HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Brother Eagle, Sister Sky by Susan Jeffers
Loading...

Brother Eagle, Sister Sky (original 1991; edition 2002)

by Susan Jeffers

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations
8474210,623 (3.71)None
Member:hemlokgang
Title:Brother Eagle, Sister Sky
Authors:Susan Jeffers
Info:Puffin (2002), Paperback, 32 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:****
Tags:Children

Work details

Brother Eagle, Sister Sky by Susan Jeffers (Illustrator) (1991)

None

None.

Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

Showing 1-5 of 42 (next | show all)
lovely illustrations, great message ( )
  llyramoon | Jun 17, 2014 |
Reading Level: Primary
Genre: Nonfiction - Informational
Summary: A message for Chief Seattle ad he describes the Native American’s love for the Earth and the want and need to preserve it.
Evaluation: This is a beautiful message from an Indian chief that clearly shows the students how much the Native Americans appreciated the land and nature. This message by Chief Seattle is beautifully written and is very descriptive when talking about the beautiful Earth that the Indians lived on. This book shows the reader that the Indians appreciated all the beauty of the Earth and lived as one with the land, rather than trying to destroy it. The illustrations are stunning and cover the entire page. They are done in fine-line pen with ink and dyes and capture the beauty of America and show how the Indians live.
  rdg301library | May 27, 2014 |
2Q- inaccuracies and misrepresentation plague this book. Severely adapted text does not resemble the words of Chief Sealth accepted by historians and the Suquamish people. Pen and ink illustrations of Native Americans from the Plains region are well-done, but unfortunately the subjects and settings are not appropriate for the setting of the text (Pacific Northwest).
3P- Some readers will enjoy the double spread images and the environmental message, but the inaccuracies and stereotypical images will offend many. ( )
  claudiathelibrarian | May 4, 2012 |
4Q 2P

This is a classic book but I think it seems a bit dated now and has almost a stereotypical view of American Indian culture. The tale is adapted from a supposed speech, but the illustrations, although very detailed and beautiful, are dating the book. I don't think that many children will pick this book out on their own, without parent or teacher encouragement. ( )
  daisyacg | May 3, 2012 |
5Q
4P

Though the language may be difficult for early elementary school children to read on their own, Chief Seattle's powerful message speaks to children and adults of all ages. The vivid illustrations add emotional depth to the message and evoke thoughts of an emotional connection between humanity and nature.
  Sara_Killough | Apr 27, 2012 |
Showing 1-5 of 42 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors (3 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Jeffers, SusanIllustratorprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Chief Seattlemain authorall editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
This book is especially for Rye, Bud, Karen, Gay and Alden Vervaet who held in their mind the memory of the land as it was and have returned it to us to be loved by all. Special thanks to Mag-la-Que, Mahte-Topah, and Miyaca.
This book is especially for Rye, Bud, Karen, Gay and Alden Vervaet who held in their mind the memory of the land as it was and have returned it to us to be loved by all.
Special thanks to Mag-la-Que, Mahte-Topah, and Miyaca
First words
In a time so long ago that nearly all traces of it are lost in the prairie dust, an ancient people were a part of the land that we love and call America.
In a time so long ago that nearly all traces of it are lost in the prairie dust, an ancient people were a part of the land that we love and all America
Quotations
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (1)

Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0803709692, Hardcover)

"How can you buy the sky? How can you own the rain and the wind?"

So begin the moving words attributed to a great American Indian chief--Chief Seattle--over 100 years ago. They are words that eloquently capture the central belief of Native Americans: that this earth and every creature on it is sacred. It is this belief that inspired Susan Jeffers' extraordinary full-color paintings.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:43:55 -0400)

(see all 5 descriptions)

A Suquamish Indian chief describes his people's respect and love for the earth, and concern for its destruction.

(summary from another edition)

» see all 5 descriptions

Quick Links

Swap Ebooks Audio
29 avail.
12 wanted

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.71)
0.5
1 5
1.5
2 6
2.5 1
3 15
3.5 10
4 26
4.5 1
5 23

Penguin Australia

An edition of this book was published by Penguin Australia.

» Publisher information page

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

Help/FAQs | About | Privacy/Terms | Blog | Contact | LibraryThing.com | APIs | WikiThing | Common Knowledge | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | 91,500,563 books! | Top bar: Always visible