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The Landry News by Andrew Clements
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The Landry News (1999)

by Andrew Clements

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Showing 1-5 of 25 (next | show all)
It was on a list of summer reading for my fourth-grade daughter. Plus, I used to write an “underground” newspaper, so I couldn’t pass this up.

But it reads like it was meant to be used for curriculum. It reeks of “written to be taught”, not because the author had something to say or a good story in mind. I deduce this because it’s padded badly. The beginning doesn’t match the ending–it switches themes partway through. After about a third of the way, it stops being about the student-published newspaper and becomes about the “evil principal” trying to “get” the teacher. And then the news story he hides behind is reprinted word for word in the book. And it has nothing to do with either idea. Its content is about a kid’s divorce. It has nothing to do with the themes of the main plot. I don’t know what its meant for. I think it’s trying to cover different themes at once so there’s plenty for the class to discuss.

The inciting incident is also too implausible — I cannot believe that at teacher would sit at his desk for eight hours a day, reading the paper, while the kids futz in the classroom semi-supervised and not being taught. From 7AM to 3PM. Teachers have been fired for less, tenure or not.

It’s so instructive I expected there to be a study guide in the back. Just skip this one. ( )
  theWallflower | Feb 14, 2019 |
While it contains an introduction of sorts for middle readers to censorship and the First Amendment to the Constitution, this story is only adequate. Because of its brevity, there's not much room to develop characters, but the discussions on the First Amendment, especially as they apply to student writing, create more heft and momentum. The book does, like its titular newspaper, contain truth and mercy, but it also provides a primer as to why so many writers skirt technology. The passages about computer use will seem (not surprisingly given the 1999 copyright) primitive to today's 10-year-old digital natives.

As a teacher, I find it hard to believe the premise that the burnt-out teacher, who reads the newspaper during his classes, is allowed to continue for seven years before 5th grader Cara Landry revivifies his classroom & salvages his pride & his career. Might this premise might fly for its intended audience? Not likely. ( )
  msmilton | Jul 18, 2018 |
While it contains an introduction of sorts for middle readers to censorship and the First Amendment to the Constitution, this story is only adequate. Because of its brevity, there's not much room to develop characters, but the discussions on the First Amendment, especially as they apply to student writing, create more heft and momentum. The book does, like its titular newspaper, contain truth and mercy, but it also provides a primer as to why so many writers skirt technology. The passages about computer use will seem (not surprisingly given the 1999 copyright) primitive to today's 10-year-old digital natives.

As a teacher, I find it hard to believe the premise that the burnt-out teacher, who reads the newspaper during his classes, is allowed to continue for seven years before 5th grader Cara Landry revivifies his classroom & salvages his pride & his career. Might this premise might fly for its intended audience? Not likely. ( )
  msmilton | Jul 18, 2018 |
This book would most likely be read individually by the students. In a fifth grade class, the students could write about an event or something they deem to be an issue in their school in a journalistsic way. Each writing would be about a page or two long. When complete, the entires would be places in a binder, and would become a newspaper for the whole class to read. For younger grades, such as 3rd or 4th, students could discuss the differences between a school newspaper and a real newspaper, such as the Chicago Trubune. The students could then bring in a current event clipping from a newspaper, and describe the journalistic qualities of the writing based off what they learned from The Landry News book.
  kkminime | Feb 22, 2017 |
You could use this book as a read together for fifth graders. For an extension activity, you and your students could create your own classroom newspaper. Students could learn about the different aspects of creating a paper, the different topics, and all of the work it takes to actually create one. You could even give the students real jobs such as editor, sports writer, etc. This way the students practice their writing skills and get to experience writing an actual paper. You could also read this book with a fourth grade classroom. You could use it as an extension to go into social studies to talk about the BIll of Rights. You could talk about the first amendment and freedom of speech and how that would apply to Cara in her situation.
  AleciaTomes | Feb 22, 2017 |
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Epigraph
Dedication
For my brother Denney--
a good writer, a good journalist,
a good man
First words
"Cara Louise, I am talking to you!"
Quotations
Her mother smiled at her and said, "Truth is good, and it's all right to let the truth be known. But when you are publishing all that truth, just be sure there's some mercy, too. Then you'll be okay.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0689828683, Paperback)

NEW STUDENT GETS OLD TEACHER

The bad news is that Cara Landry is the new kid at Denton Elementary School. The worse news is that her teacher, Mr. Larson, would rather read the paper and drink coffee than teach his students anything. So Cara decides to give Mr. Larson something else to read -- her own newspaper, The Landry News.

Before she knows it, the whole fifth-grade class is in on the project. But then the principal finds a copy of The Landry News, with unexpected results. Tomorrow's headline: Will Cara's newspaper cost Mr. Larson his job?

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:14:35 -0400)

(see all 6 descriptions)

A fifth-grader starts a newspaper with an editorial that prompts her burnt-out classroom teacher to really begin teaching again, but he is later threatened with disciplinary action as a result.

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