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Red Hood's Revenge (PRINCESS NOVELS) (edition 2010)

by Jim C. Hines

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2671242,770 (3.9)8
Member:JessicaABaker
Title:Red Hood's Revenge (PRINCESS NOVELS)
Authors:Jim C. Hines
Info:DAW (2010), Mass Market Paperback, 352 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:*****
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Red Hood's Revenge by Jim C. Hines

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Showing 1-5 of 11 (next | show all)
Wow, that was both a really interesting plot and some great characterization. I LOVE the character of Roudette, yet another side of what a horrible past can do to a person, contrasting again with Lirea from the first book and the three main princesses. The message of all these books has been so far; you can take control of your life, but don't let your past define you. And it's a really good message I think.

I really also like Arathea; it's so nice to see a fantasy country in a fantasy world based on something other than Europe and not be completely inhabited by The Bad Guys. Talia's culture is complex and I like the contrasting relationship with its fairies to Lorindar's fairies.

But most of all I like that this complex world is merely the context for the characters. ( )
  cendri | May 30, 2014 |
The third book of Jim Hines' Princess series introduces the Lady of the Red Hood (aka Red Riding Hood) as a deadly assassin. When she draws Talia (Sleeping Beauty) out through trickery, she attacks viciously, but her failed assassination attempt leads the three princesses — Talia, Danielle (Cinderella), and Snow White — into a deeper and more deadly plot.

This was just as about as fun as the first two books, with clever, skillful, and kick ass female characters. It's nice to learn more about Talia, her origins and culture this go around. I also like that Hines continues to bring more women into the stories with each book and the interesting ways he reinterprets and weaves the fairy tale storylines together, which just adds to my glee. Great, fun, easy read. ( )
  andreablythe | May 9, 2014 |
Roudette, infamous assassin, has a new target. Everyone assumes it’s Danielle and rallies to protect her – not suspecting that Talia is her main target

Nor that simple assassination is the last thing on her mind.

Caught up in a complicated, unimaginable scheme, Danielle, Talia and Snow White are transported to Arathea, Talia’s homeland. The land where she is still wanted for murder and a home she hasn’t seen for years.

And a land under threat. It’s a bittersweet homecoming and an extremely difficult and complex on – but Talia will save her people.

I love that we got more of the backstory of Talia in this book. We’d had some backstory on Snow but, ultimately, Danielle was the star of the series and it was her story, her family and her life that we focused on; inevitably this reduced the other 2 princesses to sidekicks. This was Talia’s book – and it was also a book that was heavily influenced by aspects of her character that in so many books in this genre would either not exist – or would be alluded to then quickly shuffled into a corner never to be seen again: namely that she is a Lesbian and a WOC.

We meet Talia’s first love, and it is love not lust, they have a relationship, they reconnect and Talia clearly values her as much as her friends Snow and Danielle. She isn’t secondary to them in Talia’s eyes and Talia risks all and deviates her quest in order to reconnect with her and save her. She matters to Talia and their scenes together make that clear – which makes their ending all the more frustrating.

Most of the book also takes part in Talia’s homeland – a Fantasy Middle Eastern parallel – which manages to get a considerable sense of culture and place without resorting to so many of the really tired, offensive stereotypes. There’s a lot of effort gone into making a full culture here, with a full history and populated by actual people. Not only are they not presented with many of the damaging stereotypes, but they’re free from exoticisation as well; yes Danielle and Snow are lost, but they’re presented as just that, people from a foreign land in an unfamiliar place. It helps that we see much of the story through Talia’s eyes and she has a real sense of familiarity and home coming which flies in the face of any attempt to present an alien, strange, exotic land.

We also had some wonderful development of the world – the history of the fae, the different forms of fae and human conflict that have touched every country in the world and the legends behind that. The whole faerie church and nature of religion – both as something sincerely believed and bringing healing and help to many AND a deceptive implement of social control to forward nefarious schemes was well handled. I also like that the fae in Lorindar are very different creatures from the fae in Arathea. A lot of fantasy books miss this – we will see 8 different human nations and then “the fae.” Or “the elves”. It’s nice to see mystical woo-woo creatures that are as divided and divergent as we are – after all, why wouldn’t they be? It’s a nice touch.

Read More ( )
1 vote FangsfortheFantasy | Oct 31, 2013 |
The premise: ganked from BN.com: Wars may end. But vengeance is forever.

Roudette's story was a simple one. A red cape. A wolf. A hunter. Her mother told her she would be safe, so long as she kept to the path. But sometimes the path leads to dark places. Roudette is the hunter now, an assassin known throughout the world as the Lady of the Red Hood. Her mission will take her to the country of Arathea and an ancient fairy threat. At the heart of the conflict between humans and fairies stands the woman Roudette has been hired to kill, the only human ever to have fought the Lady of the Red Hood and survived-the princess known as Sleeping Beauty.

My Rating: Worth Reading, with Reservations

Not any many reservations. It's an enjoyable book, to be sure, but it's lacking something I can't quite put my finger on. Is it a result of the POVs, the way they slide from character to character without me noticing until it's too late, which gives me a kind of reader whiplash? I'm not sure, but I did enjoy the book and do want to read the book four, the final (?) installment in the series. I'm just not in a rush to do so. That said, I've got to give Hines a lot of credit for the Princess series so far. I love how he takes familiar fairy tales and twists them into something a wee bit darker (much like their original counterparts before they were Disney-fied) and creates an utterly believable fantasy world out of all of these seemingly unrelated tales. I'm also fascinated with the repercussions for Talia, aka Sleeping Beauty, after this novel's end. There are some wonderful tension-filled moments at the end that make me want to fast-forward twenty or so years to see what happens next, but maybe the next book will somehow address these concerns.

Fans of fairy tales and their various incarnations should definitely give this series a shot. It's fun, enjoyable, with believable characters and a solid team of heroines who talk about far more than men. Start with The Stepsister Scheme, and I'm sure you'll have lots of fun.

Spoilers, yay or nay?: Nay. It's a short review. The full review may be found at my blog, and if you're interested, click the link below to be taken direct to said full review. As always, comments and discussion are most welcome!

REVIEW: Jim C. Hines' RED HOOD'S REVENGE

Happy Reading! ( )
  devilwrites | Sep 6, 2012 |
Red Hood's Revenge is the third of Jim C. Hines' princess novels. The series, partially inspired by the original, darker versions of fairy tales with a few of Hines' own personal twists, has been well received; the second book, The Mermaid's Madness, was even long-listed for the British Fantasy Award. Personally, I have also been enjoying the series. I liked the first book, The Stepsister Scheme, and loved the second, so there was no question in my mind that I would continue reading the princess novels with Red Hood's Revenge. Additionally, I like to support local authors; Hines makes it particularly easy to want to. Red Hood's Revenge also has a major focus on my favorite character in the books--Talia, also known as Sleeping Beauty. So, while I was already looking forward to reading Red Hood's Revenge, I was even more excited when I learned about that.

Roudette, Lady of the Red Hood, one of the world's most deadly assassins, has once again come to Lorindar on a mission. She prefers fairy targets but is willing to take on any assignment that doesn't interfere with her own personal vendetta. Danielle, Snow, and Talia (Cinderella, Snow White, and Sleeping Beauty respectively) make a formidable team, but Roudette (Little Red Riding Hood) makes a formidable foe. The women's confrontation leads them to Talia's homeland of Arathea where they discover that Roudette's presence in Lorindar is only a symptom of a much greater problem. One that will eventually threaten the entire world. There is someone, or something, powerful at work in Arathea and Talia will have to confront people and incidents from her past that she would rather forget if she wants to save those she loves.

As I mentioned previously, the further development of Talia and her backstory is an important part of Red Hood's Revenge. Up until now, Hines' princess novels have focused on Lorindar and the immediately surrounding areas. It's wonderful that he gets a chance to explore another and very different part of his world. Unlike Lorindar, where fairies have been more or less isolated from the human population, in Arathea fairykind lives side by side with humankind. At least part of Arathea's culture has been inspired by Persian mythology and legends; I think the inclusion of non-Western influenced fantasy in Red Hood's Revenge is marvelous. People aren't homogeneous, so why should fairies be? Other tales that are particularly important in Red Hood's Revenge are, of course, Little Red Riding Hood as well as The Wild Hunt. At first I felt there was a bit of a culture clash between the Hunt, which is distinctly European in origin, and Arathea, but Hines makes it work in the end.

With the princess novels, Hines has created a very likeable team of strong women. And while much of the focus of Red Hood's Revenge is on Talia, Hines doesn't forget the others. Both Snow and Danielle show development in the novel. As always, Hines also introduces interesting and engaging secondary characters. The most prominent in Red Hood's Revenge is understandably Roudette, who's story is actually revealed later in the novel than I wanted it to be, but my favorite was Faziya. From the very first time she is mentioned it is obvious how important she is to Talia by the way Talia acts and behaves. Just how important she is is slowly and naturally revealed. While The Stepsister Scheme was a little stilted (but still fun), Hines has really hit his stride with the princess books with The Mermaid's Madness and Red Hood's Revenge. I'm looking forward to reading the next and final volume in the series, The Snow Queen's Shadow. It does make me a little sad, though, that the series will be ending so soon.

Experiments in Reading ( )
  PhoenixTerran | Oct 4, 2011 |
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Book description
Roudette's story was a simple one. A red cape. A wolf. A hunter.

Her mother told her she would be safe. so long as she kept to the path. But sometimes the path leads to dark places. Roudette is the hunter now, an assassin known throughout the world as the Lady of the Red Hood. Her mission will take her to Arathea and an ancient fairy threat. At the heart of the conflict between humans and fairies stands the woman Roudette has been hired to kill, the only human ever to have fought the Lady of the Red Hood and survived: the princess known as Sleeping Beauty.
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"Her mother told her she would be safe, so long as she kept to the path. But sometimes the path leads to dark places. Roudette is the hunter now, an assassin known thoughout the world as the Lady of the Red Hood. Her mission will take her to Arathea and an ancient fairy threat. At the heart of the conflict between humans and fairies stands the woman Roudette has been hired to kill, the only human ever to have fought the Lady of the Red Hood and survived: the princess known as Sleeping Beauty."--p. [4] of cover.… (more)

(summary from another edition)

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