HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Privatizing Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac and the…
Loading...

Privatizing Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac and the Federal Home Loan Banks: Why…

by Peter Wallison

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations
0NoneNoneNone

No tags.

None

None

None.

Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

No reviews
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0844741906, Paperback)

Many people want to tighten federal regulations governing the government-sponsored enterprises (GSEs)-Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac, and the Federal Home Loan Banks. But better regulations will not do much to reduce the real risks that the GSEs create for U.S. taxpayers and the economy, and aren't likely to have real force. Fannie and Freddie are the most politically powerful companies in America. The S&L debacle of the late 1980s showed that politically powerful organizations can intimidate regulators and stave off tough regulation. Under these circumstances, privatization-the elimination of government backing-is the only viable way to protect the taxpayers and the economy against the consequences of major financial difficulties at one or more of the GSEs. Opponents of privatization believe that Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac would be even more powerful as privatized entities. Fannie and Freddie would be able to obtain better financing than their competitors, according to this line of thinking. Concerns have also been raised about whether the privatization of Fannie and Freddie would disrupt the residential finance market or raise mortgage rates for home buyers. The plans in this book together address these concerns. Thomas H. Stanton demonstrates that it is possible to cut the ties between the government and the GSEs-and to create a fully competitive private mortgage market-without disrupting the current system of residential mortgage finance. Financial consultant Bert Ely shows that it would be possible to obtain lower mortgage rates than currently offered by Fannie and Freddie, without any government involvement. The book presents a complete legislative proposal to enact these plans, along with a detailed section-by-section analysis of the bill. Peter J. Wallison is a resident fellow at AEI and the codirector of AEI's program on financial market deregulation. Thomas H. Stanton is a Washington, D.C.-based attorney. Bert Ely is a financial institutions and monetary policy consultant.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 14:09:11 -0400)

No library descriptions found.

Quick Links

Swap Ebooks Audio

Popular covers

Rating

Average: No ratings.

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

Help/FAQs | About | Privacy/Terms | Blog | Contact | LibraryThing.com | APIs | WikiThing | Common Knowledge | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | 93,318,625 books! | Top bar: Always visible