HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Corduroy by Don Freeman
Loading...

Corduroy (original 1968; edition 1968)

by Don Freeman

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
5,274None838 (4.22)30
Member:libr202team4
Title:Corduroy
Authors:Don Freeman
Info:Viking Juvenile (1968), Edition: 18th Printing, Hardcover, 28 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:
Tags:None

Work details

Corduroy by Don Freeman (1968)

adventure (79) animals (90) bear (138) bears (306) BFIAR (36) button (52) buttons (63) children (106) children's (201) children's book (31) children's books (35) children's literature (68) classic (94) classics (30) Corduroy (104) fantasy (102) fiction (265) friends (75) friendship (273) home (41) K (48) kids (37) love (76) picture (38) picture book (374) read (33) Spanish (31) stuffed animals (60) teddy bears (206) toys (164)
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 30 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 149 (next | show all)
Author Don Freemen
Title Corduroy
Illustrator Don Freemen
Publisher Scholastic
Pages 32

Main plot short summary: This bear named corduroy has a friend named Lisa. This bear is Lisa's best friend. This book tells about Corduroy. This bear has a button on his overalls and he looses the button. Lisa's mom makes corduroy another button and things are all better now.

Tags or subject headings would be friendship and bonding. Lisa becomes best friends with this little bear and this bears best friend is Lisa. There is another book called a pocket for Corduroy that is a good book also that shows how true their friendship is through Corduroy getting lost at the laundry mat.

Personal response. I love the Corduroy books. I use to read them when I was younger and I still enjoy reading them today. ( )
  Mihalevich | Apr 14, 2014 |
I love this book! There are two reasons why I like this book. First, I like the book because of the illustrations. I think the illustrations fit the style of writing. On each page the illustrations clearly depict what is being said in the text. I think this helps students to connect what is happening in the story if they stumble while reading the text. Readers can use the illustrations to help their understanding and comprehension. The second reason I like this story is because of the plot. I think it is an adorable story that can be relatable to many children. Corduroy is longing to have a home. I think the part when the little girl’s mother won’t let her buy Corduroy and “Corduroy watched them sadly as they walked away,” makes the reader feel sympathetic and draws them into the plot. Growing up, many children have that special stuffed animal that they love or that they could not wait to buy. I think the story of Corduroy could be relatable to many students and has a fun plot that tells the story of a bear looking for his missing button. ( )
  awalls4 | Apr 10, 2014 |
Every child should read the book Corduroy. I was introduced to it at a very young age and it became one of my favorite bedtime stories. As a child, I always wondered if my toys came alive when no one was watching and Corduroy proves it to be true! Because Corduroy is missing a button on his overalls, many people overlook him and do not want to buy him, until Lisa comes along. She does not care about his missing button, and sews a new button on him when she brings him home. I always loved how this book had such a happy ending when Corduroy finds a new home. I remember wanting to bring my piggybank into the toy store just like the little girl Lisa did in the story and buying a teddy just like Corduroy. The illustrations are very colorful and kid friendly and clearly show Corduroy's emotions throughout the book. The main message in this book is to never judge someone by their physical appearance (in this case, Corduroy was missing a button but was still an amazing friend and toy for Lisa). ( )
  jjones58 | Apr 10, 2014 |
I really liked this book for a few reasons. One, Corduroy the bear has a curiosity and drive that lots of children have: He wants to find his button and is curious about the new things he sees while wandering the mall. He almost breaks a lamp while trying to tear off a button from a mattress because he thinks it belongs to him. He also repeats a similar phrase over again: "I think I've always wanted to..." and "I guess I've always wanted to..." These phrases show that he is open to the new things he is experiencing on his journey to find his button. The little girl, Lisa, who wants to buy Corduroy also exhibits some drive. She comes back the following day after first seeing Corduroy and heads straight for the counter and buys him, since she had enough money in her piggy bank to do so. I also like the illustrations because they are easy to follow and line up completely with the lines that are written on that page. Sometimes, two pages share one sentence and the sentence is broken up onto those two pages with the illustrations that show two different things happened. The big idea of this book is do not give up on what you are looking for, because you might find it where you least expect it. This is shown through Lisa giving Corduroy a new button, and Corduroy saying, "'You must be a friend...I've always wanted a friend.'" ( )
  lstec2 | Mar 19, 2014 |
This story about a bear that is on display at a local department store. A little girl hopes to buy him, but her mother doesn't have enough money to buy him. The little girl tells Corduroy that she will be back to buy him. Corduroy starts to feel sad after he notices that he is missing a button. He thinks he is broken and that is why no one will buy him. He tries to search through the store to find a button but doesn't have any luck. But eventually his luck changes, as the little returns the next day to buy him. She then takes Corduroy home and sews on a button.

This is a cute story for Pre-k through first grade. There's no great lesson to the story, except maybe to never lose confidence in one's self. I don't know that I'd use this so much as a teaching or just for an enjoyable read aloud. ( )
  breksarah | Feb 26, 2014 |
Showing 1-5 of 149 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
To Sally Elizabeth Kildow and Patrick Steven Duff Kildow, who know how a bear feels about buttons
First words
Corduroy is a bear who once lived in a toy department of a big store.
Quotations
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Book description
Have you ever dreamed of being locked in a department store at night? The endearing story of Corduroy paints a picture of the adventures that might unfold (for a teddy bear at least) in such a situation. When all the shoppers have gone home for the night, Corduroy climbs down from the shelf to look for his missing button. It's a brave new world! He accidentally gets on an elevator that he thinks must be a mountain and sees the furniture section that he thinks must be a palace. He tries to pull a button off the mattress, but he ends up falling off the bed and knocking over a lamp. The night watchman hears the crash, finds Corduroy, and puts him back on the shelf downstairs. The next morning, he finds that it's his lucky day! A little girl buys him with money she saved in her piggy bank and takes him home to her room. Corduroy decides that this must be home and that Lisa must be his friend. Youngsters will never get tired of this toy-comes-alive tale with a happy ending, so you may also want to seek out Dan Freeman's next creation, A Pocket for Corduroy. (Ages 3 to 8)
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Amazon.com Review (ISBN 0670063363, Hardcover)

Have you ever dreamed of being locked in a department store at night? The endearing story of Corduroy paints a picture of the adventures that might unfold (for a teddy bear at least) in such a situation. When all the shoppers have gone home for the night, Corduroy climbs down from the shelf to look for his missing button. It's a brave new world! He accidentally gets on an elevator that he thinks must be a mountain and sees the furniture section that he thinks must be a palace. He tries to pull a button off the mattress, but he ends up falling off the bed and knocking over a lamp. The night watchman hears the crash, finds Corduroy, and puts him back on the shelf downstairs. The next morning, he finds that it's his lucky day! A little girl buys him with money she saved in her piggy bank and takes him home to her room. Corduroy decides that this must be home and that Lisa must be his friend. Youngsters will never get tired of this toy-comes-alive tale with a happy ending, so you may also want to seek out Dan Freeman's next creation, A Pocket for Corduroy. (Ages 3 to 8)

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:45:38 -0400)

(see all 8 descriptions)

A toy bear in a department store wants a number of things, but when a little girl finally buys him he finds what he has always wanted most of all.

(summary from another edition)

» see all 9 descriptions

Quick Links

Swap Ebooks Audio
17 avail.
70 wanted
1 pay6 pay

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (4.22)
0.5
1 4
1.5 1
2 15
2.5 4
3 108
3.5 13
4 198
4.5 27
5 301

Audible.com

Three editions of this book were published by Audible.com.

See editions

Penguin Australia

Four editions of this book were published by Penguin Australia.

Editions: 0140501738, 0140542523, 0670063363, 0670013110

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

Help/FAQs | About | Privacy/Terms | Blog | Contact | LibraryThing.com | APIs | WikiThing | Common Knowledge | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | 89,485,825 books! | Top bar: Always visible