun Mason are on the trail of the biggest story of their lives-the dark conspiracy behind the infected. The truth will out, even if it kills them.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:26:49 -0400)

(see all 2 descriptions)

"The year was 2014. We had cured cancer. We had beaten the common cold. But in doing so we had created something new, something terrible that no one could stop. The infection spread, virus blocks taking over bodies and minds with one, unstoppable command: FEED. Now, twenty years after the Rising, Georgia and Shaun Mason are on the trail of the biggest story of their lives--the dark conspiracy behind the infected. The truth will [come] out, even if it kills them."--P. [4] of cover.… (more)

(summary from another edition)

» see all 3 descriptions

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