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The Red Queen (Cousins' War #2) by Philippa…
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The Red Queen (Cousins' War #2) (edition 2012)

by Philippa Gregory

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1,9311003,538 (3.56)109
Member:tzugirl
Title:The Red Queen (Cousins' War #2)
Authors:Philippa Gregory
Info:Pocket Books (2012), Edition: Reprint, Mass Market Paperback, 464 pages
Collections:Read but unowned
Rating:***
Tags:fiction, historical, england, tudor, royalty

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The Red Queen by Philippa Gregory

Recently added bycjmachek, mscreant, private library, arenie5000, Sirolf, CathyWacksman, chelakw, AshwinRamaswamy
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Showing 1-5 of 98 (next | show all)
I found this book rather overwhelming. I didn't feel it was the fault of the author so much as the subject matter. Writing about the obsessively religious Margaret Beaufort, there would be that dark suffocating feeling due to the character and her background and personality. Other than that I enjoyed how, even as suppressing as it felt at times, the reading flowed. It filled in gaps the I had from the White Queen. I look forward to reading Philippa Gregory's other works. ( )
  mhowar19 | Apr 21, 2016 |
I'm late to this series, but I love it. This is the more realistic book of these series, more political history than mysterious and fantastical women behind the scenes. Many like it the least because of that, but I think it does a great job of showing how fanatically crazy this woman was in a way that had to have influenced her son to come and win the battle of his young life and the other side of "A Kingdom for My Horse." Also weaving in how the Joan of Arc story influenced her. Very Cool. ( )
  sydsavvy | Apr 8, 2016 |
I noted the history aspect, but book over all was a little slow.
  brandymuss | Mar 15, 2016 |
I'm really loving this series. Far better than Gregory's Tudor series. It's not very often I can love a book while absolutely hating the main character whose point of view the book is set from. Margaret Beaufort is a horrible woman! But it didn't detract away from the book for me at all. Still hoping she gets some kind pf comeuppance tho. Can't wait to read more of this series of remarkable women. ( )
  Rogue-Phoenix | Feb 12, 2016 |
Oh this was so much better than The White Queen! I still find the whole Plantagenet/War of the Roses thing confusing: so many dukes and princes with the same name, but this time it made more sense, maybe because I've a better understanding of the Tudors or maybe constant consultation of my trusty book on The King & Queens of England by ER Delderfield has finally done the trick. Either way, this made more sense and, thankfully, did not contain all the stupid witchcraft of The White Queen.

So this one centres on Margaret Beaufort, descendent of John of Gaunt and heir to the House of Lancaster. At a jaw droppingly early age, she is married to Edmund Tudor (who also has a claim to the throne) to cement their prospects. By the age of 13 she is a widow and pregnant. The child she bore would one day be Henry VI. The book covers her scheming and plotting to ensure that her son survives and makes it to the throne.

She is portrayed as a very pious and devout woman and historical works all seem to agree with this. She's also portrayed as an unpleasant, cold and scheming woman whose sole existance centred on plotting regardless of the safety of those around her. Who can say if this is true or not.

Regardless, this is a return to form for the author as far as I'm concerned. I'll probably give The Lady of the Rivers a miss as it, undoubtably, will be based around the witchcraft allegations again, but The Kingmakers Daughter may well find its way onto Mount TBR in the future.
( )
  Cassandra2020 | Jan 24, 2016 |
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The light of the open sky is brilliant after the darkness of the inner rooms. I blink and hear the roar of many voices. But this is not my army calling for me, this whisper growing to a rumble is not their roar of attack, the drumming of their swords on shields. The rippling noise of linen in the wind is not my embroidered angels and lilies against the sky, but cursed English standards in the triumphant May breeze. This is a different sort of roar from our beloved hymns, this is a howl of people hungry for death: my death.
The light of the open sky is brilliant after the darkness of the inner rooms.
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An heiress to the red rose of Lancaster, Margaret Beaufort believes that her house is the true ruler of England and that she has a great destiny. Her ambitions are disappointed when her cousin King Henry VI fails to recognize her as a kindred spirit, and she's even more dismayed when he sinks into madness. Sent into remote Wales to marry a man twice her age, quickly widowed, and a mother at only 14, Margaret is determined to turn her lonely life into a triumph. She sets her heart on putting her son on the throne of England regardless of the cost to herself, to England, and even to the little boy. Disregarding rival heirs and the overwhelming power of the York dynasty, she sends her son Henry into exile in France and pledges him in marriage to a daughter of her enemy, Elizabeth of York. As the political tides constantly move and shift, Margaret charts her own way through another loveless marriage, treacherous alliances, and secret plots. She feigns loyalty to the new king, Richard III, and even carries his wife’s train at her coronation.

Widowed a second time, Margaret marries the ruthless, deceitful Thomas, Lord Stanley. Gambling her life and her son's future that he will support her, she then masterminds one of the greatest rebellions of the time — all the while knowing that her son has grown to manhood, recruited an army, and now waits for his opportunity to win the greatest prize.
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Married to a man twice her age, quickly widowed, and a mother at only fourteen, Margaret Beaufort is determined to turn her lonley life into a triumph. She sets her heart on putting her son on the throne of England regardless of the cost to herself, England, and even her son. Disregarding rival heirs and the overwhelming power of the York dynasty, she names him Henry, like the king; sends him into exile; and pledges him in marriage to her enemy Elizabeth of York's daughter. As the political tides constantly move and shift, Margaret charts her own way through another loveless marriage, treacherous alliances and secret plots, always with her ultimate goal before her.… (more)

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