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Radical Homemakers: Reclaiming Domesticity…
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Radical Homemakers: Reclaiming Domesticity from a Consumer Culture

by Shannon Hayes

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199859,063 (4.06)1
  1. 00
    Homeward Bound: Why Women Are Embracing the New Domesticity by Emily Matchar (chouffin)
    chouffin: Matchar takes a more skeptical view of Hayes manifesto, but she does interview Hayes and tackle class issues around Hayes' philosophy. Good for anyone interested in homemaking and feminism.
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Showing 1-5 of 8 (next | show all)
Awesome book, but not very fresh if you're already a homesteader. I can see how a book like this would be very reassuring for first-timers. Excellent subject matter. ( )
  willszal | Jan 3, 2016 |
Great book, not some nice theoretical ideas, everything is already tried and gathered together from all over the country, so the way of living Shannon Hayes describes is possible. Great motivation !!! ( )
  brigitte64 | Sep 26, 2013 |
I honestly didn't want this book to end. I related to this book so much that it made me a bit depressed. It's a very honest look at how our nation is driven by corporations and consumerism, and how there are many ways to live against those principals that will make you a happier and healthier human being. I definitely want to read this again sometime, and I hope that by making small changes, little by little my family will be happier and healthier, too. ( )
  OneBookMore | Mar 30, 2013 |
Intelligently written. Even though I do not agree with all of the suggestions or models described in the book, I highly recommend Radical Homemakers to anyone who is interested in reducing the accumulation of "stuff" and increasing happiness. ( )
  swivelgal | May 31, 2012 |
An interesting book that looks at how it is possible to live outside the consumer-driven, extractive economy and live a life that commits to principles that benefit all. Importantly, the author explains how choosing to be a 'homemaker' does not mean you are turning your back on feminism (she explicitly references Friedan in many places)and that women, and men, do not need to have a full time job in the 'normal' sense to be equal.

This is not so much a 'how to' be a Radical Homemaker, but rather a call to arms and 'why'. It is inspiring and well-written, but still heavily researched with plenty of footnotes. While the section on health insurance is really not relevant to those of us who don't live in the USA, the rest of the book is extremely relevant to anyone who is wondering if 'dropping out' is really an answer, especially if you believe in the importance of feminism and community rather than just your own family. ( )
1 vote ForrestFamily | Nov 17, 2011 |
Showing 1-5 of 8 (next | show all)
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0979439116, Paperback)

Mother Nature has shown her hand. Faced with climate change, dwindling resources, and species extinctions, most Americans understand the fundamental steps necessary to solve our global crises-drive less, consume less, increase self-reliance, buy locally, eat locally, rebuild our local communities.

In essence, the great work we face requires rekindling the home fires.

Radical Homemakers is about men and women across the U.S. who focus on home and hearth as a political and ecological act, and who have centered their lives around family and community for personal fulfillment and cultural change. It explores what domesticity looks like in an era that has benefited from feminism, where domination and oppression are cast aside and where the choice to stay home is no longer equated with mind-numbing drudgery, economic insecurity, or relentless servitude.

Radical Homemakers nationwide speak about empowerment, transformation, happiness, and casting aside the pressures of a consumer culture to live in a world where money loses its power to relationships, independent thought, and creativity. If you ever considered quitting a job to plant tomatoes, read to a child, pursue creative work, can green beans and heal the planet, this is your book.



(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:11:03 -0400)

"Radical Homemakers is about men and women across the U.S. who focus on home and hearth as a political and ecological act; who center their lives around family and community for personal fulfillment and cultural change"--P. [4] of cover.

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