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The Reversal by Michael Connelly
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The Reversal (original 2010; edition 2010)

by Michael Connelly

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1,762654,000 (3.85)46
Member:cmwoods_71
Title:The Reversal
Authors:Michael Connelly
Info:Little, Brown and Company (2010), Edition: First Edition, Hardcover, 400 pages
Collections:Your library, Read but unowned
Rating:****
Tags:None

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The Reversal by Michael Connelly (2010)

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» See also 46 mentions

English (61)  Spanish (2)  French (1)  Swedish (1)  All languages (65)
Showing 1-5 of 61 (next | show all)
94 points out of 100 -- 5 stars

Plot -- 19 out of 20 points
The idea that a killer could be guilty, despite being exonerated by physical evidence, is a nice twist on the recent developments in DNA testing that have led to long-time prisoners being released. Jason Jessup is hardly a model prisoner, but he knows how to work the crowd. Normally arguing cases for the defense, Mickey Haller finds himself outside his comfort zone when he is tapped to prove Jessup actually did the killings for which he served time. Calling on an ex-wife or two as legal backup is a nice touch, as is the use of half-brother and experienced cop Harry Bosch.

Characters -- 19 out of 20 points
Mr. Connelly’s strong suit as an author is his ability to develop characters that manage to push themselves beyond their ordinary strengths once they become invested in the case. It’s easy to understand the frustration of a cop like Harry; he knows too well that if he gets it wrong, someone could die. Mickey, suddenly on the “dark” side of prosecuting, focuses on what matters most, determining whether Jessup is innocent or guilty, in order to prepare the prosecution. The lead females in the story are portrayed as smart, empathetic, and humanizing in the author’s hands. Having both men dealing with daughters at the same time offers a nice contrast in their choices of approach to the world of teenage angst. One of the most sympathetic characters is Sarah Gleason. It’s hard not to root for her as she takes on an almost impossible task in the courtroom, convincing jurors she really did identify the real killer all those years ago.

Setting -- 18 out of 20 points
The legal and law enforcement aspects of the case are treated very differently by the prosecution and investigation teams, and Mr. Connelly uses an interesting technique to highlight the unique perspectives. By sharing Mickey’s story in the first person and Harry’s in the third, it creates the illusion of merging together the two entities. The prosecutorial process is rife with politics and tainted by the constant maneuvering for position as top dog. The investigatory process is all about getting the evidence right and striving to avoid the temptation to cut corners, while pursuing very dangerous felons, occasionally stymied by the realities of Constitutional law. Harry and his team might suspect Jessup is about to kill again, but that’s not enough probable cause to trample the creep’s rights.

Pacing -- 19 out of 20 points
The tale moves quickly, even as it passes back and forth between points of view. There’s plenty of action as Harry and his team of specialists tail Jessup on his nocturnal forays. The author blends everyday family interactions into the mystery, giving us those ordinary moments between tense, frantic chases, allowing the reader a few pages of breathing space and some valuable emotional downtime for the heroes. The courtroom antics and lawyer exchanges, while less physically dramatic (with a couple of important exceptions) than the police hunts, are intellectually and verbally vibrant, keeping the reader’s interest.

Tone -- 19 out of 20 points
The author manages to make this story come alive by enticing us to care one way or another about the characters, whether it’s to revile some or feel compassion for others. No one is perfect, mistakes are made, but by the time the finale unfolds, it’s easy to feel comfortable and safe in the company of the determined team trying to get a bad guy off the streets. The personal differences between Mickey and Harry remain tucked out of sight as the two men work together; those family mysteries take a back seat to the importance of solving the case. The reader learns that Harry’s daughter used to live with her mother and something terrible happened. The father-daughter relationship is still new to him, and as he adjusts to having his daughter in his home, he tries to balance fairness with the realities of his job. Is Jessup stalking him, stalking his family? Harry will do whatever it takes to protect everyone from the man he believes is a monster. ( )
  sarambarton | Oct 16, 2014 |
I really enjoyed this book, a great mystery that kept me interested until the end. ( )
  Ruth.Ford.Elward | Sep 16, 2014 |
Entertaining crime thriller. ( )
  starkravingmad | Aug 10, 2014 |
Mickey Haller... for the People?!!
While I'm relatively new to the Lincoln Lawyer series, I already struggle as seeing Haller as anything but the Lincoln Lawyer (that includes the flash backs to his time as a PD in the previous book). But this worked. It was believable and I loved the teamwork between Haller, Bosch and Maggie McFierece, who I adore. The characters were all easily believable - with CLever Clive as slimy as Haller isn't.
I need to go read the Bosch series to fill in some of the holes in the history (his daughter, Halling) and apparently Michael Connelly is my summer reading project. However I already see signs three books in of this being a lot like Linda Fairstein/James Patterson in "who is threatening the heroes' lives as the books end"

The only thing I didn't care for with this book was the flipping between 1st and 3rd person. While I realized later that the 3rd person was Bosch, I found that confusing. ( )
  skinglist | Jun 15, 2014 |
I always enjoy reading Michael Connelly's novels, and The Reversal was no exception. I actually prefer the Harry Bosch novels, not being a big fan of first person narratives, so this was a good mix of Bosch and Haller, with alternating third and first person points of view.

( )
  REDonald | Apr 26, 2014 |
Showing 1-5 of 61 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (9 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Michael Connellyprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Flegenheimer, CeciliaPhotographersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Owen, MarkCover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Tettamanti, StefanoTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Traverso, GiulianaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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To Shannon Byrne
with many thanks
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The last time I had eaten at the Water Grill I sat across the table from a client who had coldly and calculatedly murdered his wife and her lover, shooting both of them in the face.
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Book description
Longtime defense attorney Mickey Haller is recruited to change stripes and prosecute the high-profile retrial of a brutal child murder. After 24 years in prison, convicted killer Jason Jessup has been exonerated by new DNA evidence. Haller is convinced Jessup is guilty, and he takes the case on the condition that he gets to choose his investigator, LAPD Detective Harry Bosch.

Together, Bosch and Haller set off on a case fraught with political and personal danger. Opposing them is Jessup, now out on bail, a defense attorney who excels at manipulating the media, and a runaway eyewitness reluctant to testify after so many years.

With the odds and the evidence against them, Bosch and Haller must nail a sadistic killer once and for all. If Bosch is sure of anything, it is that Jason Jessup plans to kill again.
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After 24 years in prison, convicted killer Jason Jessup has been exonerated by new DNA evidence. Longtime defense attorney Mickey Haller is convinced Jessup is guilty, and he takes the case on the condition that he gets to choose his investigator, LAPD Detective Harry Bosch. Together, Bosch and Haller set off on a case fraught with political and personal danger. Opposing them is Jessup, now out on bail, a defense attorney who excels at manipulating the media, and a runaway eyewitness reluctant to testify after so many years.… (more)

(summary from another edition)

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