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A Hermit in the Himalayas by Paul Brunton
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A Hermit in the Himalayas (1936)

by Paul Brunton

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English (3)  French (1)  All languages (4)
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One of the great classics of spiritual literature, Paul Brunton was one of a very small number of his generation to travel so extensively throughout India and Tibet at a time when very few were doing so with such insight and discernment. His journalistic skills produced magnificent descriptions of the snowy peaks and high-desert landscapes of the Himalayan region but it was the lessons he learned from the holy men he met on his journey that transformed him into one of the great interpreters of the East. In this magnificent classic he explains that we all need 'oases of calm in a world of storm', no matter what era we are living in, and that to retreat from our everyday lives for a while is not weakness but strength. By taking the trouble to discover the deep silence within us we will find the benefits of being linked to an 'infinite power, an infinite wisdom, an infinite goodness'. A Hermit In The Himalayas is a fascinating blend of travel narrative and profound spiritual experience. As we accompany the author on his journey through the vast Himalayas ranges towards Mount Kailas in Tibet, he also shows us an even more remarkable - and timeless - inner path which will help us cope with the ups and downs of our contemporary world.

About the Author:

Born in London in 1898, Paul Brunton published thirteen books between 1935 and 1952. He is generally recognized as one of the key people to have introduced yoga and meditation to the West, and for presenting their philosophical background in non-technical language. He died in Switzerland (where he lived for 20 years) in 1981.
  saraswati_library_mm | Mar 15, 2010 |
One of the great classics of spiritual literature, Paul Brunton was one of a very small number of his generation to travel so extensively throughout India and Tibet at a time when very few were doing so with such insight and discernment. His journalistic skills produced magnificent descriptions of the snowy peaks and high-desert landscapes of the Himalayan region but it was the lessons he learned from the holy men he met on his journey that transformed him into one of the great interpreters of the East. In this magnificent classic he explains that we all need 'oases of calm in a world of storm', no matter what era we are living in, and that to retreat from our everyday lives for a while is not weakness but strength. By taking the trouble to discover the deep silence within us we will find the benefits of being linked to an 'infinite power, an infinite wisdom, an infinite goodness'. A Hermit In The Himalayas is a fascinating blend of travel narrative and profound spiritual experience. As we accompany the author on his journey through the vast Himalayas ranges towards Mount Kailas in Tibet, he also shows us an even more remarkable - and timeless - inner path which will help us cope with the ups and downs of our contemporary world.

About the Author:

Born in London in 1898, Paul Brunton published thirteen books between 1935 and 1952. He is generally recognized as one of the key people to have introduced yoga and meditation to the West, and for presenting their philosophical background in non-technical language. He died in Switzerland (where he lived for 20 years) in 1981.
  Saraswati_Library | Feb 16, 2010 |
The back cover describes this book as "literary miscellany--a blend of travel narrative and profound spiritual experience."

CONTENTS:
I. The Philosophy of Friendship; On Pony-back in the Himalayas; My Bungalow on a Mountain-top
II. Projected Expedition to Mount Kailas in Tibet; Magnificence of the Snowy Mountain Scenery; I Discover 'The Sanctuary'
III. A Meditation on British Rule in India and on Political Strife; Necessity of Spiritualizing Politics; The Control of Thoughts; A Secret of Concentration
IV. My Quest of Inner Stillness; The Remembrance of Former Births; A Buddhist Method of Tapping Pre-natal Memory; Nature's Purpose with Mankind; On Unity with Nature
V. Unexpected Visit by Two Yogis; Pilgrims and Shrines in the Himalayas; Power out of Stillness
VI. A Cross-section Through My Mail; A Would-be Suicide and My Answer; Telephathic Aid to Students
VII. Reflections Upon the Future of Tibet; Sir Francis Younghusband's Experiences; Destiny of Orient and Occident
VIII. A Correspondent Decries My Retreat from the World; The Virtues of Idleness and Solitude; My Religion; The New Testament; Jesus and His Critics
IX. Storm; Precursors of the Monsoon; My Animal Visitors; The Question of Clothes
X. Another Visit by a Yogi; His Adventurous Journey from Kashmir to Mount Kailas; His Wanderings in Western Tibet; How his Master Lived Naked Amid the Snow; Explanations of the Feat
XI. On Philosophy and Fun; Reflections on Mr. Charles Chaplin; His Silent Art and Genius; The Necessity of Modernizing Yoga; The Inadvisability of Asceticism; Some Truths about Sex and Yoga
XII. A Sacred Influx in the Stillness; Mountain-climbing Expeditions and Their Significance
XIII. An Encounter with a Panther; The Problem of Nature's Cruelty
XIV. A Visit of a Nepalese Prince; A Queer Experience with a Fakir and a Spirit; We Explore a Beautiful River Valley; An Adventure with a Mad Elephant; Buddhism in Nepal; Krishna and Buddha Compared
XV. My Nightly Vigils in the Open; Reflections on the Stars; The Truth about Astrology; The Mystery of Sirius; Are the Planets Peopled? ; The Symbolism of the Sun; The Deodar Tree Speaks; Farewell to My Bungalow
XVI. I Set Out Again on Horseback; Gorgeous Panorama in Tehri State; My Journey Along the Ridge-Tops and Mountain Trails; Through the Forests in the Darkness; I Arrive at Pratapnagar
XVII. The Snowy Giants of Himalaya; An Attack by a Bear
XVIII. The Delights of Tea-drinking; How the Monsoon Storms Break Out
  WARM | Feb 28, 2008 |
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