HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Corduroy (Book and Bear) by Don Freeman
Loading...

Corduroy (Book and Bear) (original 1968; edition 2008)

by Don Freeman

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
7,283311487 (4.26)46
Member:kirby.kirschmann
Title:Corduroy (Book and Bear)
Authors:Don Freeman
Info:Viking Juvenile (2008), Edition: Har/Toy, Hardcover, 32 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:****
Tags:fiction, classic, friendship, dedication, fantasy, acceptance, reluctant readers

Work details

Corduroy by Don Freeman (1968)

Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 46 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 311 (next | show all)
Corduroy the bear wants a home and his own bed. He believes no one wants him because he has lost a button, he goes on a hunt to find his button only to be taken home by a sweet girl who makes him her friend and gives him a bed of his own. ( )
  SaraLancon | Apr 17, 2017 |
Corduroy lost his button and is seen as unwanted by everyone in the store until one young girl and her mother see him. The mother says no because of the lost button but the young girl brings her own money back to the store and then buys Corduroy. This book is a read aloud book for children in the age range of 3-5. Corduroy is a vocabulary word and could be challenging for students to read. ( )
  KalleyNeidermire | Apr 14, 2017 |
A feel good classic about a little girl by the name of Lisa wanting to by this bear with a missing button and mom not allowing her to do so, but she stays patient and finds away to use her own money to go back and buy her new best friend.
I recommend this book to 2 years old up to kindergarten. ( )
  hillard | Apr 13, 2017 |
I thought this was really cute children’s book. I think the message is something that is relatable and instead of using children to show the message, the author used a toy. This book teaches children the importance of friendship and that everyone deserves to have a friend who likes you for who you are and doesn’t care what you look like. Readers also see Corduroy try to change himself so someone would buy him but a little girl still buys him even thought he’s missing a button. The little girl tells Corduroy, “I like you the way you are, she said but you’ll be more comfortable with your shoulder strap fastened.” I think this is a lesson that children should learn right away because bullying is becoming a big problem today and children need to learn to accept each other for who they are and that you don’t have to change yourself to be accepted by others. Someone will like you for who you are.
I thought this book was really engaging. I think it’s an easy book for children to connect to and the pictures are realistic. Teaches readers the importance of accepting people for who they are. ( )
  SamanthaTorsland | Apr 1, 2017 |
In the book "Corduroy", a bear named Corduroy is in the toy store when a little girl finds him. Her mother refuses to buy him because his button is missing. The central message of this book is that just because something does not have all of its pieces, does not make it any less valuable. The little girl took Corduroy home and found a button that she eventually sewed onto his overalls. This shows that you can always fix something that is broken and just because it is broken, does not mean it is any less than others. ( )
  LaurenToth | Mar 29, 2017 |
Showing 1-5 of 311 (next | show all)
This book brings back many memories for me as a child, I asked my mom to read this book every night to be. This book is a sweet book about a teddy bear, that is in a mall, and wants someone to take him home. The reason this was my favorite book is because, the story was from the point of view of the teddy bear. Most kids who have teddy bears will thoroughly enjoy this story. There is also an element of humor, when the police officer hears the teddy bear, the bear hides with the other toys as a disguise. I also love the illustrations in the book, because they give you a better understanding of the book. Since the book is from the point of view of the bear, he states that he thinks he is in a palace, but because of the pictures the reader knows it is a shopping mall, and he is in the home department in a store.
 
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
To Sally Elizabeth Kildow and Patrick Steven Duff Kildow, who know how a bear feels about buttons
First words
Corduroy is a bear who once lived in a toy department of a big store.
Quotations
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (1)

Book description
Have you ever dreamed of being locked in a department store at night? The endearing story of Corduroy paints a picture of the adventures that might unfold (for a teddy bear at least) in such a situation. When all the shoppers have gone home for the night, Corduroy climbs down from the shelf to look for his missing button. It's a brave new world! He accidentally gets on an elevator that he thinks must be a mountain and sees the furniture section that he thinks must be a palace. He tries to pull a button off the mattress, but he ends up falling off the bed and knocking over a lamp. The night watchman hears the crash, finds Corduroy, and puts him back on the shelf downstairs. The next morning, he finds that it's his lucky day! A little girl buys him with money she saved in her piggy bank and takes him home to her room. Corduroy decides that this must be home and that Lisa must be his friend. Youngsters will never get tired of this toy-comes-alive tale with a happy ending, so you may also want to seek out Dan Freeman's next creation, A Pocket for Corduroy. (Ages 3 to 8)
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Amazon.com Review (ISBN 0670063363, Hardcover)

Have you ever dreamed of being locked in a department store at night? The endearing story of Corduroy paints a picture of the adventures that might unfold (for a teddy bear at least) in such a situation. When all the shoppers have gone home for the night, Corduroy climbs down from the shelf to look for his missing button. It's a brave new world! He accidentally gets on an elevator that he thinks must be a mountain and sees the furniture section that he thinks must be a palace. He tries to pull a button off the mattress, but he ends up falling off the bed and knocking over a lamp. The night watchman hears the crash, finds Corduroy, and puts him back on the shelf downstairs. The next morning, he finds that it's his lucky day! A little girl buys him with money she saved in her piggy bank and takes him home to her room. Corduroy decides that this must be home and that Lisa must be his friend. Youngsters will never get tired of this toy-comes-alive tale with a happy ending, so you may also want to seek out Dan Freeman's next creation, A Pocket for Corduroy. (Ages 3 to 8)

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:17:16 -0400)

(see all 8 descriptions)

A toy bear in a department store wants a number of things, but when a little girl finally buys him he finds what he has always wanted most of all.

(summary from another edition)

» see all 17 descriptions

Quick Links

Swap Ebooks Audio
8 avail.
67 wanted
2 pay6 pay

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (4.26)
0.5
1 4
1.5 1
2 21
2.5 4
3 170
3.5 18
4 314
4.5 34
5 504

Audible.com

3 editions of this book were published by Audible.com.

See editions

Penguin Australia

4 editions of this book were published by Penguin Australia.

Editions: 0140501738, 0140542523, 0670063363, 0670013110

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

You are using the new servers! | About | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 113,785,933 books! | Top bar: Always visible