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Wicked Girls: A Novel of the Salem Witch…
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Wicked Girls: A Novel of the Salem Witch Trials

by Stephanie Hemphill

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2.5 stars

This is a fictional account of the Salem witch trials, mostly told from the points of view of three of the girls who accused many of the people, two 17-year olds and one 12-year old.

I was initially excited to find a fictional book about the Salem witches, but I skipped entire first chapter, thinking it was a quote. Suddenly the 2nd chapter started with another “quote” and I realized – oh, crap! I think the entire book is written this way: like poetry. Or, I guess the term is “in verse”. Not a fan. I skim/read that kind of thing quickly, and don’t really pay attention.

The good part: it was quick! The book did go right at the end with the notes on the real-life people, both the accusers and the accused. Also a note, in general, on why they may have accused so many people. That gave it the extra ½ star, but I’d still like to find a good fictional work on this topic. ( )
  LibraryCin | Aug 29, 2017 |
This fictional account of the Salem witch trials is told in verse by three of the "afflicted girls". When I first saw that, I actually returned the book to the library, sections of books told this way are okay but the idea of reading a whole book this way kind of made my head spin. But I left my book at home last Saturday and decided to give this another shot. In the beginning I found it confusing, I had to keep going to beginning where they gave a brief description of who the main characters were. Once I got into it I really liked it. I was afraid the verse style would focus more on sounding pretty then getting the story told but that wasn't the case at all. I got a very clear picture of what each of the three girls was going through and what they were thinking and going through.

The author gave this tale the spin that the girls felt powerless in their roles as young girls among the Puritans, and this was a way for them to gain power. It was really interesting to see how Ann Putnam's mother manipulated her to take revenge on people and how Ann tried to manipulate her back. I was glad to see the girls feeling guilty although it sometimes felt as though they weren't feeling guilty enough, particulalry the little girls and Margaret who was more obsessed with herself then anything else going on. Susannah really had me thinking, because she didn't fit in with the others and Margaret was the one who told others she was being afflicted. I sometimes wondered if Susannah's affliction wasn't actual siezures or something like that. But that just might be me reading too much into the text.

I really appreciate the authors addition of two sections in the back, one telling us who characters were based on and what happened to them after the trials and a very brief discussion of the various theories regarding why the girls accused others of witchcraft. ( )
  Rosa.Mill | Nov 21, 2015 |
This fictional account of the Salem witch trials is told in verse by three of the "afflicted girls". When I first saw that, I actually returned the book to the library, sections of books told this way are okay but the idea of reading a whole book this way kind of made my head spin. But I left my book at home last Saturday and decided to give this another shot. In the beginning I found it confusing, I had to keep going to beginning where they gave a brief description of who the main characters were. Once I got into it I really liked it. I was afraid the verse style would focus more on sounding pretty then getting the story told but that wasn't the case at all. I got a very clear picture of what each of the three girls was going through and what they were thinking and going through.

The author gave this tale the spin that the girls felt powerless in their roles as young girls among the Puritans, and this was a way for them to gain power. It was really interesting to see how Ann Putnam's mother manipulated her to take revenge on people and how Ann tried to manipulate her back. I was glad to see the girls feeling guilty although it sometimes felt as though they weren't feeling guilty enough, particulalry the little girls and Margaret who was more obsessed with herself then anything else going on. Susannah really had me thinking, because she didn't fit in with the others and Margaret was the one who told others she was being afflicted. I sometimes wondered if Susannah's affliction wasn't actual siezures or something like that. But that just might be me reading too much into the text.

I really appreciate the authors addition of two sections in the back, one telling us who characters were based on and what happened to them after the trials and a very brief discussion of the various theories regarding why the girls accused others of witchcraft. ( )
  Rosa.Mill | Nov 21, 2015 |
This fictional account of the Salem witch trials is told in verse by three of the "afflicted girls". When I first saw that, I actually returned the book to the library, sections of books told this way are okay but the idea of reading a whole book this way kind of made my head spin. But I left my book at home last Saturday and decided to give this another shot. In the beginning I found it confusing, I had to keep going to beginning where they gave a brief description of who the main characters were. Once I got into it I really liked it. I was afraid the verse style would focus more on sounding pretty then getting the story told but that wasn't the case at all. I got a very clear picture of what each of the three girls was going through and what they were thinking and going through.

The author gave this tale the spin that the girls felt powerless in their roles as young girls among the Puritans, and this was a way for them to gain power. It was really interesting to see how Ann Putnam's mother manipulated her to take revenge on people and how Ann tried to manipulate her back. I was glad to see the girls feeling guilty although it sometimes felt as though they weren't feeling guilty enough, particulalry the little girls and Margaret who was more obsessed with herself then anything else going on. Susannah really had me thinking, because she didn't fit in with the others and Margaret was the one who told others she was being afflicted. I sometimes wondered if Susannah's affliction wasn't actual siezures or something like that. But that just might be me reading too much into the text.

I really appreciate the authors addition of two sections in the back, one telling us who characters were based on and what happened to them after the trials and a very brief discussion of the various theories regarding why the girls accused others of witchcraft. ( )
  Rosa.Mill | Nov 21, 2015 |
This fictional account of the Salem witch trials is told in verse by three of the "afflicted girls". When I first saw that, I actually returned the book to the library, sections of books told this way are okay but the idea of reading a whole book this way kind of made my head spin. But I left my book at home last Saturday and decided to give this another shot. In the beginning I found it confusing, I had to keep going to beginning where they gave a brief description of who the main characters were. Once I got into it I really liked it. I was afraid the verse style would focus more on sounding pretty then getting the story told but that wasn't the case at all. I got a very clear picture of what each of the three girls was going through and what they were thinking and going through.

The author gave this tale the spin that the girls felt powerless in their roles as young girls among the Puritans, and this was a way for them to gain power. It was really interesting to see how Ann Putnam's mother manipulated her to take revenge on people and how Ann tried to manipulate her back. I was glad to see the girls feeling guilty although it sometimes felt as though they weren't feeling guilty enough, particulalry the little girls and Margaret who was more obsessed with herself then anything else going on. Susannah really had me thinking, because she didn't fit in with the others and Margaret was the one who told others she was being afflicted. I sometimes wondered if Susannah's affliction wasn't actual siezures or something like that. But that just might be me reading too much into the text.

I really appreciate the authors addition of two sections in the back, one telling us who characters were based on and what happened to them after the trials and a very brief discussion of the various theories regarding why the girls accused others of witchcraft. ( )
  Rosa.Mill | Nov 21, 2015 |
Showing 1-5 of 29 (next | show all)
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Epigraph
Dedication
For Alessandra
First words
Silent, not even the twitter
of insects.  The wind stills
against a distant sky of clouds.
The cold is gray and fierce,
bitter as a widow at the grave.
The trees' bare bony fingers
point crookedly
toward Heaven or Hell
or worse than that, toward nowhere.
Quotations
Margaret's face turns dust and ice.
She says, "I fear we let loose
a thing what leads to the grave."
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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pack 1
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A fictionalized account, told in verse, of the Salem witch trials, told from the perspective of three young women living in Salem in 1692--Mercy Lewis, Margaret Walcott, and Ann Putnam, Jr.

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