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For the love of trains; the story of British…
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For the love of trains; the story of British tram and railway preservation

by Denis Dunstone

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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0711033013, Hardcover)

At the end of the 20th century there were some 2,000 locomotives preserved in Britain, some 400 miles of privately operated preserved track, and a National Tramway Museum, the envy of the world. This book reviews how this came about. In particular it seeks to understand the motivations of those who have made such superlative efforts, not only in building and restoring, campaigning and preserving, but also in responding to the demands of managing in an age of increasing regulation. It begins with the early preservations by enthusiasts in the museum sector and moves through the uneven and unplanned processes of the railway companies to the more carefully articulated approach of the nationalised authority after 1948. Locomotive preservation by a few rich enthusiasts following the end of steam on BR, led to the creation of private workshops and running sheds. Although the locomotive is the most obvious and popular feature, railway preservation embraces much more, from tickets and ephemera through records and small relics to the infrastructure and buildings, and, in the end, to the whole atmosphere of travel in a previous age. So in addition to locomotives, whole railways have been preserved. The Transport TrustThis book is sold in aid of this charity, which exists to support transport preservation and restoration in Britain. Founded in 1965, it has campaigned, fund raised, and promoted the cause of heritage transport.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 17:59:47 -0400)

This study of the development of railway preservation in the British Isles examines contributions from both the public and private sectors.

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