HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

A Naked Singularity: A Novel by Sergio De La…
Loading...

A Naked Singularity: A Novel (original 2012; edition 2012)

by Sergio De La Pava

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
2331249,595 (3.96)17
Member:sn
Title:A Naked Singularity: A Novel
Authors:Sergio De La Pava
Info:University of Chicago Press (2012), Paperback, 678 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:****1/2
Tags:crime, legal, lawyers, drugs, boxing, family, immigrants, new york city

Work details

A Naked Singularity: A Novel by Sergio De La Pava (2012)

Recently added byAThurman, link_rae, bsbllbsbll, wjmcomposer, humblewomble, private library, brafter, scarper, Waynex
None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 17 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 12 (next | show all)
4.5 stars. Justice system, crime and boxing stuff great--Television and wacky neighbor stuff not so great. Should be a Coen brothers movie one day. ( )
  AThurman | Dec 7, 2014 |
Got to about page 500 when I finally admitted to myself that I didn't like the book at all and it was time to jump ship, Not often I abandon a book before finishing but time is precious.
  PossMan | Nov 19, 2014 |
Enjoyed being dumped headfirst into the opening pages. For me the book had only one voice. The various characters were well described but once they had to argue a point their voice was an echo of Casi. I soon ceased to read any of the discussions. because it was Casi in stereo. Philosophical discussions do not make for great story telling. Pity there was so much of it. Congrats to Casi for being so well educated and having so many well educated friends,

And as for the boxer - this was great blocks of filler, more showing off as to how detailed the research was. There again maybe he made it all up, who knows? How many people can name a single PR boxer? Unless you are really into boxing all of the boxing tales are simply in the way of the narrative.

Did I enjoy it - yes. Did I finish it - yes, but only because I flicked over numerous pages of digression. The end? What choice did the author leave himself? Boredom, or lack of imagination, had Casi put down as a mad dog. Kept thinking of Alice Through The Looking Glass. ( )
  quilgar | Feb 15, 2014 |
Definitely for fans of DFW and the like. I really enjoyed it, great turns of phrase, even the tangents were interesting. The end was a little much for me but I can see why he did it. ( )
  Brainannex | Oct 26, 2013 |
In many ways, this is a great novel, but it just gets too bogged down in tangents, only some of which are interesting. A stiff run with a good editor (who can keep the spirit of the book alive), would have been very welcome. I am an attorney and I have to say, this is the best book about the legal system (especially the criminal end of things) I have ever read. I felt like someone was watching over my shoulder. So the parts that were the most impressive for me were any of the legal parts, courtroom scenes, dialog with the defendants, judges, prosecutors, fellow public defenders, etc. That is where it really shined - some of the funniest and most perceptive conversations in contemporary fiction. I also loved anything having to do with Casi's family, who were awesome, hilarious and so incredibly real. The novel is steeped in machismo, so the female characters are all rather lame or objects of sexual desire or ridicule. That is where I felt it fell flat, or well, uninspired. That combined with tedious diatribes from some truly repugnant male characters who "like to smell their own farts" (for lack of a better description) made the book drag in many spots. And the ending (literally the last few pages) is terrible. But overall, it was creative, in some ways brilliant and I just always give authors a LOT of credit for using intelligence to come up with new ways of looking at fiction and ideas. Despite how comical the interactions were with the defendants, there is an underlying respect and kindness to those who have those rough roads in life. There is little question this book is not for everyone, but if you get into the first 20 pages or so, you will be hooked. Give it a try, enjoy the ride and hang in there during the boring parts. ( )
  CarolynSchroeder | Oct 24, 2013 |
Showing 1-5 of 12 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Book description
A Naked Singularity tells the story of Casi, a child of Colombian immigrants who lives in Brooklyn and works in Manhattan as a public defender--one who, tellingly has never lost a trial. Never. In the book, we watch what happens when his sense of justice and even his sense of self begin to crack--and how his world then slowly devolves. It’s a huge, ambitious novel clearly in the vein of DeLillo, Foster Wallace, Pynchon, and even Melville, and it's told in a distinct, frequently hilarious voice, with a striking human empathy at its center. Its panoramic reach takes readers through crime and courts, immigrant families and urban blight, media savagery and media satire, scatology and boxing, and even a breathless heist worthy of any crime novel. If Infinite Jest stuck a pin in the map of mid-90s culture and drew our trajectory from there, A Naked Singularity does the same for the feeling of surfeit, brokenness, and exhaustion that permeates our civic and cultural life today. In the opening sentence of William Gaddis’s A Frolic of His Own, a character sneers, "Justice? You get justice in the next world. In this world, you get the law." A Naked Singularity reveals the extent of that gap, and lands firmly on the side of those who are forever getting the law.
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0226141799, Paperback)

A Naked Singularity tells the story of Casi, a child of Colombian immigrants who lives in Brooklyn and works in Manhattan as a public defender--one who, tellingly has never lost a trial. Never. In the book, we watch what happens when his sense of justice and even his sense of self begin to crack--and how his world then slowly devolves. It’s a huge, ambitious novel clearly in the vein of DeLillo, Foster Wallace, Pynchon, and even Melville, and it's told in a distinct, frequently hilarious voice, with a striking human empathy at its center. Its panoramic reach takes readers through crime and courts, immigrant families and urban blight, media savagery and media satire, scatology and boxing, and even a breathless heist worthy of any crime novel. If Infinite Jest stuck a pin in the map of mid-90s culture and drew our trajectory from there, A Naked Singularity does the same for the feeling of surfeit, brokenness, and exhaustion that permeates our civic and cultural life today. In the opening sentence of William Gaddis’s A Frolic of His Own, a character sneers, "Justice? You get justice in the next world. In this world, you get the law." A Naked Singularity reveals the extent of that gap, and lands firmly on the side of those who are forever getting the law.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 14:04:33 -0400)

(see all 3 descriptions)

"A Naked Singularity tells the story of Casi, a child of Colombian immigrants who lives in Brooklyn and works in Manhattan as a public defender--one who, tellingly has never lost a trial. Never. In the book, we watch what happens when his sense of justice and even his sense of self begin to crack--and how his world then slowly devolves. It's a huge, ambitious novel clearly in the vein of DeLillo, Foster Wallace, Pynchon, and even Melville, and it's told in a distinct, frequently hilarious voice, with a striking human empathy at its center. Its panoramic reach takes readers through crime and courts, immigrant families and urban blight, media savagery and media satire, scatology and boxing, and even a breathless heist worthy of any crime novel. If Infinite Jest stuck a pin in the map of mid-90s culture and drew our trajectory from there, A Naked Singularity does the same for the feeling of surfeit, brokenness, and exhaustion that permeates our civic and cultural life today. In the opening sentence of William Gaddis's A Frolic of His Own, a character sneers, 'Justice? You get justice in the next world. In this world, you get the law.' A Naked Singularity reveals the extent of that gap, and lands firmly on the side of those who are forever getting the law"--Provided by publisher.… (more)

(summary from another edition)

» see all 2 descriptions

Quick Links

Swap Ebooks Audio
46 wanted2 pay

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.96)
0.5
1
1.5
2 2
2.5 1
3 5
3.5 5
4 11
4.5 3
5 10

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

Help/FAQs | About | Privacy/Terms | Blog | Contact | LibraryThing.com | APIs | WikiThing | Common Knowledge | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | 94,325,517 books! | Top bar: Always visible