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Introduction to Quantum Mechanics by David…
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Introduction to Quantum Mechanics (1982)

by David J. Griffiths

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According to the title the book is intended to be an introduction to quantum mechanics, but in fact it introduces the reader to wave mechanics. This is the story with many other introductory books on the subject, and as an introduction to wave mechanics this book is not that bad, although not excellent.

But wave mechanics is not the whole story: the wave function formalism is not the most fundamental one and besides it is not general. There are a lot of quantum systems the state of which can not be described by any kind of function. The educational tradition is that usually students are introduced to wave mechanics first, and then, if necessary, to more general and fundamental state vector formalism of quantum mechanics.

From my experience I even doubt that introducing quantum mechanics in such a way, i.e. in form of wave mechanics, is the best way to teach the subject, but in case if someone wants to continue his way into quantum mechanics after this or any other introductory book on wave mechanics, I could recommend Lectures on Quantum Theory Mathematical and Structural Foundations by C. J. Isham. ( )
  kemiisto | Mar 27, 2015 |
This book is so incredibly easy to read it's hard to believe it's a full-fledged quantum mechanics textbook with equations and everything. A lot of people whine about this book which essentially boils down to technical nitpicking. It's the most accessible way to really do Q.M. out there. ( )
  wweisser | Jul 6, 2013 |
too good ( )
  venkatapraveen | Aug 18, 2010 |
I've never had this book required for a class, but it's a great reference. Where Brandsen & Joachain is a bit light on the math, Griffiths goes through lots of proofs which is very helpful in learning the physics of quantum mechanics. ( )
  lemontwist | Dec 28, 2009 |
I don't like griffiths writing. His EM book is better than this one because if I'm not mistaken that is his pet field. I find him to be self-adulatory and annoying. This book is very much lacking on the quasiclassical prequantum material that led to the formation of quantum mechanics. David Bohm's book is far more comprehensive. French and Taylor's book is much deeper on physical insight, whereas griffith's book is mostly mathematics. This book left me unsatisfied and unconfident and unconvinced of quantum theory. ( )
  divisionbyzer0 | Jun 16, 2009 |
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0131118927, Hardcover)

This book first teaches learners how to do quantum mechanics, and then provides them with a more insightful discussion of what it means. Fundamental principles are covered, quantum theory presented, and special techniques developed for attacking realistic problems. The book¿s two-part coverage organizes topics under basic theory, and assembles an arsenal of approximation schemes with illustrative applications. For physicists and engineers.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 17:57:50 -0400)

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