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Lost States: True Stories of Texlahoma,…
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Lost States: True Stories of Texlahoma, Transylvania, and Other States… (original 2010; edition 2010)

by Michael J. Trinklein

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2555044,916 (3.87)8
Member:amkm
Title:Lost States: True Stories of Texlahoma, Transylvania, and Other States That Never Made it
Authors:Michael J. Trinklein
Info:Quirk Books (2010), Hardcover, 160 pages
Collections:Your library
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Lost States: True Stories of Texlahoma, Transylvania, and Other States That Never Made it by Michael J. Trinklein (2010)

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Showing 1-5 of 50 (next | show all)
States that might have been.
  Mapguy314 | Mar 13, 2016 |

Who wants to live in the breakaway territory of Nataqua? Apparently no women did, so it failed to acquire the population necessary for statehood. Anyone favor living in “Transylvania”? It was a failed state, in what would later become Kentucky, proposed by Daniel Boone. How about the state known as “Chicago”? You read that last sentence right, the great city of “Chicago” once had aspirations of becoming its’ own state. This was mostly born out of anger at not having enough representation in the state government (being outvoted by farmers makes one think of revolution). This book is full of many more cases of states, some crazy (like Boston as a city-state) and others rather logical (such as a better division of Idaho, Washington and Oregon) as well as the details behind the division of the Dakotas, the reoccurring attempts at New Jersey and Maine divisions and the desires of Long Island to separate from New York and become its own state. “Lost States” is a walk down the popular Historic Lane of What Might-Have-Been. It is a series of engaging, interesting, funny and surprising tales, all contained within a book less than 200 pages long. Each “failed state” has the pertinent details behind its creation attempt described and also includes either a map of the period with the state on it, or one of the author’s own creation. These short little snippets of our forgotten history help to illustrate the parts, politics, population, foreign policy, state and federal governments, environment, human temperament and sheer randomness played in the creation of the country we know today as the “United States of America”. ( )
  ThothJ | Dec 4, 2015 |

Who wants to live in the breakaway territory of Nataqua? Apparently no women did, so it failed to acquire the population necessary for statehood. Anyone favor living in “Transylvania”? It was a failed state, in what would later become Kentucky, proposed by Daniel Boone. How about the state known as “Chicago”? You read that last sentence right, the great city of “Chicago” once had aspirations of becoming its’ own state. This was mostly born out of anger at not having enough representation in the state government (being outvoted by farmers makes one think of revolution). This book is full of many more cases of states, some crazy (like Boston as a city-state) and others rather logical (such as a better division of Idaho, Washington and Oregon) as well as the details behind the division of the Dakotas, the reoccurring attempts at New Jersey and Maine divisions and the desires of Long Island to separate from New York and become its own state. “Lost States” is a walk down the popular Historic Lane of What Might-Have-Been. It is a series of engaging, interesting, funny and surprising tales, all contained within a book less than 200 pages long. Each “failed state” has the pertinent details behind its creation attempt described and also includes either a map of the period with the state on it, or one of the author’s own creation. These short little snippets of our forgotten history help to illustrate the parts, politics, population, foreign policy, state and federal governments, environment, human temperament and sheer randomness played in the creation of the country we know today as the “United States of America”. ( )
  ThothJ | Dec 3, 2015 |

Who wants to live in the breakaway territory of Nataqua? Apparently no women did, so it failed to acquire the population necessary for statehood. Anyone favor living in “Transylvania”? It was a failed state, in what would later become Kentucky, proposed by Daniel Boone. How about the state known as “Chicago”? You read that last sentence right, the great city of “Chicago” once had aspirations of becoming its’ own state. This was mostly born out of anger at not having enough representation in the state government (being outvoted by farmers makes one think of revolution). This book is full of many more cases of states, some crazy (like Boston as a city-state) and others rather logical (such as a better division of Idaho, Washington and Oregon) as well as the details behind the division of the Dakotas, the reoccurring attempts at New Jersey and Maine divisions and the desires of Long Island to separate from New York and become its own state. “Lost States” is a walk down the popular Historic Lane of What Might-Have-Been. It is a series of engaging, interesting, funny and surprising tales, all contained within a book less than 200 pages long. Each “failed state” has the pertinent details behind its creation attempt described and also includes either a map of the period with the state on it, or one of the author’s own creation. These short little snippets of our forgotten history help to illustrate the parts, politics, population, foreign policy, state and federal governments, environment, human temperament and sheer randomness played in the creation of the country we know today as the “United States of America”. ( )
  ThothJ | Dec 3, 2015 |
The information was interesting. I didn't appreciate the author's style of writing. ( )
  davemac | Sep 5, 2014 |
Showing 1-5 of 50 (next | show all)
Lost States is a quick little jaunt into the possibilities of what might have been had things gone in a slightly different direction. It's informative and fun, and if you're a history nerd, you should totally check it out.
added by cinaedus | editThe Stranger, Paul Constant (Mar 16, 2010)
 
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For Lynne and Tim, who tolerate my quirks
daily. And my parents, who drove Patti and me
through nearly every state in the union.
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The history of proposed states which never quite made it.

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