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The Red Pyramid by Rick Riordan
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The Red Pyramid (2010)

by Rick Riordan

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: The Kane Chronicles (1)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
4,4862361,091 (3.96)176
  1. 130
    The Lightning Thief by Rick Riordan (aps3644)
    aps3644: More of Riordan's magic in a different local.
  2. 40
    The Alchemyst by Michael Scott (deslivres5)
    deslivres5: Brother-sister twins from modern San Francisco work with the famous alchemist Nicholas Flamel with and against various creatures from European myth and folklore to preserve ancient secrets.
  3. 20
    Fablehaven by Brandon Mull (elbakerone)
    elbakerone: Another great fantasy for young readers centered around a brother and sister!
  4. 00
    Smells Like Dog by Suzanne Selfors (PamFamilyLibrary)
    PamFamilyLibrary: No gods in this one, but it's got a similar style of humor and action. Well plotted.
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» See also 176 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 231 (next | show all)
Rick Riordan needs to stop making books that are completely unoriginal except for the names of the main characters. In his world, mythology just keeps repeating itself so that he can rewrite mythology in modern times. Yes, other people have taken elements of mythology and history and put them in their books, but Riordan just takes the whole story of the myth and puts it in his books and just creates his own characters who find themselves in the same situation as the people in the mythologies, but in the united states. I love mythology, but I wish that rather than rereading mythology in a goofy book, I could read something that presented new issues and new dilemmas. Maybe the monsters and bad guys in Egyptian mythology could come up with a new strategy instead of repeating the same one that they used in the past that didn't work. This would benefit Riordan in that it would create actual frightening antagonists, the plot wouldn't be as predictable as it is, and people would be able to read new rather than old (although apparently people don't care about new, as is seen in the popularity of Star Wars 7: A Slightly Newer Hope). The Nicholas Flamel series perfectly captures what Riordan could have made if he just made his own story. The mythological characters in the Flamel series don't just repeat themselves. They learn and make new plots. So while you get the actual mythological story, you also get a new and intense story with those creatures and people rather than a rewrite of old stories. ( )
  DrPedro | Mar 28, 2016 |
I know this book is meant for a younger audience, by what can I say? I love adventures! In my younger years I wanted to be an explorer and live in Egypt and discover Cleopatra's secret tomb. With that said, imagine my delight in reading this book. It has -kind of- the same spirit of The Mummy but for young adults. ( )
  mrsdanaalbasha | Mar 12, 2016 |
I know this book is meant for a younger audience, by what can I say? I love adventures! In my younger years I wanted to be an explorer and live in Egypt and discover Cleopatra's secret tomb. With that said, imagine my delight in reading this book. It has -kind of- the same spirit of The Mummy but for young adults. ( )
  mrsdanaalbasha | Mar 12, 2016 |
First off this is the first book I've read by Rick Riordan. Because of this I cannot compare it to the Percy Jackson series, which might be a good thing.


This type of novel requires lots of research, and although I wouldn't know if he tweaked anything (I'm a bit rusty on my Egyptian gods), the background information perfectly sets the stage for the story. The author's note helps to make it feel authentic and you wonder if Carter and Sadie are out there somewhere having further adventures. This type of background encourages continued reading of the series. The action moves the story forward and although there is necessary "down time" for explanations and understandings the book is well paced.

The story is told from the perspective of each sibling in turn. Carter and Sadie each have unique voices, but there were times when they were muddled. To be more specific, Carter sometimes sounds like Sadie and vice versa or Sadie used terminology that didn't exactly come across as British. This is minor in the grand scheme of things.

The diversity of the siblings is also a wonderful element to the story. The Kane parents are of different racial backgrounds and the children reflect them both: Carter is dark-skinned like his father, while Sadie is lighter-skinned with her mother's blond hair. The interjections of how Carter has to dress and act a certain way because of his skin color is an interesting addition which adds to the story and increases his relate-ability to a variety of readers.

The Red Pyramid is an enjoyable read and I would recommend it to anyone in the market for this type of story and maybe even some who aren't. Of course, this is just the beginning and I'm looking forward to the next installment. ( )
  jennk | Mar 11, 2016 |
Love it! ( )
  katieloucks | Feb 26, 2016 |
Showing 1-5 of 231 (next | show all)
“The Red Pyramid” is in almost every way an improvement over its predecessors, deeper and more emotionally resonant, and with an underlying moral and philosophical semi-seriousness. None of which takes away from the thrills.
 

» Add other authors (1 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Riordan, Rickprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Free, Kevin R.Narratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Kellgren, KatherineNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Rekiaro, IlkkaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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To all my librarian friends, champions of books, true magicians in the House of Life. Without you, this writer would be lost in the Duat.
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We only have a few hours, so listen carefully.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Book description
Since their mother’s death, Carter and Sadie have become near strangers. While Sadie has lived with her grandparents in London, her brother has traveled the world with their father, the brilliant Egyptologist, Dr. Julius Kane.

One night, Dr. Kane brings the siblings together for a "research experiment" at the British Museum, where he hopes to set things right for his family. Instead, he unleashes the Egyptian god Set, who banishes him to oblivion and forces the children to flee for their lives.

Soon, Sadie and Carter discover that the gods of Egypt are waking, and the worst of them--Set--has his sights on the Kanes. To stop him, the siblings embark on a dangerous journey across the globe--a quest that brings them ever closer to the truth about their family, and their links to a secret order that has existed since the time of the pharaohs.
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After their father's research experiment at the British Museum unleashes the Egyptian god Set, Carter and Sadie Kane embark on a dangerous journey across the globe--a quest which brings them ever closer to the truth about their family, and their links to a secret order that has existed since the time of the pharaohs.… (more)

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