HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Kingdom Coming: The Rise of Christian…
Loading...

Kingdom Coming: The Rise of Christian Nationalism (original 2006; edition 2006)

by Michelle Goldberg

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
4261524,790 (4.07)26
Member:occupymuskegon
Title:Kingdom Coming: The Rise of Christian Nationalism
Authors:Michelle Goldberg
Info:W.W. Norton & Co. (2006), Edition: 1, Hardcover, 256 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:
Tags:Ex Libris David G. Nye

Work details

Kingdom Coming: The Rise of Christian Nationalism by Michelle Goldberg (2006)

Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 26 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 15 (next | show all)
Goldberg, a secular Jew, provides a hard-nosed look at the agendas and power of ultra-conservative Christian organizations in the United States. Goldberg calls this trend “Christian Nationalism,” after the openly-stated goal of many fundamentalist leaders to “take back America.” From, of course, the gays, the morally decadent (such as distributors of birth control), the Darwin-lovers, and the unpatriotic atheists who believe in separation of church and state.

Goldberg comes on strong and occasionally a bit sarcastic—for example, she bemoans the way Intelligent Design proponents have flaunted academic degrees to present their theories as “something more respectable than creationism in drag”—but her anti-fundamentalist rhetoric may not be overstated at all. Her research exposes the very real underground motives of the religious right, who feel bound by their beliefs to combat a spiritually bankrupt nation. There’s no greater motivation than the conviction that one is following God’s explicit orders.

“Dominion theologians” nationwide take Genesis 1:26-28 (where God tells Adam to assume dominion of the world) as scriptural direction for Christians to assume control by divine right. The Christian duty is to seize it. Evangelists with crazed followings preach that the separation between religion and politics is “what Satan likes most,” and call for a regime that will clean up the “dung-eating dogs” (gays). Jews better repent, too, since the holocaust God planned didn’t seem to get through to them. But more dangerous than these extremists are the everyday right-wingers who are raised to carefully infiltrate government and the Judicial bench for the good of Christ, so that that our nation can be set right … so that we can quit handing out condoms, quit treating gays like they’re equals, quit pretending evolution is more scientific than creationism. Under President Bush’s lead, government grant money by the millions poured into these agendas. The back cover promises a “witty, funny” read, but I couldn’t laugh. Religion-gone-bad is jaw-droppingly frightening, and this is a hard book to put down.

Goldberg calls for action. She explains that “the anxieties that underlay Christian nationalism’s appeal—fears about social breakdown, marital instability, and cultural decline—are real. They should be acknowledged and, whenever possible, addressed. But as long as the movement aims at the destruction of secular society and the political enforcement of its theology, it has to be battled, not comforted and appeased.” ( )
2 vote DubiousDisciple | Nov 9, 2011 |
The author spent a great deal of time researching the growing, but secretive, Christian reconstructionist movement that seeks to implement God's Law, as defined in Leviticus, in the United States. A frightening narrative, particulrly when she describes the levels of power to which some of the members of this movement have risen. A must read for anyone who is complacent about the First Amendment and our right to freedom of (and from) religion. ( )
  Devil_llama | Apr 16, 2011 |
Michelle Goldberg does a good job documenting the major outlines of the Christian Nationalist (Reconstructist/Dominion Theology) movement in late 20th Century USA - our own "Texas Taliban" of fundamentalists. Touches on everything from Rushdoony to the Dover Area School District Intelligent Design case.

She's pretty professionally dispassionate in the face of a scary totalitarian worldview that

a) Is clear in its desire to destroy American pluralism and democracy

b) Doesn't let facts, science or reason get in the way of its ideology - in fact is deliberately anti-intellectual and insular

c) Has a pathological, paranoid persecution complex

d) Is naked in its ravenous desire for political power.

I got the sense that the people Goldberg interviewed would be eager to toss homosexuals and other "adulterers" into concentration camps and worse.

Definitely recommended; one of the first books in what has become a series to touch this subject, such as Kevin Phillips' American Theocracy and Max Blumenthal's Republican Gomorrah. ( )
2 vote madcatnip72 | Dec 22, 2009 |
You may have noticed this is you live in the United States, but what is arguably the most mythomaniac country on Earth has been enduring a seismic shift in the way it understands itself for the last decade or so. One of the great new ideas is that the wall of separation between church and state is just too high. "Kingdom Coming" is a fascinating exploration of the folks who want to lower or eliminate that wall, and how their carefully couched, reasonable words mask some fairly alarming beliefs. ( )
  popejephei | Jun 17, 2008 |
Scary stuff, and almost unbelievable, but it's all documented in black and white. Goldberg does an excellent job showing how this tiny radical minority has already wielded enormous influence in the Republican Party and the Bush administration. It's like a paranoid fascist nation within the nation, impervious to facts and reason. Yikes. Goldberg ends by arguing that there is no compromise or negotiating with these folks. They need to be defeated, plain and simple. Amen to that. ( )
  sabreader | Jun 13, 2008 |
Showing 1-5 of 15 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
For Matt, of course
First words
A teenage modern dance troupe dressed all in black took their places on the stage of the First Baptist Church of Pleasant Grove, a suburb of Birmingham, Alabama.
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Events are not tags.
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language
Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0393060942, Hardcover)

"A potent wakeup call to pluralists in the coming showdown with Christian nationalists."—Publishers Weekly, starred review Michelle Goldberg, a senior political reporter for Salon.com, has been covering the intersection of politics and ideology for years. Before the 2004 election, and during the ensuing months when many Americans were trying to understand how an administration marked by cronyism, disregard for the national budget, and poorly disguised self-interest had been reinstated, Goldberg traveled through the heartland of a country in the grips of a fevered religious radicalism: the America of our time. From the classroom to the mega-church to the federal court, she saw how the growing influence of dominionism-the doctrine that Christians have the right to rule nonbelievers-is threatening the foundations of democracy.

In Kingdom Coming, Goldberg demonstrates how an increasingly bellicose fundamentalism is gaining traction throughout our national life, taking us on a tour of the parallel right-wing evangelical culture that is buoyed by Republican political patronage. Deep within the red zones of a divided America, we meet military retirees pledging to seize the nation in Christ's name, perfidious congressmen courting the confidence of neo-confederates and proponents of theocracy, and leaders of federally funded programs offering Jesus as the solution to the country's social problems.

With her trenchant interviews and the telling testimonies of the people behind this movement, Goldberg gains access into the hearts and minds of citizens who are striving to remake the secular Republic bequeathed by our founders into a Christian nation run according to their interpretation of scripture. In her examination of the ever-widening divide between believers and nonbelievers, Goldberg illustrates the subversive effect of this conservative stranglehold nationwide. In an age when faith rather than reason is heralded and the values of the Enlightenment are threatened by a mystical nationalism claiming divine sanction, Kingdom Coming brings us face to face with the irrational forces that are remaking much of America. .

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:12:40 -0400)

(see all 2 descriptions)

From the Publisher: Michelle Goldberg, a senior political reporter for Salon.com, has been covering the intersection of politics and ideology for years. Before the 2004 election, and during the ensuing months when many Americans were trying to understand how an administration marked by cronyism, disregard for the national budget, and poorly disguised self-interest had been reinstated, Goldberg traveled through the heartland of a country in the grips of a fevered religious radicalism: the America of our time. From the classroom to the mega-church to the federal court, she saw how the growing influence of dominionism-the doctrine that Christians have the right to rule nonbelievers-is threatening the foundations of democracy. In Kingdom Coming, Goldberg demonstrates how an increasingly bellicose fundamentalism is gaining traction throughout our national life, taking us on a tour of the parallel right-wing evangelical culture that is buoyed by Republican political patronage. Deep within the red zones of a divided America, we meet military retirees pledging to seize the nation in Christ's name, perfidious congressmen courting the confidence of neo-confederates and proponents of theocracy, and leaders of federally funded programs offering Jesus as the solution to the country's social problems. With her trenchant interviews and the telling testimonies of the people behind this movement, Goldberg gains access into the hearts and minds of citizens who are striving to remake the secular Republic bequeathed by our founders into a Christian nation run according to their interpretation of scripture. In her examination of the ever-widening divide between believers and nonbelievers, Goldberg illustrates the subversive effect of this conservative stranglehold nationwide. In an age when faith rather than reason is heralded and the values of the Enlightenment are threatened by a mystical nationalism claiming divine sanction, Kingdom Coming brings us face to face with the irrational forces that are remaking much of America.… (more)

(summary from another edition)

» see all 3 descriptions

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (4.07)
0.5
1
1.5
2 3
2.5
3 10
3.5 5
4 33
4.5 1
5 23

W.W. Norton

2 editions of this book were published by W.W. Norton.

Editions: 0393060942, 0393329763

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 126,518,420 books! | Top bar: Always visible